1929: The Year of the Great Crash

1929: The Year of the Great Crash❰PDF / Epub❯ ☁ 1929: The Year of the Great Crash Author William K. Klingaman – Heartforum.co.uk The year saw both the peak of roaring s prosperity and the stock market collapse that led to the Great Depression, when a third of the US work force was unemployed With vivid narrative and anecdotal The Year of the Great Kindle - yearsaw both the peak of roaring s Year of eBook ↠ prosperity and the stock market collapse that led to the Great Depression, when a third of the US work force was unemployed With vivid narrative and 1929: The MOBI :Ä anecdotal profiles of such diverse characters as Herbert Hoover, Al Capone, Joseph P Kennedy, the Marx Brothers, F Scott Fitzgerald and J P Morgan, Klingaman shows that the same mob psychology that had borne the The Year of eBook ✓ bull market to irrational heights eventually dragged stock prices far below inherent value RCA, for example, plunged fromtoOstentatious wealth, Prohibition gang wars, deadly labor suppression, political corruption, bank and brokerage wipeouts and margin loan suicides all are seen here as part of an economic and government failure that preceded the rise of Adolf Hitler and Franklin D Roosevelt.

Is Year of the Great Kindle - a well known author, some of his Year of eBook ↠ books are a fascination for readers like in the : The Year of the Great Crash book, this is one of the most wanted William K 1929: The MOBI :Ä Klingaman author readers around the world.

1929: The Year of the Great Crash MOBI ô Year of the
    Import EPUB to the Program Import EPUB fromtoOstentatious wealth, Prohibition gang wars, deadly labor suppression, political corruption, bank and brokerage wipeouts and margin loan suicides all are seen here as part of an economic and government failure that preceded the rise of Adolf Hitler and Franklin D Roosevelt."/>
  • Hardcover
  • 393 pages
  • 1929: The Year of the Great Crash
  • William K. Klingaman
  • English
  • 07 March 2019
  • 0060160810

10 thoughts on “1929: The Year of the Great Crash

  1. Jill Hutchinson says:

    This is a fascinating book about a fascinating though tragic time in the history of the United States Things were on the upswing after the Great War and the newest fad, besides bootleg hooch and the Charleston, was investing in the stock market Although usually reserved for those in the upper echelon of income, stocks kept rising so swiftly that the guy next door started looking at maybe making a quick buck People were buying on margin and call loans were in the billions of dollars It coul This is a fascinating book about a fascinating though tragic time in the history of the United States Things were on the upswing after the Great War and the newest fad, besides bootleg hooch and the Charleston, was investing in the stock market Although usually reserved for those in the upper echelon of income, stocks kept rising so swiftly that the guy next door started looking at maybe making a quick buck People were buying on margin and call loans were in the billions of dollars It couldn t last and it didn t People lost everything they had, including their homes which they had mortgaged to buy stocks And the Great Depression began.The author tells the story of the great crash intermingled with the antics of the rich and famous who were dipping their toes in the market as well..Groucho Marx, Mayor Jimmy Walker, Al Capone, etc These anecdotes set the background of Roaring 20s and he melds them nicely with the seriousness of the financial situation in the US which he purports was caused not only by President Herbert Hoover who normally gets all the blame but also by President Calvin Coolidge Very well done history

  2. Nathan Albright says:

    I expectedout of this book having read another book where the author went through another dark year and discussed what happened among the people especially those people whose thoughts and behavior were able to leave a paper trial , and this book met those high expectations For better or worse, I do not have a great deal of personal interest in 1929 and the author s political worldview is likely to be one very different from me, but as he did in writing about the year after Pearl Harbor, I expectedout of this book having read another book where the author went through another dark year and discussed what happened among the people especially those people whose thoughts and behavior were able to leave a paper trial , and this book met those high expectations For better or worse, I do not have a great deal of personal interest in 1929 and the author s political worldview is likely to be one very different from me, but as he did in writing about the year after Pearl Harbor, the author did a good job here of allowing different people with different perspectives to speak for themselves, which then allows the reader to determine which information is most credible and whose perspectives are the ones that make the most sense Opinions from readers will differ on these matters, but to the author s credit he keeps the editorializing to a minimum and allows people in primary sources to speak their own opinions and judgments and to be shown through their own behavior, and that is commentary enough on the attitude of speculation and political grandstanding that made the year such a pivotal one in making World War II increasingly likely and increasingly ugly This sizable work of 350 pages is divided into four parts and 20 chapters We begin with a prologue that views the crash of 1929 as a glimpse of hell, which is a bit dramatic Part One, titled Vanity, covers the first seven chapters, beginning with election day in 1928 1 , and moving on the exploration of winter s bitterness 2 , the dawn of a new year 3 , speculation with other people s money 4 , a discussion of people with their heads in the sand 5 , the behavior of the Fed 6 , and the spider in the center of the web 7 After that the author looks at greed II , with discussions about the perils of prosperity 8 , the legacy of war 9 , the business of politics 10 , the twilight of the jazz age 11 , and the attack from the left in Europe 12 , as well as the thought that everybody ought to be rich 13 After that the book turns to the destruction caused by the crash III , with a look at how people who looked smart suddenly were shown to be dumb 14 , the breaking of the financial storm 15 , those dealing with the eye of the hurricane 16 , the smashup of corporate wealth 17 , and the aftermath of the crash 18 Finally, the book concludes with the despair IV that followed the crash, including the financial abyss 19 as well as the death of dreams 20 that followed the financial meltdown.There are some reasons why 1929 does not truly interest me as a reader For one, I find the intersection of politics and finance to be rather regrettable, especially since 1929 is often pitted in some sort of false dilemma between crony capitalism and socialism of some kind, both of which I hate Thankfully, there are at least a few people here who showed some sense, and there was definitely plenty of time that people had to get out of the market before the crash happened, as the boom had stopped months before the real crash happened Still, there are undoubtedly lessons that can be learned from this book and from the times that it happens to talk about Among the most important of these lessons is the insight that it is unwise to invest in anything that is based on inside information and that one cannot understand the logic of This book is full of poignant tales of loss, but a lot of that loss could have been avoided had people behaved in a responsible fashion and not bought the hype that the market can only go one way up Also, widespread prosperity depends not only on healthy markets, but also healthy standards of living for ordinary people, and the failure of the 1920 s and 1990 s to provide this proved crucial in leading to financial disasters that we seem seldom to learn from

  3. Fraser Sherman says:

    A curiously familiar book, as the mix of public gullibility, investor optimism, Wall Street con games and lax regulation combined to create an environment in which millions of investors held millions of dollars on paper in stocks, mostly bought on credit, a massive pyramid that overnight went sliding down to dust Klingaman also looks at various famous faces during that year, from FDR to President Hoover to the Marx Brothers to JP Morgan A good job, probably 3.5 stars.

  4. Susan Mazur Stommen says:

    Novelistic Takes a year and looks at it from various character perspectives We have Silent Cal playing pranks on his Secret Service and rocking on the front porch of the White House Harpo Marx hanging with the Algonquin Round Table set while Grouch worries about his investments Sprinkles of Will Rogers, who is told by Bernard Baruch to pay off his debts and hang tight.

  5. Gisselle says:

    A very good, readable history book on that year, which not only looked at the economic scene leading up to the crash, but also American culture and how it was influenced by the boom and bust The author focuses on certain well known figures to great effect, and it didn t drag or get boring.

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