Miracle Country

Miracle Country➻ Miracle Country Download ➼ Author Kendra Atleework – Heartforum.co.uk Kendra Atleework grew up in Swall Meadows, in the Owens Valley of the Eastern Sierra Nevada, where annual rainfall averages five inches and in drought years measures closer to zero Kendra s family rai Kendra Atleework grew up in Swall Meadows, in the Owens Valley of the Eastern Sierra Nevada, where annual rainfall averages five inches and in drought years measures closer to zero Kendra s family raised their children to thrive in this harsh landscape, forever at the mercy of wildfires, blizzards, and gale force winds Most of all, the Atleework children were raised on unconditional love and delight in the natural world But it came at a price When Kendra was six, her mother was diagnosed with a rare autoimmune disease, and she died when Kendra was sixteen Her family fell apart, even as her father tried to keep them together Kendra took flight from her bereft family, escaping to the enemy city of Los Angeles, and then Minneapolis, land of all trees, no deserts, no droughts, full lakes, water everywhere you look But after years of avoiding the pain of her hometown, she realized that she had to go back, that the desert was the only place she could live Like Wild, Miracle Country is a story of flight and return, bounty and emptiness, and the true meaning of home But it also speaks to the ravages of climate change and its permanent destruction of the way of life in one particular town.

KENDRA ATLEEWORK was born and raised on the dry edge of California at the eastern base of the Sierra Nevada mountains She moved away for eleven years, mostly spent being homesick and researching the place she left behind the product of which is Miracle Country She has an MFA from the University of Minnesota and serves on the board of the Ellen Meloy Fund for Desert Writers She lives in her hometown of Bishop, California.

Hardcover  ´ Miracle Country eBook Ä
  • Hardcover
  • 368 pages
  • Miracle Country
  • Kendra Atleework
  • English
  • 09 June 2019
  • 1616209984

10 thoughts on “Miracle Country

  1. Clio says:

    I feel like I don t have the words to begin how to describe how I feel about this book The way the author weaves the past and the present is effortless The book reminds us the we can not move forward without remember what came before and holdsour hand through California s history Challenging us to take responsibility for our place in time, while opening the curtain into her own life The author brings up the questions of home can our home ever really be our own And at the same time how c I feel like I don t have the words to begin how to describe how I feel about this book The way the author weaves the past and the present is effortless The book reminds us the we can not move forward without remember what came before and holdsour hand through California s history Challenging us to take responsibility for our place in time, while opening the curtain into her own life The author brings up the questions of home can our home ever really be our own And at the same time how can it not be I cannot recommend this book enough Atleework has her finger to the pulse of the present while not letting us forget what has come before

  2. James Wade says:

    An incredibly beautiful, moving memoir, seamlessly weaving the author s own history with that of the Owens Valley Atleework writes about the loss of her mother in a way that is poetic and unflinching She captures the magic and the danger of the Eastern Sierra Nevada, the vulnerability of being a young adult, and the remarkable wonder of our ability to keep going forward even when we don t realize our feet are moving MIRACLE COUNTRY is inspiring and heartbreaking I suspect time will prove it An incredibly beautiful, moving memoir, seamlessly weaving the author s own history with that of the Owens Valley Atleework writes about the loss of her mother in a way that is poetic and unflinching She captures the magic and the danger of the Eastern Sierra Nevada, the vulnerability of being a young adult, and the remarkable wonder of our ability to keep going forward even when we don t realize our feet are moving MIRACLE COUNTRY is inspiring and heartbreaking I suspect time will prove it s also unforgettable

  3. ☕️Hélène⚜️ says:

    It is difficult for me to review a memoir since this is a personal book about the authors life but I will do my best.A memoir that is powerful in describing the rough landscape The drought, heat, wild fires, etc can t imagine living in that kind of extreme environment Thank you Algonquin the invitation To this Blog Tour, Kendra Atleework and NetGalley for this arc in exchange of an honest review

  4. Sharon says:

    I lived for 40 years in the rain shadow of the Sierras and fully understand Kendra s love for the raw beauty that comes with this country What they called the Sierra Wave we called the Washoe Zephyr, because you need a name to make friends with such a violent beast It drives the weather and it drives wildfire But most of all it s big and it s beautiful When you fall in love with the high desert, you fall deep The place of Kendra s story is as important as is her family s story, and her deep I lived for 40 years in the rain shadow of the Sierras and fully understand Kendra s love for the raw beauty that comes with this country What they called the Sierra Wave we called the Washoe Zephyr, because you need a name to make friends with such a violent beast It drives the weather and it drives wildfire But most of all it s big and it s beautiful When you fall in love with the high desert, you fall deep The place of Kendra s story is as important as is her family s story, and her deep love of both is beautifully rendered Yearly we drove to SoCal to spend New Years with family, and depending on the snow conditions, might spend the night at a Best Western in Lone Pine, but regardless, it was always a relief to arrive in Bishop It was a shock to see the carcass of Owens Lake, and it was a point of celebration when Mono Lake was allotted enough water to cover the land bridge, denying predators access to nesting sites on the islands.The theft of the Valley s water and lifeblood is unquestionably unfair, but when my young self would petulantly tell my mother that something was unfair, she d reply whoever told you life was fair The greatest good for the greatest number is a recurring theme in the book, and anyone not in the greatest numbers knows it s not fair, but nevertheless there it is, and it s a recurring theme in water rights in the Arid West The greatest good for the greatest number rationalized the attempted eradication of American Indians to make room for frontier settlers The Homestead Act of 1862 offered free land to hopeful homesteaders if they met the qualifications after five years, but it was free because the surviving Indians were relocated to settlement camps called reservations That said, there would be no Los Angeles or homesteading without employing the greatest good for the greatest number ethic Not fair Kendra quoted a number of prominent environmentalist authors, and if she keeps writing like this, we might one day be quoting her

