Mexico: From the Olmecs to the Aztecs

Mexico: From the Olmecs to the Aztecs✭ [PDF] ✪ Mexico: From the Olmecs to the Aztecs By Michael D. Coe ✺ – Heartforum.co.uk Fifth edition, revised and expandedMichael D Coe s Mexico has long been recognized as the most readable and authoritative introduction to the region s ancient civilizations This companion to his best Fifth edition, revised and expandedMichael D Coe s the Olmecs Epub â Mexico has long been recognized as the most readable and authoritative introduction to the region s ancient civilizations This companion to his best selling The Maya has now been completely revised and expanded for the fifth edition by Professor Coe and Rex Koontz Colour plated an a Mexico: From PDF/EPUB or section on touring Mexico have been added, making the book an even valuable companion on any visit to Mexico s rich archaeological treasures.

Michael D Coe was an American archaeologist, anthropologist, the Olmecs Epub â epigrapher and author Primarily known for his work on the Maya civilization.

Mexico: From the Olmecs to the Aztecs PDF/EPUB Ä the
  • Paperback
  • 248 pages
  • Mexico: From the Olmecs to the Aztecs
  • Michael D. Coe
  • English
  • 19 December 2019
  • 050028346X

10 thoughts on “Mexico: From the Olmecs to the Aztecs

  1. Bob Newman says:

    meximum points for an interesting bookLoaded with excellent photos of objects, with drawings, architectural plans, and maps, this is one of Thames and Hudson s great books for which the authors should be congratulated Written in readable style, with a mixture of iconographic detail and summaries of knowledge about different periods of Mexican history, this book is a fabulous introduction to the ancient civilizations of Mexico except for the Maya I believe there is a separate volume for them W meximum points for an interesting bookLoaded with excellent photos of objects, with drawings, architectural plans, and maps, this is one of Thames and Hudson s great books for which the authors should be congratulated Written in readable style, with a mixture of iconographic detail and summaries of knowledge about different periods of Mexican history, this book is a fabulous introduction to the ancient civilizations of Mexico except for the Maya I believe there is a separate volume for them We start in the distant past of village life, moving towards the early urban civilizations, then to the Classic periods of the Olmecs, Teotihuacan, Monte Alban, Cacaxtala and others, then to the Toltecs, and finally to the Aztecs If you read MEXICO you will come away with an excellent basic understanding of what is known so far about those ancient peoples and cultures Given that there was farinformation available about the Aztecs, I found that section the most fascinating, but it s all good There s an epilogue, dealing with the Spanish conquest and even a section about visiting Mexico rather unexpected If you are teaching an introductory course on Mexico, this could be a textbook If you are planning a trip to the country and want an overview, this is it If you are at home, trying to get a handle on all the ecs of the Mexican past, you can straighten a lot of it out right here

