Blood Feud



Blood FeudSold Into Slavery To The Northmen In The Tenth Century, A Young Englishman Becomes Involved In A Blood Feud Which Leads Him To Constantinople And A Totally Different Way Of Life

Rosemary Sutcliff, CBE was a British novelist, best known as a writer of highly acclaimed historical fiction Although primarily a children s author, the quality and depth of her writing also appeals to adults She once commented that she wrote for children of all ages from nine to ninety Born in West Clandon, Surrey, Sutcliff spent her early youth in Malta and other naval bases where her father was stationed as a naval officer She contracted Still s Disease when she was very young and was confined to a wheelchair for most of her life Due to her chronic sickness, she spent the majority of her time with her mother, a tireless storyteller, from whom she learned many of the Celtic and Saxon legends that she would later expand into works of historical fiction Her early schooling being continually interrupted by moving house and her disabling condition, Sutcliff didn t learn to read until she was nine, and left school at fourteen to enter the Bideford Art School, which she attended for three years, graduating from the General Art Course She then worked as a painter of miniatures.Rosemary Sutcliff began her career as a writer in 1950 with The Chronicles of Robin Hood She found her voice when she wrote The Eagle of the Ninth in 1954 In 1959, she won the Carnegie Medal for The Lantern Bearers and was runner up in 1972 with Tristan and Iseult In 1974 she was highly commended for the Hans Christian Andersen Award Her The Mark of the Horse Lord won the first Phoenix Award in 1985.Sutcliff lived for many years in Walberton near Arundel, Sussex In 1975 she was appointed OBE for services to Children s Literature and promoted to CBE in 1992 She wrote incessantly throughout her life, and was still writing on the morning of her death She never married.http us.macmillan.com author rosema

[Ebook] Blood Feud By Rosemary Sutcliff – Heartforum.co.uk
  • Hardcover
  • 144 pages
  • Blood Feud
  • Rosemary Sutcliff
  • English
  • 06 July 2018
  • 0525267301

10 thoughts on “Blood Feud

  1. Katie Hanna says:

    short version my smol gay Viking son deserved better long version cracks knuckles This book started out with tremendous potential, but really fell off in the second half Basically, it s the story of a 10th century British boy named Jestyn, kidnapped by Viking raiders, who eventually befriends and is freed by his Viking captor, Thormod Together, Jestyn and Thormod go on an adventure to far off Constantinople, in search of the guy who killed Thormod s father Hence the title, Blood Feud Y short version my smol gay Viking son deserved better long version cracks knuckles This book started out with tremendous potential, but really fell off in the second half Basically, it s the story of a 10th century British boy named Jestyn, kidnapped by Viking raiders, who eventually befriends and is freed by his Viking captor, Thormod Together, Jestyn and Thormod go on an adventure to far off Constantinople, in search of the guy who killed Thormod s father Hence the title, Blood Feud You are, of course, welcome to disagree with my assessment that the attachment between Thormod and Jestyn smacks of a littlethan ordinary brotherly friendship but that s how it struck me I particularly wish to draw my readers attention to their bond being compared in canon to that of Achilles and Patroclus and anyone with a working knowledge of Greek literature knows what that signifies Sutcliff, for sure, was not blind to the implications of such a reference In addition I would be interested in an alternative explanation why Thormod, the allegedly hot blooded Viking male, evinces ZERO interest in women throughout the ENTIRE narrative raises eyebrow Be that as it may, whether friends orthan friends, this pairing is built on tropes I can never resist Jestyn, the over eager puppy dog who thinks nothing is too good for Thormod, and Thormod, the big, casual, lazy sheepdog who won t let any harm come to his little buddy And for the first ten chapters or so, I was like, wOW, I LOVE this Because it was good After the halfway point, though, the emotional spark between them abruptly died out, their friendship slackened and then the author randomly killed off Thormod in battle without even giving him a chance to say goodbye eXcUsE mE wHaT It was almost like Sutcliff was afraid of where her story was going so she let it take a nosedive And I cannot approve of that solemnly shakes head We get a female love interest for Jestyn about two thirds of the way through not before The Lady Alexia While a unique, strong and spirited character in her own right, she justcame too late in the book for me to be fully invested in her Seriously, Rosemary Sutcliff, YOU GOTTA STOP DOING THAT, or I will be forced to conclude you simply don t care as much about the women in your stories as you care about the men And from my point of view, Alexia never really sparks with Jestyn I feel like we re just expected to be happy they re together because Thormod is dead now which ugh sighs Alsoooooooooooooooo, the way Jestyn describes her to the audience has a heavy touch of she s not like other girls syndrome and this Irks Me My other big complaint about this story is the way the blood feud plotline is handled Thormod swears to kill this guy, Jestyn swears to help him, and then they chase him all the way to Constantinople only to wait yearsssssssssssssss literal YEARS before getting down to the actual business of fighting Obstacles keep coming up to prevent it, over and over obstacles that feel iNCREDIBLY CONTRIVED I simply cannot believe that any normal, healthy, Viking warrior would be content with waiting so very long to get revenge on the guy who killed his father It came across as ludicrously out of character and boring to read, too, because the main goal of the plot kept being PUT OFF for another day It honestly felt like Sutcliff was just snatching at any excuse to postpone the fight until Thormod would be dead and Jestynwould decide to forgive the guy, instead of carrying on the feud in his name Which issweet and all I guess But unrealistic Also, honestly, if somebody was going to change their mind and choose forgiveness rather than vengeance, shouldn t it have been Thormod Thormod is the guy whose decisions drive most of this plot in the first place He s the one who chooses to free Jestyn, to make him his blood brother he s the one who chooses to pursue vengeance for his father he s the one who chooses to take that long, long journey to Constantinople to fulfill it so it seems to me, Thormod should be the one who chooses to forgo bloodshed and seek peace It would ve beencompelling, at any rate, to me, watching him change that way CERTAINLY a lotcompelling than him biting the dust in some random battle with nary a final word to say so, in conclusion my smol gay Viking son deserved better sniffles