  5. Sarah Prendergast (lifeandbookswithme) says:

    Kendra Atleework describes her family s struggles as they live in a remote part of the California desert They fight against elements extreme drought fires and navigate her mother s early death at the age of fifty two Her siblings struggle in their own ways and Kendra flees the Eastern Sierra, in search of peace while at college in Los Angeles After a few moves across states, she realizes the only place she will ever feel at home is in Swallow She returns home and begins anew as she comes Kendra Atleework describes her family s struggles as they live in a remote part of the California desert They fight against elements extreme drought fires and navigate her mother s early death at the age of fifty two Her siblings struggle in their own ways and Kendra flees the Eastern Sierra, in search of peace while at college in Los Angeles After a few moves across states, she realizes the only place she will ever feel at home is in Swallow She returns home and begins anew as she comes to terms with her identity as she is shaped by the landscapes around her.I thought this memoir did an excellent job of capturing the essence of each of Kendra s family members I really enjoyed her retelling of stories that depicted her mother and father s journeys as well as her two siblings I did find it a bit difficult at times to follow as it s non linear The personal story is often interjected with quite a bit of history about the area and sometimes it hops back and forth in time without much notice I am discovering that I really prefer memoirs that are written in chronological order and this is the main reason for the rating I gave this book The theme of survival and resilience is woven in seamlessly as Atleework explains the challenges her parents faced by choosing to settle down in the Eastern Sierra Thank you to netgalley and algonquinbooks for the ARC

  6. Angela Dee { angelas.bookshelf } says:

    I really enjoyed this memoir About returning home, overcoming painful memories and finding out where you truly belong She was raised in survive and thrive in the harsh landscape of Eastern Sierra Nevada She experienced things like drought, wildfire and crazy winds When she was 16 years old, her mother passed away and the family fell apart Kendra then decides to breakaway to LA then to Minneapolis, two landscapes very different than what she grew up with.She eventuality feels the need to ret I really enjoyed this memoir About returning home, overcoming painful memories and finding out where you truly belong She was raised in survive and thrive in the harsh landscape of Eastern Sierra Nevada She experienced things like drought, wildfire and crazy winds When she was 16 years old, her mother passed away and the family fell apart Kendra then decides to breakaway to LA then to Minneapolis, two landscapes very different than what she grew up with.She eventuality feels the need to return home to overcome her past and find a true meaning of home This book is about losing, then finding yourself and the complexities of family.Thank you to Algonquin Books and Kendra Atleewood for providing me with an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review

  7. Madeline says:

    Close to a 4.5 Full review to come close to pub day Miracle Country is an atmospheric, and layered memoir that blends wistful nature writing with Kendra Atleework s experience growing up, losing her mother, leaving, and eventually returning to the landscape that just wouldn t let her go Atleework grew up in Owens Valley, a dry and arid area that is east of the Sierra Nevada mountain range The Owens River runs through the valley and provides water to communities that would otherwise have d Close to a 4.5 Full review to come close to pub day Miracle Country is an atmospheric, and layered memoir that blends wistful nature writing with Kendra Atleework s experience growing up, losing her mother, leaving, and eventually returning to the landscape that just wouldn t let her go Atleework grew up in Owens Valley, a dry and arid area that is east of the Sierra Nevada mountain range The Owens River runs through the valley and provides water to communities that would otherwise have disappeared long ago I always find it interesting to see how people define themselves, and in this memoir Atleework uses the landscape of Owens Valley to do so The landscape is integral in her writing, and is fused to the story Atleework tells of her family, from how her parents met to her wandering path from, and back to, Owens Valley The nature writing is quite beautiful and is easy to immerse yourself in The love that Atleework holds for her home is evident in the care with which she writes I especially appreciated how Atleework weaves in historical narrative to her own examination of the land she grew up on She integrates quotes from famous nature writers who spent time in Owens Valley, and interviews and stories of the native Paiute tribe that has lived in Owens Valley for years Atleework s historical musings serve to ground her individual story in the larger context of Owens Valley, where water has been fought over for centuries Atleework honors the history of the Paiute people, and is honest about the injustices that white settlers committed against their people She delves into the fraught history of water in Owens Valley, where Los Angeles has been siphoning off much of the water found in the valley for the last century These events have served to create an underlying tension and passion that only matches the arid climate Atleework writes about, where a single spark can start a fire.At once a story of finding yourself and growing up, this is also a story of Owens Valley and a family who was as much inspired by it as it was formed by it Atleework s memoir is full of beauty, passion, love, hardship, and forgiveness Thank you to Algonquin Books for providing me with an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review TW for loss of a parent

