Trinity

Trinity[PDF / Epub] ☀ Trinity By Leon Uris – Heartforum.co.uk Leon Uris s beloved Irish classic, available in Avon mass market From the acclaimed author who enthralled the world with Exodus, Battle Cry, QB VII, Topaz, and other beloved classics of twentieth cent Leon Uris s beloved Irish classic, available in Avon mass market From the acclaimed author who enthralled the world with Exodus, Battle Cry, QB VII, Topaz, and other beloved classics of twentieth century fiction comes a sweeping and powerful epic adventure that captures the terrible beauty of Ireland during its long and bloody struggle for freedom It is the electrifying story of an idealistic young Catholic rebel and the valiant and beautiful Protestant girl who defied her heritage to join his cause It is a tale of love and danger, of triumph at an unthinkable cost a magnificent portrait of a people divided by class, faith, and prejudice an unforgettable saga of the fires that devastated a majestic land and the unquenchable flames that burn in the human heart.

Leon Marcus Uris August , June , was an American novelist, known for his historical fiction and the deep research that went into his novels His two bestselling books were Exodus, published in , and Trinity, in Leon Uris was born in Balti, Maryland, the son of Jewish American parents Wolf William and Anna Blumberg Uris His father, a Polish born immigrant, was a paperhanger, then a storekeeper William spent a year in Palestine after World War I before entering the United States He derived his surname from Yerushalmi, meaning man of Jerusalem His brother Aron, Leon Uris uncle, took the name Yerushalmi He was basically a failure, Uris later said of his father He went from failure to failure Uris attended schools in Norfolk, Virginia and Balti, but never graduated from high school, after having failed English three times At age seventeen, while in his senior year of high school, the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor and Uris enlisted in the United States Marine Corps He served in the South Pacific as a radioman in combat at Guadalcanal, Tarawa, and New Zealand from through While recuperating from malaria in San Francisco, he met Betty Beck, a Marine sergeant they married in Coming out of the service, he worked for a newspaper, writing in his spare time In , Esquire magazine bought an article, and he began to devote himself to writingseriously Drawing on his experiences in Guadalcanal and Tarawa he produced the best selling, Battle Cry, a novel depicting the toughness and courage of US Marines in the Pacific He then went to Warner Brothers in Hollywood helping to write the movie, which was extremely popular with the public, if not the critics Later he went on to write The Angry Hills, a novel set in war time GreeceAccording to one source, in the early s he was hired by an American public relations firm to go to Israel and soak up the atmosphere and create a novel about it That novel would be Exodus, which came out in and became his best known work Others say that Uris, motivated by an intense interest in Israel, financed his own research for the novel by selling the film rights in advance to MGM and writing articles about the Sinai campaign It is said that the book involved two years of research, and involved thousands of interviews Exodus illustrated the history of Palestine from the late th century through the founding of the state of Israel in It was a worldwide best seller, translated into a dozen languages, and was made into a feature film in , starring Paul Newman, directed by Otto Preminger, as well as into a short lived Broadway musical previews, performances in Uris novel Topaz was adapted for the screen and directed by Alfred HitchcockUris subsequent works included Mila , a story of the Warsaw ghetto uprising Armageddon A Novel of Berlin, which reveals the detailed work by British and American intelligence services in planning for the occupation and pacification of post WWII Germany Trinity, an epic novel about Ireland s struggle for independence QB VII, a novel about the role of a Polish doctor in a German concentration camp and The Haj, with insights into the history of the Middle East and the secret machinations of foreigners which have led to today s turmoilHe also wrote the screenplays for Battle Cry and Gunfight at the OK CorralUris was married three times to Betty Beck, with whom he had three children, from through their divorce in Margery Edwards in , who died a year later, and Jill Peabody in , with whom he had two children, and divorced in Leon Uris died of renal failure at his Long Island home on Shelter Island, aged Leon Uris s papers can be found at the Ransom Center, University of Texas in Austin The collection includes all of Uris s novels, with the exception of The Haj and Mitla Pass, as well as manus.

Trinity Epub Ä Paperback
    Trinity Epub Ä Paperback Ireland during its long and bloody struggle for freedom It is the electrifying story of an idealistic young Catholic rebel and the valiant and beautiful Protestant girl who defied her heritage to join his cause It is a tale of love and danger, of triumph at an unthinkable cost a magnificent portrait of a people divided by class, faith, and prejudice an unforgettable saga of the fires that devastated a majestic land and the unquenchable flames that burn in the human heart."/>
  • Paperback
  • 912 pages
  • Trinity
  • Leon Uris
  • 01 August 2017
  • 0060827882