  2. Jane says:

    Delightful novel of two young men one English, one Viking who become blood brothers and travel as part of the crew of a Viking ship down the Dnieper to Kiev in Rus, thence to Byzantium when they become part of the newly formed Varangian Guard to the Byzantine emperor A blood feud hangs over all The very poignant story tells us how the blood feud is finally resolved Sutcliff s usual gentle, sensitive writing brings this era to life with unforgettable characters and the beautiful themes of lo Delightful novel of two young men one English, one Viking who become blood brothers and travel as part of the crew of a Viking ship down the Dnieper to Kiev in Rus, thence to Byzantium when they become part of the newly formed Varangian Guard to the Byzantine emperor A blood feud hangs over all The very poignant story tells us how the blood feud is finally resolved Sutcliff s usual gentle, sensitive writing brings this era to life with unforgettable characters and the beautiful themes of loyalty and friendship

  3. Andrea says:

    This is one of the first books I remember buying, I was younger than ten and it was a library sale, and incredibly magical place in what seemed like a giant hall and books everywhere Reading it again it s enjoyable enough, and it s good historical fiction for a kid There s lots of war and blood and bad things happen but nothing too gory or disturbing and that s a half truth I don t like so much maybe and never anything like rape It certainly evokes a sense of the time and the country, with This is one of the first books I remember buying, I was younger than ten and it was a library sale, and incredibly magical place in what seemed like a giant hall and books everywhere Reading it again it s enjoyable enough, and it s good historical fiction for a kid There s lots of war and blood and bad things happen but nothing too gory or disturbing and that s a half truth I don t like so much maybe and never anything like rape It certainly evokes a sense of the time and the country, with some nostalgia to be sure, but where else would a kid like me have learned that slavery existed in Europe or that the Vikings travelled from their homelands to Britain and back and then down through Kiev and down to Constantinople when they were called in to help the emperor of Byzantium and formed the Varangian Guard

