The Biggest Bluff: How I Learned to Pay Attention, Take Control and Win

The Biggest Bluff: How I Learned to Pay Attention, Take Control and Win✽ [EPUB] ✵ The Biggest Bluff: How I Learned to Pay Attention, Take Control and Win By Maria Konnikova ❧ – Heartforum.co.uk The New York Times bestseller!

The tale of how Konnikova followed a story about poker players and wound up becoming a story herself will have you riveted, first as you learn about her big wi The New York Times bestseller! The Bluff: How MOBI · tale of how Konnikova followed a story about poker players and wound up becoming a story herself will have you riveted, first as you learn about her big winnings, and then as she conveys the lessons she learned both about human nature and herself The Washington PostIt's true that Maria Konnikova had never actually played poker before and didn't even know the rules when she The Biggest MOBI :Ä approached Erik Seidel, Poker Hall of Fame inductee and winner of tens of millions of dollars in earnings, and convinced him to be her mentor But she knew her man: a famously thoughtful and broadminded player, he was intrigued by her pitch that she wasn't interested in making money so much as learning about life She had faced a stretch of personal bad luck, and her reflections on the role of chance Biggest Bluff: How eBook ✓ had led her to a giant of game theory, who pointed her to poker as the ultimate master class in learning to distinguish between what can be controlled and what can't And she certainly brought something to the table, including a PhD in psychology and an acclaimed and growing body of work on human behavior and how to hack it So Seidel was in, and soon she was down the rabbit hole with him, into the wild, fiercely competitive, overwhelmingly masculine world of highstakes Texas Hold'em, their initial end point the following year's World Series of PokerBut then something extraordinary happened Under Seidel's guidance, Konnikova did have many epiphanies about life that derived from her new pursuit, including how to better read, not just her opponents but far importantly herself; how to identify what tilted her into an emotional state that got in the way of good decisions; and how to get to a place where she could accept luck for what it was, and what it wasn't But she also began to win And win In a little over a year, she began making earnest money from tournaments, ultimately totaling hundreds of thousands of dollars She won a major title, got a sponsor, and got used to being on television, and to headlines like How one writer's book deal turned her into a professional poker player She even learned to like Las VegasBut in the end, Maria Konnikova is a writer and student of human behavior, and ultimately the point was to render her incredible journey into a container for its invaluable lessons The biggest bluff of all, she learned, is that skill is enough Bad cards will come our way, but keeping our focus on how we play them and not on the outcome will keep us moving through many a dark patch, until the luck once again breaks our way.

Is a well known author, some Bluff: How MOBI · of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Biggest Bluff: How I Learned to Pay Attention, Take Control and Win book, this is one of the most wanted Maria Konnikova author readers around the world.

The Biggest Bluff: How I Learned to Pay Attention, Take
    The Biggest Bluff: How I Learned to Pay Attention, Take with him, into the wild, fiercely competitive, overwhelmingly masculine world of highstakes Texas Hold'em, their initial end point the following year's World Series of PokerBut then something extraordinary happened Under Seidel's guidance, Konnikova did have many epiphanies about life that derived from her new pursuit, including how to better read, not just her opponents but far importantly herself; how to identify what tilted her into an emotional state that got in the way of good decisions; and how to get to a place where she could accept luck for what it was, and what it wasn't But she also began to win And win In a little over a year, she began making earnest money from tournaments, ultimately totaling hundreds of thousands of dollars She won a major title, got a sponsor, and got used to being on television, and to headlines like How one writer's book deal turned her into a professional poker player She even learned to like Las VegasBut in the end, Maria Konnikova is a writer and student of human behavior, and ultimately the point was to render her incredible journey into a container for its invaluable lessons The biggest bluff of all, she learned, is that skill is enough Bad cards will come our way, but keeping our focus on how we play them and not on the outcome will keep us moving through many a dark patch, until the luck once again breaks our way."/>
  • Hardcover
  • 368 pages
  • The Biggest Bluff: How I Learned to Pay Attention, Take Control and Win
  • Maria Konnikova
  • 06 May 2019
  • 9780525522621