  2. Aaron Meyer says:

    Michael Coe and his book on Mexico in the Ancient Peoples and Places series I must admit was boring the first half, it improved dramatically in the second half when it began talking about the Formative Period The main civilizations of the middle and southern Mexican regions were in order, the Olmec, Monte Alban I, Izapan these falling in the Formative Period roughly 1500 BC to 300 AD Then came the Classical Period 300 900 AD and the civilization of the Teotihuacan, the classic Veracruz civil Michael Coe and his book on Mexico in the Ancient Peoples and Places series I must admit was boring the first half, it improved dramatically in the second half when it began talking about the Formative Period The main civilizations of the middle and southern Mexican regions were in order, the Olmec, Monte Alban I, Izapan these falling in the Formative Period roughly 1500 BC to 300 AD Then came the Classical Period 300 900 AD and the civilization of the Teotihuacan, the classic Veracruz civilization, and classic Monte Alban This was the Mexican golden age Art and Science reached their highest refinement and literacy was widespread Then came the Post Classic Period and the rise of the early Militarists, a period divided into early and late and spanning the years 900 1524 AD You have the Toltecs, the Zapotecs, the Mixtecs, and finally the Aztecs Quite frankly I found the post classical period the most interesting by far and the Aztecs at the top of that pile Here is a group of people who from the deserts in the North enter into the historical picture as vagrants despised by all the civilized peoples of Mexico The people of Colhuacan finally allowed them to work their lands as serfs and even allowed their chief to marry a Colhuacan princess, whom they sacrificed instead So for this act they were driven out of the land From there they wandered the land living a hand to mouth existence, until they came to a great lake and they seen an eagle on a cactus holding a snake in its mouth This was a fulfillment of one of their prophecies and there they bult their city They prospered as mercenaries in the armies of the Tepanec Kingdom of Atzcapotzalco ruled by Tezozomoc Tezozomoc gave the Aztecs their first king, Acamapichtli 1367 87 Itzcoatl the fourth king went to war and overthrew their overlord, the Tepanecs, thereby becoming the greatest state in Mexico From there the kings who followed continued the expansion of the empire until the ill fated Moctezuma II The Aztecs created an incredible empire and the economy ran on mainly barter items There was no money Cocoa beans, quills with gold dust, and manufactured items pretty much was the coin of the day Further tribute was the grease which kept the wheels of empire wet From Maize, beans, sage seed, and grain amaranth, cotton cloaks and war constumes, amber and feather headdresses, such was the tribute which flowed into the capital and outwards once again to pay and supply soldiers The Spanish were intrigued with the exactness of the system, no doubt wondering how to use it for themselves LOL Although not much of the poetry or songs were presented in the book there were a few short pieces included Who can deny the sweetness of the following pieces..The battlefield is the place where one toasts the divine liquor in war,where are stained red the divine eagles,where the tigers howl, where all kinds of precious stones rain from ornaments,where brave headdresses rich with fine plumes,where princes are smashed to bits and There is nothing like death in war,nothing like the flowery deathso precious to Him who gives life far off I see it my heart yearns for it then on attributed to a King Nezahualcoyotl of TexcocoEven jade is shattered,Even gold is crushed,Even quetzal plumes are torn One does not live forever on this earth We endure only for an instant Wow, such finality in thought and such passion for the joys of battle and death Makes me want to find some translations of Nahuatl songs that still exist and revel in their thoughts about life and death, devotion and sacrifice Lofty topics indeed Well that is a decent overview of that period, of course the Spanish came and wiped the Aztecs out Now I know there are alot of people who want to blame the white man for destroying Indian civilization but to tell the truth, the Indians were quite capable, and did repeatedly, wipe out civilization after civilization on their own The Spanish were simply another link in the chain of conquests which had been going on in this area for 2000 years orSo to hell with the naysayers and whiners for the Aztecs themselves understood full well that the fruits of victory go to the strongest Only this time it wasn t them

  3. Mi says:

    Coe and Koontz do a thorough yet not exhaustive review of the earliest civilisations in Mexico The transition from the Toltecs to the Aztecs is somewhat brief but this is also because there is not a substantial amount of historically verifiable data surrounding it I would say, however, that for the non academic this book could be challenging to read as it contains quite a lot of information that is not necessarily pertinent for a casual reader Nevertheless, the inclusion of pictures and arc Coe and Koontz do a thorough yet not exhaustive review of the earliest civilisations in Mexico The transition from the Toltecs to the Aztecs is somewhat brief but this is also because there is not a substantial amount of historically verifiable data surrounding it I would say, however, that for the non academic this book could be challenging to read as it contains quite a lot of information that is not necessarily pertinent for a casual reader Nevertheless, the inclusion of pictures and archaeological artefacts, along with the historical information, helps solidify the chronology as is presented I read this book for a graduate Mexican history course and was very intrigued by much of the information and details provided, which are usually not presented in a traditional andgeneralised historical account of these civilisations The epilogue Spanish conquest was brief, yet to the point, and provides a good foundation for readers that wish to continue chronologically to the next period of colonialism.4 stars