  4. Allison Tebo says:

    RTC

  5. Jo says:

    I finished Blood Feud in one big rush whilst in a waiting room and discovered that my holding back tears in public noise is weird.This book is short, and written for children, and marketed as a sort of bromance though I don t think the term had been coined when it was written , but in actual fact it is a beautiful love story for all ages The protagonist is Jestyn Englishman, and his best friend love of his life, Thormod Sitricson, a Viking Now, I know there will be people rolling their I finished Blood Feud in one big rush whilst in a waiting room and discovered that my holding back tears in public noise is weird.This book is short, and written for children, and marketed as a sort of bromance though I don t think the term had been coined when it was written , but in actual fact it is a beautiful love story for all ages The protagonist is Jestyn Englishman, and his best friend love of his life, Thormod Sitricson, a Viking Now, I know there will be people rolling their eyes at that, and grumbling under their breath about the misappropriation of nautical terms to refer to imagined gay relationships, but this isn t shipping These two are in real love The copy I have has them gazing fondly at each other on the cover But that s only my very first piece of evidence This is the first time they meet I looked round quickly, and saw him, real among all the rest who were only shadows p15 It s basically love at first sight for Jestyn, who promptly goes about risking his life for, getting into fights alongside and generally doting on his Viking like a rescued puppy I had thought that he looked at me as a man looks at a man, but he had whistled me to heel like a hound and like a hound, I had followedI knew that I could live as a thrall so long as I was Thormod s, but to be anybody else s would be beyond bearing p20 In case thegeneralised gooning didn t make it clear enough, Jestyn regales the reader regularly with his work in progress, The Ballad of Thormod s Shoulders I felt Thormod s shoulder where mine pressed against it p22 it was not the thrall ring that mattered to me most, but suddenly and warmly, the remembered feel of Thormod s shoulder against mine, mine against Thormod s, in the dark wynd p24 on the way down again, we walked side by side, shoulder brushing shoulder in the narrow ways p27 I could go on Even the blurb for the book states that Jestyn becomes Thormod s shoulder to shoulder man Indeed Now, it s possible that I love this book so much because I can relate to it, a little I, too, have a Viking that I adore though he s a bitinto musicals than carousing and he didn t so much buy me as a slave as acquiesce to being swooned over and I do daydream about being pressed against him quite a lot I did wonder, therefore, if I was just getting carried away and then came the line that made me think Sutcliff was totally on my side And so, she said for you too, there was a Patroclus p132 Aside from the sweeping romance, the two of them go to war, sort out the feud of the title, and have some other, smaller, adventures, which are simple but engaging, and the supporting characters that turn up are likeable, if not hugely fleshed out The setting is deftly realised, too none of that awful info dumping that I hate so much I ll definitely be seeking out Sutcliff s other works.In conclusion they loved each other, and I loved this book Thanks Dan I recommend it to all of you, now It s short, and easy to read, but still moving and evocative and lovely And not as harrowing as Vikings

  6. Simina says:

    I haven t read Sutcliff in a long time and I kinda forgot her style Well, this book was perfect to reacquaint me with her writing It was evocative and dark at times, without ever being really hopeless I liked her descriptions, as usual It s strange, because most of her books are set in Britain In this one, the characters go from England to the northern lands, to Kiev, Thrace and Constantinople, so I would have thought it was a bit outside Sutcliff s comfort zone Yet each place is brilliant I haven t read Sutcliff in a long time and I kinda forgot her style Well, this book was perfect to reacquaint me with her writing It was evocative and dark at times, without ever being really hopeless I liked her descriptions, as usual It s strange, because most of her books are set in Britain In this one, the characters go from England to the northern lands, to Kiev, Thrace and Constantinople, so I would have thought it was a bit outside Sutcliff s comfort zone Yet each place is brilliantly described, so much so that you become instantly familiar with it Very few writers have that much power in their descriptions, making the place they are describing become alive before your eyes Sutcliff is a master at this.Then there is the plot itself, and the characters, and I like how Sutcliff tackles the traditions of the Vikings, especially since they are told from the point of view of someone who doesn t completely understand them, even though he accepts them As usual, the road the characters take is not clear, there are many unexpected turns that change their paths, and the clever bit is that they are not overdone or unrealistic I also liked the ending I must admit I was beginning to suspect something of the kind, but that does not mean I did not enjoy it.All in all this was a brilliant and touching story, and it reminded me why I like Sutcliff so much in the first place

  7. Isis says:

    A book about a man and the slave he becomes BFF with and frees so they can go on a quest to an unfamiliar land to resolve the unfinished business due to the man s father also, there is a leg injury, and a girl who is pretty much peripheral to the story but ends up marrying the protagonist Sound familiar Okay, this is set roughly 800 years after The Eagle Of The Ninth, and it s the story of Esca rather than of Marcus , but wow, the similarities really bopped me in the nose And yeah, I enjoy A book about a man and the slave he becomes BFF with and frees so they can go on a quest to an unfamiliar land to resolve the unfinished business due to the man s father also, there is a leg injury, and a girl who is pretty much peripheral to the story but ends up marrying the protagonist Sound familiar Okay, this is set roughly 800 years after The Eagle Of The Ninth, and it s the story of Esca rather than of Marcus , but wow, the similarities really bopped me in the nose And yeah, I enjoyed both books quite a lot