10 thoughts on “The Biggest Bluff: How I Learned to Pay Attention, Take Control and Win

  1. Shane Parrish says:

    Most real-world environments are ... wicked: there's a mismatch between action and feedback because of external noise. Activities with elements of surprise, uncertainty, the unknown: suddenly, you're not sure whether what you've learned is accurate or not, accurately executed or not. There's simply too much going on. ... But despite all this, one thing is undoubtedly true: while practice is not enough and there's not even close to a magic number for its effectiveness, you also cannot learn if you do not practice. If you're serious about thing—playing chess, writing a book, becoming an astronaut, playing poker—you have to learn the composite skills. No one is so naturally gifted that they can just get up and go. Even Mozart needed some lessons.

    We tend to think of meta skills as the skill. For example, we default to thinking that reading is a skill. But there is really no skill called reading. Reading is the meta-skill that results when you alloy other skills together. You need to know the alphabet, how letter form words, how words have meaning, how words together have meaning, and so on. So often we focus on the meta-skill and not the sub-skills.

  2. David Epstein says:

    Disclaimer: I can't recall reading anything by Maria Konnikova — whether articles in The New Yorker or her other books — that I didn't think was either good, really good, or great. I like her writing style, her thinking style, and I like the topics she's drawn to. I also know her personally. But we came to know each other because of our mutual interests in topics like cognitive biases, talent, skill acquisition, judgment and decision making, and the balance of luck versus skill in various endeavors.

    So, with that disclaimer out of the way, it's probably no surprise that I tore through this book on cognitive biases, skill acquisition, decision making, and the balance of luck and skill. I read a review somewhere that described The Biggest Bluff as like a George Plimpton participatory journalism project, except instead of just the enthralling narrative, you also get explanations of the science behind the story you're reading. I think that's a pretty darn good description.

    The story itself is pretty wild. Having never played a game of poker — not even knowing how many cards are in a deck — Konnikova sets out to try to make the World Series of Poker (a $10,000 entry fee) with one year of training. As the book explains early on, she isn't particularly interested in poker initially, but decides to pursue it after a mathematician's book on game theory convinces her that it's the ideal practical crucible for examining the psychology of risk and of balancing luck and skill while trying to learn something new.

    Konnikova has a psychology PhD (she was a graduate student under the guy who did the world famous marshmallow test), and it's fascinating to see her describe psychological research in the lab, and then write about the extent to which she can or can't actually use that knowledge at the poker table. One lesson is clear: being smart and having a PhD doesn't exempt you from the cognitive biases you studied in graduate school.

    She gets off to a turbulent start as a player, but it's not a spoiler to say that her winnings ultimately reach well into six figures. ...I'm going to come back and add more to this review later, but I think this is an excellent book for anyone who wants to spend some time inside the head of a pure beginner who is trying to reconcile academic science, with real world risk, while navigating her own cognitive foibles. It's a lot messier than the sort of book that promises a simple bullet point list for success and contentment, but it has the advantage of being true.

  3. Gretchen Rubin says:

    A fascinating memoir about learning to play poker, and the larger lessons of the undertaking.

  4. David Yoon says:

    There was little doubt that I was going to pick up this book given my love of Texas Hold'Em — but Maria Konnikova's latest isn't some poker guide to get you to the WSOP. It's part memoir, self-help guide and business read from an accomplished non-fiction author and regular contributor to the New Yorker who happens to hold a Ph.D. in psychology.

    She will dedicate herself to mastering the game under the tutelage of Poker Hall of Famer Erik Seidel and a host of other poker luminaries. She will make the trek into New Jersey to camp at coffee shops to play online, building up to runs in Las Vegas, Monte Carlo and Macau. But the hook, the reason you should read this even if you don't know what wins between Broadway and the nut flush, is it's all about poker as insight.

