Riding the Black Ship: Japan and Tokyo Disneyland



Riding the Black Ship: Japan and Tokyo DisneylandIn 1996 Over 16 Million People Visited Tokyo Disneyland, Making It The Most Popular Of The Many Theme Parks In Japan Since It Opened In 1983, Tokyo Disneyland Has Been Analyzed Mainly As An Example Of The Globalization Of The American Leisure Industry And Its Organizational Culture, Particularly The Company Manual By Looking At How Tokyo Disneyland Is Experienced By Employees, Management, And Visitors, Aviad Raz Shows That It Is Much An Example Of Successful Importation, Adaptation, And Domestication And That It Has Succeeded Precisely Because It Has Become Japanese Even While Marketing Itself As Foreign Rather Than Being An Agent Of Americanization, Tokyo Disneyland Is A Simulated America Showcased By And For The Japanese It Is An America With A Japanese Meaning.

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Riding the Black Ship: Japan and Tokyo Disneyland book, this is one of the most wanted Aviad E. Raz author readers around the world.

[Ebook] ➠ Riding the Black Ship: Japan and Tokyo Disneyland ➦ Aviad E. Raz – Heartforum.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 264 pages
  • Riding the Black Ship: Japan and Tokyo Disneyland
  • Aviad E. Raz
  • English
  • 09 August 2017
  • 0674768949

10 thoughts on “Riding the Black Ship: Japan and Tokyo Disneyland

  1. Essie says:

    This book looked at Tokyo Disneyland from three angles, onstage the spectacle and marketing , backstage the company and its workers , and offstage reception I read the sections concerned with onstage and offstage as my research interests are less concerned with business management I chose to read this book in order to consider some aspects of cultural imperialism, domestication, and national identities in the Japanese leisure market On that end, it was thought provoking, but the arguments This book looked at Tokyo Disneyland from three angles, onstage the spectacle and marketing , backstage the company and its workers , and offstage reception I read the sections concerned with onstage and offstage as my research interests are less concerned with business management I chose to read this book in order to consider some aspects of cultural imperialism, domestication, and national identities in the Japanese leisure market On that end, it was thought provoking, but the arguments did not delve very deep into cultural imperialism and domestication.Superficially, the organization is fairly straightforward, but the content of the chapters is not well structured or signposted Additionally, it may be in part that the Black Ship sakoku narrative is problematic to me as an historian, but I found the analogy distracting and not productive Its stated purpose was as a symbol of cultural imperialism however, the author arguesthat TDL is a case of distorted cultural imperialism, with the Japanese imperialists as consumers of western products This is meant to be Riding the Black Ship but that metaphor is never sufficiently expanded on I also find some of his assertions weak, particularly regarding Meet the World as he is unable to bring forwardthan hearsay as evidence for who actually developed the attraction, TDL or EPCOT Another discussion that would have benefited fromfacets was TDL and Disney theme parks in general as constructed leisure environments and their reception Rather than simply attacking the parks as places reminiscent of Brave New World, though without doubt they are that, approaching their use as informed, willful submission to control as a form of leisure would have been an interesting juxtoposition.Though I do not fully agree with his analysis of reception, particularly among youth in Japan, which may have to do with the publication date of the book and my own biases, I would recommend section III for anyone interested on the issues of youth culture, burikko, Lolita complex, and kawaii as one way to look at those issues

  2. Micah says:

    This book was written before Disney added a second park in Tokyo, so that s important to note Overall the book is good, but it doesn t go as deep as I would have liked It strays into areas I personally didn t have a lot of interest in That isn t a criticism of the book itself, just effected my enjoyment of it.Not terribly academic in it s language which is a positive , but it often feels a bit academic in it s writing style, and I think it could ve beenfun.

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