10 thoughts on “Trinity

  1. Jennifer says:

    This is one of the select few on my bookshelves that I ve bothered to readthan once quite a feat, as the book is roughly 800 pages or so and has got to be one of my top five, if not my absolute favorite book of all time This is the first Uris book I read, and I became an instant fan Leon Uris is a masterful story teller who irrevokably draws you in to his tales, and this one is about 19th century Ireland in which several decades of Irish history are woven into the stories of three fami This is one of the select few on my bookshelves that I ve bothered to readthan once quite a feat, as the book is roughly 800 pages or so and has got to be one of my top five, if not my absolute favorite book of all time This is the first Uris book I read, and I became an instant fan Leon Uris is a masterful story teller who irrevokably draws you in to his tales, and this one is about 19th century Ireland in which several decades of Irish history are woven into the stories of three families seamlessly The only minor negative I can think of is that the story is a bit one sided, but as you read, you find yourself believing that the rebels cause is a righteous one Action, drama, suspense, romance, history, this book has a bit of everything I m also not one to get all that emotional when reading books, but the last chapter Oh my Keep the kleenex handy Make sure you read the sequel,Redemptionto find out what happens to the characters I don t recommend it as highly, but it brings the story line inTrinityto a close

  2. Linda C says:

    I loved this book and have read probably six times Great love story and great historical fiction at the same time The first review on Goodreads really panned this book and all of Leon Uris books in general do NOT believe that review or his comments about other Uris books, in particular Exodus This person s comments were basically that the situation was presented one sided, without any shades of gray, and the book was littlethan propaganda.I disagree with that assessment, but also wan I loved this book and have read probably six times Great love story and great historical fiction at the same time The first review on Goodreads really panned this book and all of Leon Uris books in general do NOT believe that review or his comments about other Uris books, in particular Exodus This person s comments were basically that the situation was presented one sided, without any shades of gray, and the book was littlethan propaganda.I disagree with that assessment, but also want to ask the question how can there be another side to either the Irish Catholic situation in Northern Ireland or certainly, the Jewish exodus to Israel after WWII Is it not an established fact that the English treated the native Irish population horribly, as they did with the native population in all of their colonies And it is also established fact, I believe, that they blockaded Palestine after the war to prevent Jewish immigration.So, I don t see what other side could be presented To try and show Britain in a positive light is revisionist history There is no other side and I m an anglophile big time His book about the Berlin airlift is another example the Soviet Union blockaded Berlin and left the civilian German population to starve Where is the other side to that Uris did present some characters on the other side as being conflicted about the choices their government was making I think the moral of his books would be that all individuals cannot control the actions of their governments, but they can control their own actions Maybe that is simplistic, but I would rather read a book that is passionate about its position sometimes you have to take a side there is not always shades of gray

  3. John says:

    A great book from Leon Uris Trinity is a bit long, and perhaps a bit one sided in telling the tale of the struggles in Northern Ireland It is a tale well told The characters are rich and memorable Memorable enough for me for a name to stick in naming our son many years later.Though the writing might seem a bit dated in 2020 it is well worth a read, both for the skill of the writer and a view of The Troubles that pervaded between the Irish and the English.A must read for historical fiction fa A great book from Leon Uris Trinity is a bit long, and perhaps a bit one sided in telling the tale of the struggles in Northern Ireland It is a tale well told The characters are rich and memorable Memorable enough for me for a name to stick in naming our son many years later.Though the writing might seem a bit dated in 2020 it is well worth a read, both for the skill of the writer and a view of The Troubles that pervaded between the Irish and the English.A must read for historical fiction fans

  4. David says:

    In all of Leon Uris s books, the schema is very simple There are good guys, and there are bad guys, and nowhere is there room for even a shade of ambiguity This kind of cartoonish view of the world leads to books which might be better classified as propaganda than as historical fiction.This was certainly the case for Exodus , which amounted to thinly disguised propaganda Armageddon , dealing with the Berlin airlift, also tended toward crude good guy bad guy categorizations, but didn t bot In all of Leon Uris s books, the schema is very simple There are good guys, and there are bad guys, and nowhere is there room for even a shade of ambiguity This kind of cartoonish view of the world leads to books which might be better classified as propaganda than as historical fiction.This was certainly the case for Exodus , which amounted to thinly disguised propaganda Armageddon , dealing with the Berlin airlift, also tended toward crude good guy bad guy categorizations, but didn t bother me quite as much However, I found Uris s heavyhanded, reductionist approach to writing about the situation in my own country supremely offensive from start to finish In addition to grossly oversimplifying political events and allegiances throughout, Uris is sure to include every lazy, faith and begorrah, bogtrotting cliche about the noble, bibulous, freedom fighting sons of Erin and the pretty colleens that love them The best that can be said about Uris is that he probably believed his own reductionist, 3rd grade view of history and world politics But be warned it s not just his thinking is at the 3rd grade level much of the writing is as well Uris s dictionary is stuffed with cliches, heavy on adjectives, but the word nuance is obviously missing But why would we expect anything else Uris was a hack The man was in the business of churning out bestsellers Apparently most readers like their historical fiction in black and white the reviews of Trinity on .com are evencreepily adulatory than thenorm Though I really would like to send the Bookmobile round to the caves of all those readers who claimed this was their favorite book ever Well, I disagree with all of thoseacolytes I thought this was a dreadful book, an insult to the intelligence, and I would recommend it to nobody Your mileage may vary