    In poker, as in life, you are forced to make tough decisions armed with imperfect information. And to the careful observer, how we think through these problems hand by hand reveals a lot about your personality, your baggage, your biases, and more.

    Erik Seidel early on gives Maria two critical words of advice: Pay Attention. Less certainty, more inquiry. Question everything, stay open minded and adjust as needed. Relevant on and off the felt, especially in this fraught and fearful moment. There are no perfect answers. It's about finding comfort in, and living with that uncertainty. And accepting that you can do everything right and still lose. That chance and fate are always lurking in the background ready to flush us down the river when we least expect it. I mean Maria was supposed to launch this book to coincide with her run at the 2020 World Series of Poker. A perfect marketing one-two punch that ran head first into a worldwide pandemic that had other plans.

    You assess and readjust. No bad beats allowed. Good poker demands you shake it off, stay focused and continue to make strong decisions based on available information. Steer clear of superstition, notions of what you're due for, and staying blind to your own biases. Good poker play models effective behaviours in the real world. I'm all in.

  5. Harold says:

    Maria Konnikova, a writer for the New Yorker, and a PhD in Psychology, went on a mission to learn poker. With a reporter’s curiosity, a psychologist knowledge, and a sharp committed intellect she became a pro, and even won a tournament. The lesson, pay attention. It’s a great lesson. I read the book carefully, but I didn’t learn much more no matter how much attention I paid.

    This is the second book I read by a PhD in psychology devoted to poker (both women incidentally). The other book, Thinking in Bets by Annie Duke was a better book, I’ll bet by a better poker player. Pay attention to that one!

  6. John says:

    I felt information overload from this book. The angle is psychology defined through poker and poker analysis. Interesting premise, though, of someone who did not know how to play poker, but learned rapidly enough to compete at the highest level.

  7. Artur Lascala says:

    I like poker. I like psychology. I like decision theory. The book does bring excellent insights on those three topics. However, the narrative was a bit of a drag. All in all, a decent read, but I felt relieved when I finished it...

  8. Harry Beckwith says:

    Interesting, but my God this woman cannot write--or,
    as she probably would put it, cannot write to save her neck.

    Riddled with cliches and filler like that, and she fails at setting up suspense well.
    There's a much better story here, in need of a much better story teller.

    She writes for The New Yorker?

    Maria, hire an editor.

  9. Biblio Files (takingadayoff) says:

    I chose this book purely because of Maria Konnikova's name on the cover. I love her reporting, her combination of brainy science and the psychology of outsmarting others. Naturally I was interested in her book about con merchants, The Confidence Game. For The Biggest Bluff, she didn't just interview her subjects, she threw herself into the topic and became a poker player. And not just a poker player, but a poker champion.

    Konnikova started at the very beginning -- she didn't even know how many cards were in a standard deck. But, she also started by finding the best instructor, a champion poker player who was intrigued by her project. Working her way up through friendly games and computer poker, she progressed to serious games and internet poker. Along the way she noted the psychological aspects of the game, which are what many argue, make poker not just a game of chance, but a game of skill.

    The jargon gets heavy at times, for those of us who aren't poker players, but I did find myself getting wrapped up in the drama of the game. And of course, poker has lessons about decision making that are useful well beyond the game. Quite an exciting and revealing ride! (Thanks to Edelweiss and Penguin Press for a digital review copy.)

  10. Courtney says:

    I was so excited to read this book since Konnikova is my favorite science writer and this book didn't disappoint. It's a blend of memoir and science writing (mostly psychology with some econ thrown in) and even though I barely know anything about poker (but a lot about psychology), I really enjoyed it. She intersperses research, poker tips, and her own experience seamlessly, and I especially liked her analysis of her own decision-making shortfalls and connecting those deficits to things in the research (especially things she had studied herself). It's a solid book to read a chapter at a time, and I'd recommend it to anyone who is looking for science writing or a book about learning poker.
    I received an ARC in exchange for an honest review!

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