  4. Wendelle says:

    I ve tried before, and it is actually hard to find such a well written introductory yet scholarly book that informs us of all the Mesoamerican Empires in a chronological manner, from the arrival of hunter gatherers and the start of agriculture, to the Pre classical period of the Olmecs and Zapotecs, the Classical period of organized, mercantile city states Teotihuacan and Monte Alban, the Epiclassical reign of minor civilizations like Xochicalco, the rise of a craftsman like culture with the Tol I ve tried before, and it is actually hard to find such a well written introductory yet scholarly book that informs us of all the Mesoamerican Empires in a chronological manner, from the arrival of hunter gatherers and the start of agriculture, to the Pre classical period of the Olmecs and Zapotecs, the Classical period of organized, mercantile city states Teotihuacan and Monte Alban, the Epiclassical reign of minor civilizations like Xochicalco, the rise of a craftsman like culture with the Toltecs, and ultimately the savage, heart sacrificing, cannibalistic Spartan empire of the Aztecs Each civilization gets about 25 pages each, with plentiful pictures, and thus do not beggar their welcome with the leisurely reader

  5. Denise says:

    This book was beautiful It was incredible in that it broadened my perception of beauty and the power of art something that I did not think was possible at the time Before reading this book, I had absolutely no connection to Mexico s history I discovered that it s art historical tradition is complex, multi faceted, and thoroughly fascinating For the prehistoric and ancient peoples of this land create art and life were inseperable.

  6. Roberto Arrieta says:

    A few weeks ago I realized that I knewabout the ancient Egyptians, Babylonians and others civilizations of the eastern part of the world than about the pre Columbian cultures of my own continent So I picked the Michael D Coe book It contains only general information, so is the right one if you want a panoramic view or a first approximation to those people You won t find any particular point treated to any significant depth but still it ll fill you up of wonder at what these cultures ac A few weeks ago I realized that I knewabout the ancient Egyptians, Babylonians and others civilizations of the eastern part of the world than about the pre Columbian cultures of my own continent So I picked the Michael D Coe book It contains only general information, so is the right one if you want a panoramic view or a first approximation to those people You won t find any particular point treated to any significant depth but still it ll fill you up of wonder at what these cultures achieved without the wheel, or any great mathematic knowledge, or any noteworthy grasp of astronomy.The wheel topic is a mystery, though, because they had wheeled toys Other important thing is that in this book the author doesn t include the Maya civilization That s the subject of another whole book My next one.Good writing, good pictographic material The author takes you from the very beginnings of the first men in America through a chronological narrative, from one culture to the next, to give you a sense of how the development of history went, up to the Spaniards arrival, in the entire Mesoamerican country

  7. John Newton says:

    An excellent overview of most of the major civilizations of pre Columbian Mexico, at least those north of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec The Maya are covered in a separate volume While Michael Coe has writtenacademic volumes, this one is definitely accessible to general readers It covers the major sites, the periods when each civilization flourished, and their relationships to each other Even if you are simply traveling to Mexico as a tourist and only plan on spending a day or two visiti An excellent overview of most of the major civilizations of pre Columbian Mexico, at least those north of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec The Maya are covered in a separate volume While Michael Coe has writtenacademic volumes, this one is definitely accessible to general readers It covers the major sites, the periods when each civilization flourished, and their relationships to each other Even if you are simply traveling to Mexico as a tourist and only plan on spending a day or two visiting some of the country s archaeological sites, this book isn t a major commitment It is under 250 pages and before you are done, you ll understand at least broadly the most important aspects of the Aztec Mexica , Mixtec, Olmec, Tarascan, Toltec, Zapotec, and other cultures

  8. Lucas says:

    Super readable and loved how the illustrations picture were numbered and then referred to explicitly in the margins That being said, te beginning is a bit dull, and there s some signs this is an old book the phrase a black is used at one point near the end, which is not great.

  9. Ginny Martinez says:

    Scholarly book My take away is that there were a number of advanced civilizations in Mexico, especially in el Valle de Mexico, but as far north as Paquime Why not the equivalent in US The Mound People around St Louis 10 2019

  10. Ietrio says:

    Like the blurb, the book is written in an amateurish style full of superlatives and shallow on information.

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