  5. Shelli says:

    This book was a very hard read at times filled with so little hope, but I learned so much I knew very little about the Protestant Catholic struggle in Ireland in the late 1800 s and early 1900 s Another tragic time in history where ignorance caused hatred fueled by religious fervor One of my favorite quotes came from my favorite character in the book, Conor Larkin He is an Irish Catholic rebel who spends his life fighting for his implausible cause..They sat across from one another and This book was a very hard read at times filled with so little hope, but I learned so much I knew very little about the Protestant Catholic struggle in Ireland in the late 1800 s and early 1900 s Another tragic time in history where ignorance caused hatred fueled by religious fervor One of my favorite quotes came from my favorite character in the book, Conor Larkin He is an Irish Catholic rebel who spends his life fighting for his implausible cause..They sat across from one another and Atty waited until he opened his own door and let it all pour out If there s a God, he whispered at last, and I surely think there is, He will have looked down on the Catholics and Protestants of this province and shaken His head sadly in realization it is the one place the Devil has beaten Him thoroughly There were parts of the story that were exciting and page turning, and others that readlike a history lesson The story was written in a way that left the reader feeling like there was definitely a good side and a bad side, with so little crossover as to be a bit unrealistic Thankfully there were some very beautiful love stories, albeit sad, to offset some of the horrible ordeals I wish I wasn t left with such a feeling of despair I m really glad I finally read this book even though it was extremely sobering

  6. Caitlin says:

    Let s begin by stipulating that Uris is a pulp fiction writer and should be read and reviewed on those terms There s absolutely nothing wrong with pulp fiction it s a great and wonderful genre full of entertainment value With Uris books the formula is pretty simple Our hero is noble, well read, and self sacrificing He s closed himself off, but is waiting for the right woman The right woman is also noble and self sacrificing, but strong willed and beautiful He sets these folks down in th Let s begin by stipulating that Uris is a pulp fiction writer and should be read and reviewed on those terms There s absolutely nothing wrong with pulp fiction it s a great and wonderful genre full of entertainment value With Uris books the formula is pretty simple Our hero is noble, well read, and self sacrificing He s closed himself off, but is waiting for the right woman The right woman is also noble and self sacrificing, but strong willed and beautiful He sets these folks down in the middle of some big historical conflict and then uses them to give readers a bit of a history lesson He s typically got a bias, but most history does These are good solid historical epics.I really like Mila 18, his book about the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising It inspired me to read a lot of actual history of the event including a number of diaries that were recovered from there Likewise with Trinity, which I read once before, I will most likely go readIrish history Trinity is a decent vehicle for imparting quite a bit of history from the Irish perspective It s a good read for making you think about the impact of imperialism and industrialization There s an excellent set of chapters on early twentieth century factories and a factory fire that will remind you why unions came about in a really visceral way.This is a dense read, but it s entertaining and interesting in parts and is probably a good gateway to othersubstantive reads on the subject matter.

  7. Susan says:

    When I first read this book over twenty years ago, I knew very little of the history of the Home Rule conflict between Ireland and England, and found it to be a moving and often shocking history lesson.Reading it this time, I found that even though I remembered many of the main events, the book had lost none of its impact, and I quickly became immersed once again in this powerful story.It s difficult not to become emotionally affected by the characters in this novel, especially when you realise When I first read this book over twenty years ago, I knew very little of the history of the Home Rule conflict between Ireland and England, and found it to be a moving and often shocking history lesson.Reading it this time, I found that even though I remembered many of the main events, the book had lost none of its impact, and I quickly became immersed once again in this powerful story.It s difficult not to become emotionally affected by the characters in this novel, especially when you realise that so many real people experienced the same things in their own lives.There are many memorable characters, but Connor was, for me, totally unforgettable.His destiny was shaped from early childhood, not only by what he himself observed, but also by a Father and Grandfather who believed passionatly in home rule, and told him the old stories of the struggles, and of the men who became folk heroes fighting for a better life for those who were oppressed by the colonisers.Connor and his fellows believed that their people had the right to decide on their own destiny, and felt that anything else was a compromise..a selling out to the enemy which was totally unacceptable.Like so many others in the history of the world, they felt compelled to give up any possibility of a pleasant and settled life for themselves, and continued to fight for justice, no matter what the cost.They saw oppression, misery and injustice, and couldn t pass by on the other side.but they paid a terrible price.This is a book which is rich in the history, traditions and culture of Ireland.at times it s almost unbearably sad and difficult to read, but it s well worth the effort