  8. The Idle Woman says:

    For a review, please see my blog For a review, please see my blog

  9. Meredith says:

    Upon the death of his mother, 12 year old Jestyn is cast out by his step father He wanders to a coastal Saxon community where he is taken on as a cattle herd by the local chieftain He spends the next five years fairly comfortably until he is abducted by a group of raiding Vikings who sell him at the Dublin slave market Thormod, a Viking stationed at the local garrison, buys Jestyn on a whim for six gold pieces and a wolfskin cloak.Jestyn and Thormod form a bond, cemented by an act of loyalty Upon the death of his mother, 12 year old Jestyn is cast out by his step father He wanders to a coastal Saxon community where he is taken on as a cattle herd by the local chieftain He spends the next five years fairly comfortably until he is abducted by a group of raiding Vikings who sell him at the Dublin slave market Thormod, a Viking stationed at the local garrison, buys Jestyn on a whim for six gold pieces and a wolfskin cloak.Jestyn and Thormod form a bond, cemented by an act of loyalty exceeding that of a thrall, and when Thormod sails for Scandinavia in the spring, he frees Jestyn who accompanies him Their relationship is a mixture of bromance and sibling There may or may not be some sexual undertones to Jestyn s feelings for Thormod, but I interpreted them as being that Thormod was the only person since his mother whom Jestyn had found to love or to whom felt any connection As someone who was very aloof, and often an outsider, Jestyn formed very few attachments His only friendship during his time in the Saxon community with one of the herding dogs His relationship with Thormod fulfilled a deep need for human contact.Thormod arrives home only to discover his father had been recently murdered by the sons of a neighboring family He swears vengeance, vowing to follow his father s killers all the way to Constantinople if need be Jestyn cannot bear to be parted from Thormod and takes up the blood feud on his behalf Together they sail to Kiev and then Constantinople where the feud is finally ended and where Jestyn gets an extremely unlikely happily ever after.The writing is excellent as Sutcliff s writing always is She also does a good job of explaining the rationale for a blood feud that makes it seem perfectly reasonable for the parties involved instead of ignorant and barbaric The beginning of the book really draws the reader in However, once the story reached Constantinople, I found the plot to be far fetched and particularly weak view spoiler The story fell flat for me when Jestyn remained in Constantinople and trained to be a doctor I like there to be a happy ending but not one beyond all reason In The Witch s Brat by Rosemary Sutcliff, Lovel becoming a doctor made sense within the story He was raised by a grandmother who was a practicing herbalist When he entered the monastery, his first obedience was to assist the brother who tended the medicinal herb garden He then served in the monastery s infirmary in an increasingly greater capacity But Jestyn s progression from cattle herd to oarsman to mercenary soldier to assistant wound dresser to physician is illogical I would have preferred aprobable ending such as Jestyn going back Thormod s family s compound in Scandinavia or Kievan Rus and returning animal husbandry or entering a different butlikely trade Even if he d stayed in Byzantium and worked as a laborer at Demetriades farm, the ending would have beensatisfying It made no sense that Demetriades the Physician would be so willing to take Jestyn into his household let alone train him in medicine Then within a year, Jestyn is reading Homer in the original Greek as well as scholarly books on medicine Since Jestyn was raised bilingual in English and Saxon, I accepted that he could pick up Norse and then solider s Greek, but having an illiterate man being able to read Greek in just over a year s part time is too much even for me hide spoiler I was delighted by the cameo by Vladimir the Great As an ethnic Slav and Orthodox Christian, I found his portrayal to be spot on He was a man who was both terrible and magnificent, of the old gods and the new He was a man who makes his own rules as well as a brutal, shrewd, and charismatic military leader I loved that the author held true to the traditional story behind Vladimir s conversation to Christianity, explaining that he abandoned paganism as backward and embraced one of the up and coming monotheistic religions to elevate his kingdom The reason Prince Vladimir chose Orthodoxy over Islam was as simple asa faith which forbids a man his drink is clearly no faith for the Northmen The author does, however, overplay the Scandinavian portion in the population and downplay the native tribal peoples living around Kievan Rus in my estimation, but that s with sticking to the Slavs own story of their bloodline, which may not be historical accurate

  10. Julian Daventry says:

    This is probably my second favorite Rosemary Sutcliff book The Eagle of the Ninth will always be the BEST , though, because of the small size of my paperback copy, it is the one I take with my everywhere It s the one I read because I have little favorite parts, because I love the characters, because I love the story itself.I don t even know exactly what it is about this book that I like, quite frankly Just something, when I m done reading it, makes me go Yeah.that was good It s fairly cl This is probably my second favorite Rosemary Sutcliff book The Eagle of the Ninth will always be the BEST , though, because of the small size of my paperback copy, it is the one I take with my everywhere It s the one I read because I have little favorite parts, because I love the characters, because I love the story itself.I don t even know exactly what it is about this book that I like, quite frankly Just something, when I m done reading it, makes me go Yeah.that was good It s fairly clean, though maybe a touch gruesome in a few descriptions But those were darker times, and also, when you re a healer, sometimes you have to deal with nasty stuff But if you love stories of friendship, of adventure, of Vikings, of revenge, thisthis is a good one

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