  8. Nancy says:

    The Eastern Sierra is a land of wild winds and wildfires In 1892, Mary Austin arrived at the Eastern Sierra and wrote, You will find it forsaken of most things but beauty and madness and death and God Once Paiute harvested fields of wild rye and love grass, before ranchers arrived to summer their stock The cattle devoured the crops and the First People starved Bill Mulholland stole lake water to grow Los Angeles Drought depletes the wells while the streams are diverted to LA.A woman from t The Eastern Sierra is a land of wild winds and wildfires In 1892, Mary Austin arrived at the Eastern Sierra and wrote, You will find it forsaken of most things but beauty and madness and death and God Once Paiute harvested fields of wild rye and love grass, before ranchers arrived to summer their stock The cattle devoured the crops and the First People starved Bill Mulholland stole lake water to grow Los Angeles Drought depletes the wells while the streams are diverted to LA.A woman from the Great Lakes and a man from the California coast were drawn to the sublimity of the high desert They met in a band and went on a hike They birthed two girls and adopted a brown skinned son.It s hard to know how to fix a smashed world at sixteen, at fourteen, at eleven from Miracle Country by Kendra AtleeworkTheir idyllic life was smashed with their matriarch s early death, spiraling the children into their private hells from which their father could not save them.Atleework left for LA and then the MidWest The hills burned The dust blew arsenic Her father s well dried up But the beauty of Atleework s homeland brought her back from her wanderings.Whiskey s for drinking Water s for fighting over from Miracle Country by Kendra AttleeworkThe environmental cost for the growth of cities is central to the story and raises ethical questions about water rights We live in a landscape damaged beyond repair, Atleework writes, and we see our loss magnified the world over The story of water in Owens Valleywas a sad story of wrong done, a near tall tale with a suit coated villian and cowboy herons from Miracle Country by Kendra AtleeworkThe valley s discovery by American soldiers and the settlers eager to displace or annihilate the native people is the story of European attitudes that built the country while also destroying it.Atleework s Miracle Country was a pleasure to read, gorgeous in prose, intimate as a memoir, and wide ranging in its portrait of a land and its people Highly recommended.I was given a free ebook by the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for a fair and unbiased review

  9. Laila says:

    Rating 3.5 stars Miracle Country is a memoir about growing up in the California desert, and about what home means in the context of family and a harsh landscape.Having lived in the Southwest for a lot of my life, I already have an affinity for the desert While I connect with the beauty and the rawness of such places, I feel that the particular area Atleework grew up in has a different context because of its proximity to Los Angeles and that history of water conflict She delves deeply into the Rating 3.5 stars Miracle Country is a memoir about growing up in the California desert, and about what home means in the context of family and a harsh landscape.Having lived in the Southwest for a lot of my life, I already have an affinity for the desert While I connect with the beauty and the rawness of such places, I feel that the particular area Atleework grew up in has a different context because of its proximity to Los Angeles and that history of water conflict She delves deeply into the history of the region and the issue of water rights, dams and pipelines To be honest, those parts dragged a bit for me, but I like that she included some voices of Native communities from the area I thought the exploration of the idea of home was interesting how she kind of has a love hate relationship with the valley, but also did not feel at home anywhere else I liked the parts about her family members, and how the harsh desert and the death of her mother shaped them all in different ways I think the interweaving of personal history with regional history got a little confusing, but was an interesting approach Atleework s writing was at times powerful and poetic, and conveys her conflicted emotions about the place she calls home There were some beautiful descriptions of nature, both in her words and through other writers This is a good choice for readers who enjoy poetic memoirs, and have an appreciation for nature Thank you to Algonquin Books and NetGalley for providing this review copy

  10. Kate says:

    I really enjoyed this memoir Atleework weaves past and present seamlessly A memoir about returning home, overcoming painful pasts and finding where you truly belong Raised to thrive in the severe climate of Eastern Sierra Nevada Atleework knows the realities of drought, wildfires, and crazy winds When she was 16 her mother died and the family fell apart We then see Kendra break away to L.A and then Minneapolis, where the landscapes were opposite to where she grew up Eventually she feels t I really enjoyed this memoir Atleework weaves past and present seamlessly A memoir about returning home, overcoming painful pasts and finding where you truly belong Raised to thrive in the severe climate of Eastern Sierra Nevada Atleework knows the realities of drought, wildfires, and crazy winds When she was 16 her mother died and the family fell apart We then see Kendra break away to L.A and then Minneapolis, where the landscapes were opposite to where she grew up Eventually she feels the pull to return to her desert home, to overcome her past and find the true meaning of home This book was reminiscent of Cheryl Strayed s memoir Wild About losing and finding yourself, the complexities and love of family, but also about the realities and affects climate change can have on people Thank You to the publisher for sending me this book opinions are my own Forof my book content check out instagram.com bookalong

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