  8. Owen says:

    Having come to Trinity after a break of some twenty years since reading the Uris classics Exodus, Mila 18 and Armageddon, it was a very pleasant surprise to be able to discover that old zest for life, that lusty undercurrent which marks his work and fills it with an unmistakable energy At the same time, Trinity enabled me to discover something about my own Irish background, and put the perspective of history into a new position for me altogether In fact, so tainted were we, some of u Having come to Trinity after a break of some twenty years since reading the Uris classics Exodus, Mila 18 and Armageddon, it was a very pleasant surprise to be able to discover that old zest for life, that lusty undercurrent which marks his work and fills it with an unmistakable energy At the same time, Trinity enabled me to discover something about my own Irish background, and put the perspective of history into a new position for me altogether In fact, so tainted were we, some of us, by the version of the other protagonists in that ghastly story, that we had a curious emotion, verging on shame, when it came to being part Irish and perhapsimportantly, not sufficiently English I imagine that a great many people know what I mean It is through books like Trinity, Keneally s The Great Shame and McCourt s Angela s Ashes, that we are starting, many of us who were not born in Ireland but who have solid links of former ownership however tenuous they might have appeared , to finally get the gist I know one person who really had almost a prejudice against their own Irish family of last century, who came away from Trinity with a very different perspective indeed.It s really an awful story, and if you wonder any longer why the troubles have continued so long and so bitterly into the last century and, quite possibly, into this one, you must be reading it upside down At the same time, it s a great Uris yarn, if one may be permitted to say so And it doesn t make me ashamed at all, after reading this, to be doing some proper wearing of the green

  9. Cheryl says:

    I don t know how I forgot to record this bookI just found it in my garage, one of the few that escaped garage sales or Goodwill I keep it around hoping to one day re read it I recall running late for work, or returning from lunch, during the time that I read this book because I simply had to wrench myself away from the story often making a bathroom stop to dry my eyes and reapply mascara My dull review could never do it justice It s a story about a family in Ireland, following their liv I don t know how I forgot to record this bookI just found it in my garage, one of the few that escaped garage sales or Goodwill I keep it around hoping to one day re read it I recall running late for work, or returning from lunch, during the time that I read this book because I simply had to wrench myself away from the story often making a bathroom stop to dry my eyes and reapply mascara My dull review could never do it justice It s a story about a family in Ireland, following their lives through 3 generations The day to day lives of the family is intertwined with the decades of cultural, political turmoil, famine and incredible violence and hatred between the Protestants and Catholics that evolved through British occupation and colonialism I ve always been drawn to everything Irish, but the way the story unfolds, by focusing on one family, through generations, sucks the reader in on such a personal level that you feel as if you ve lived the modern history of Ireland all the joys and sorrows of being there When I finally finished I promised myself I would seek outof Leon Uris, who authored other historical fiction books

  10. Mary Slowik says:

    I m going to try and keep this real simple.What I liked the well executed compression of Irish history into a thirty year period from 1885 to 1915, with echoes of the prior thousand years The whole theme of no present, no future, only the past happening over and over again The ultimately fatalistic message, that the best Irish Republicans could hope for was a glorious defeat The quality of Uris writing which I ve come to expect, in that he can seamlessly weave together scene and summary I m going to try and keep this real simple.What I liked the well executed compression of Irish history into a thirty year period from 1885 to 1915, with echoes of the prior thousand years The whole theme of no present, no future, only the past happening over and over again The ultimately fatalistic message, that the best Irish Republicans could hope for was a glorious defeat The quality of Uris writing which I ve come to expect, in that he can seamlessly weave together scene and summary The unabashed tenderness in the romantic scenes, the appeal of the vulnerable masculine hero Conor Larkin Lastly the invention of the word oilylike, used in place of the awkward oilily What I didn t like so much the occasionally exclamatory prose I m not sure that this ever works well when an author throws down exclamation points outside of dialogue The unorthodox usage of certain verbs that never really caught on most notably spiraled to describe, for instance, climbing the social ladder The reversion to first person perspective when the action focuses on Seamus O Neill, the writer This was an interesting choice but I don t think it worked In fact it seems to accomplish littlethan drawing attention to the author s artifice The overlong section of Seamus newspaper articles.In conclusion stirring, sweeping, mostly effective historical fiction with a realistic i.e., pessimistic viewpoint on the whole Irish debacle Pretty unsparing in its critiques of all involved the Catholic church, Protestant propaganda, and, above all, imperial English meddling An unholy trinity

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