I Can Never Forget: Men of the One Hundredth - Four Hundred Forty-Second



I Can Never Forget: Men of the One Hundredth - Four Hundred Forty-SecondHere Are The Voices And Stunning Images Of Extraordinary Men, Japanese American Soldiers Of World War II Who Belonged To The Most Decorated Unit Of Their Size In US Army History The Th Infantry Battalion And Nd Regimental Combat Team Together, The Men Of The Th Nd Were An Unstoppable Force As They Blazed Through Europe With Their Go For Broke Spirit Feared By German Troops, Revered By Villagers, The Japanese Americans Were At Once Fierce Fighters, Gentle Liberators And Prisoners Of War In Ways Than One Now, Decades After The War, The Usually Reserved And Silent Warriors Recall Their Innermost Thoughts And Feelings About This Tumultuous Time In Their Lives We Hear From Men Who Volunteered From Hawaii Plantations And American Style Concentration Camps We Discover How The Men Rose Above The Binds Of War And Racism And Responded To Injustice With An Untarnished Record Of Valor In Startling Images Recalled By The Veterans Themselves, Here Is The Dramatic Rescue Of The Lost Battalion In France S Dark Vosges Mountains, Considered By The US Army To Be One Of The Ten Greatest Battles Of World War II Here Too Are Japanese Americans Who Became Part Of Another Kind Of Rescue As They Bore Witness To One Of The Most Disturbing Chapters In Human History Their Haunting Words Recall The Prisoners Of Dachau, One Of Germany S Most Notorious Death Camps And Here The Men Bring To Vivid Life Wartime Social Dynamics That Existed Between And Among Blacks, Whites, And Asians Theirs Are Warm Touching Stories Of Hope And Unwavering Courage In The Face Of Overwhelming Odds I Can Never Forget, They Say Their Voices Belong To A Generation That Has Something Personal To Say To Everyone

Hawaii resident Thelma Chang, an award winning writer, was honored by the Hawaii State Legislature in 1991 for her work in preserving the history of World War II s Nisei soldiers Her human interest, science, and travel stories have appeared in numerous publications, including Air Space Smithsonian.

➪ I Can Never Forget: Men of the One Hundredth - Four Hundred Forty-Second Read ➲ Author Thelma Chang – Heartforum.co.uk
  • Hardcover
  • 207 pages
  • I Can Never Forget: Men of the One Hundredth - Four Hundred Forty-Second
  • Thelma Chang
  • English
  • 06 October 2017
  • 0963022806

10 thoughts on “I Can Never Forget: Men of the One Hundredth - Four Hundred Forty-Second

  1. Sarah Crawford says:

    Thelma Chang, 1991This is one of the books about the Japanese Americans who fought for the US in World War II, despite the fact that their parents and other loved ones were in internment camps in the US.Like the other books on the topic, this is a very good book, very interesting I will only point out some highlights from the book.The groups the men served in were the US Army s 100th Infantry Battalion, the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, the Military Intelligence Service, and the 1399th Enginee Thelma Chang, 1991This is one of the books about the Japanese Americans who fought for the US in World War II, despite the fact that their parents and other loved ones were in internment camps in the US.Like the other books on the topic, this is a very good book, very interesting I will only point out some highlights from the book.The groups the men served in were the US Army s 100th Infantry Battalion, the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, the Military Intelligence Service, and the 1399th Engineer Construction battalion the 370th Engineer Battalion formed the nucleus of this group.The first two groups ended up fighting in Europe, and were the most decorated units of their size in US Army history.The 1399th was in Hawaii, building roads, bridges, airfields, barracks, etc During the early part of the war, while the men worked, they were kept under armed guard In other words, soldiers in the US military were being guarded by soldiers in the US military How would it make you feel if you were trying to do something for your country, and you had to do it while you were being guarded by armed men, simply because your parents were Japanese The 100th and the 442nd became one unified group in June, 1944 The 100th became the first battalion of the 442nd, but they were still allowed to keep their own designation The groups served in Italy and France, and acquired over 18.000 individual decorations for bravery, a Congressional Medal of Honor, and 52 Distinguished Service Crosses.This was not done with their paying a very heavy price, however The 100th 442nd lost about two thirds of their men in the fighting In one review, the division commander wondered why there were so few men assembled, and he ws told that the men there were all that were left of the units.They were the objects of hatred and discrimination while in the US, training, though Some white businessmen wanted all the Japanese in Hawaii removed to the mainland internment camps, which was really something that was not feasible and would have dealt a major economic blow to Hawaii if it owouldh ave been done.The book talks about Hawaii just after the attack on Pearl Harbor On the 7th, the Governor of Hawaii placed the area under martial law Hawaii was a territory and not a state at the time He also suspended the right of habeas corpus, which was a person s right under the law to protection from illegal imprisonment Lieutenant General Walter Short proclaimed himself military governor at the same time He suppressed civil courts and put things under military rule, which mean that even misdemeanors would be tried in provost courts, presided over by Army officers, who decided punishment without reference to federal or local statues That lasted for three years.Japanese fishing fleets were impounded Hawaiians were urged to report any meetings of Japanese The persons of Japanese ancestry were prohibited from travel or changing residences They could not enter certain security areas, and all this even included Japanese Americans working for the Military Intelligence Service.How about the fear of persons of Japanese ancestry spying for Japan From 1942 through 1944, 18 were charged with spying for Japan All 18 were white.In early 1942, the War Department pushed for the removal of all soldiers of Japanese ancestry from active service By spring of 1942, a General Emmons wanted all Japanese American officers and men in the 298th and 299th Regiments put into a Hawaiian Provisional battalion and then sent to the mainland.No Japanese American officer was allowed to head a rifle company.When the nisei were moved to the mainland, there were problems with nisei that were from the mainland Those from Hawaii and those from the mainland didn t get along at first, the Hawaiians being sort of a rowdy, but close knit group, the mainlanders beingreserved andindividualistic If someone needed some money for something, he would just ask and someone else would give him the money, but mainlanders didn t do that type of thing There were even fights between the two groups from time to time.The nisei soldiers also had some difficulty when they were sent to the South for training, as they were not ready for the intense black white segregation of the south At first, they didn t even know what water fountains to drink from those marked White, or those marked Colored although they were later told to use the White fountains It is interesting that the book uses the term concentration camp for the internment camp at Jerome, Arkansas

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