The Nothing That Is

The Nothing That Is ❮Download❯ ✤ The Nothing That Is ➻ Author Robert M. Kaplan – Heartforum.co.uk A Symbol For What Is Not There, An Emptiness That Increases Any Number It S Added To, An Inexhaustible And Indispensable Paradox As We Enter The Year , Zero Is Once Again Making Its Presence Felt Noth A Symbol For That Is PDF Å What Is Not There, An Emptiness That Increases Any Number It S Added To, An Inexhaustible And Indispensable Paradox As We Enter The Year , Zero Is Once Again Making Its Presence Felt Nothing Itself, It Makes Possible The Nothing Epub / A Myriad Of Calculations Indeed, Without Zero Mathematics As We Know It Would Not Exist And Without Mathematics Our Understanding Of The Universe Would Be Vastly Impoverished But Where Did This Nothing, This Hollow Circle, Come From Who Created It And What, Nothing That Is eBook ✓ Exactly, Does It Mean Robert Kaplan S The Nothing That Is A Natural History Of Zero Begins As A Mystery Story, Taking Us Back To Sumerian Times, And Then To Greece And India, Piecing Together The Way The Idea Of A Symbol For Nothing Evolved Kaplan Shows Us Just How Handicapped Our Ancestors Were In Trying To Figure Large Sums Without The Aid Of The Zero Try Multiplying CLXIV By XXIV Remarkably, Even The Greeks, Mathematically Brilliant As They Were, Didn T Have A Zero Or Did They We Follow The Trail To The East Where, A Millennium Or Two Ago, Indian Mathematicians Took Another Crucial Step By Treating Zero For The First Time Like Any Other Number, Instead Of A Unique Symbol, They Allowed Huge New Leaps Forward In Computation, And Also In Our Understanding Of How Mathematics Itself Works In The Middle Ages, This Mathematical Knowledge Swept Across Western Europe Via Arab Traders At First It Was Called Dangerous Saracen Magic And Considered The Devil S Work, But It Wasn T Long Before Merchants And Bankers Saw How Handy This Magic Was, And Used It To Develop Tools Like Double Entry Bookkeeping Zero Quickly Became An Essential Part Of Increasingly Sophisticated Equations, And With The Invention Of Calculus, One Could Say It Was A Linchpin Of The Scientific Revolution And Now Even Deeper Layers Of This Thing That Is Nothing Are Coming To Light Our Computers Speak Only In Zeros And Ones, And Modern Mathematics Shows That Zero Alone Can Be Made To Generate EverythingRobert Kaplan Serves Up All This History With Immense Zest And Humor His Writing Is Full Of Anecdotes And Asides, And Quotations From Shakespeare To Wallace Stevens Extend The Book S Context Far Beyond The Scope Of Scientific Specialists For Kaplan, The History Of Zero Is A Lens For Looking Not Only Into The Evolution Of Mathematics But Into Very Nature Of Human Thought He Points Out How The History Of Mathematics Is A Process Of Recursive Abstraction How Once A Symbol Is Created To Represent An Idea, That Symbol Itself Gives Rise To New Operations That In Turn Lead To New Ideas The Beauty Of Mathematics Is That Even Though We Invent It, We Seem To Be Discovering Something That Already ExistsThe Joy Of That Discovery Shines From Kaplan S Pages, As He Ranges From Archimedes To Einstein, Making Fascinating Connections Between Mathematical Insights From Every Age And Culture A Tour De Force Of Science History, The Nothing That Is Takes Us Through The Hollow Circle That Leads To Infinity.

Is a well That Is PDF Å known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Nothing That Is book, this is one of the most wanted Robert M Kaplan author readers around the world.

The Nothing That Is  PDF ß Nothing That Is  eBook
    Import EPUB to the Program Import EPUB This Nothing, This Hollow Circle, Come From Who Created It And What, Nothing That Is eBook ✓ Exactly, Does It Mean Robert Kaplan S The Nothing That Is A Natural History Of Zero Begins As A Mystery Story, Taking Us Back To Sumerian Times, And Then To Greece And India, Piecing Together The Way The Idea Of A Symbol For Nothing Evolved Kaplan Shows Us Just How Handicapped Our Ancestors Were In Trying To Figure Large Sums Without The Aid Of The Zero Try Multiplying CLXIV By XXIV Remarkably, Even The Greeks, Mathematically Brilliant As They Were, Didn T Have A Zero Or Did They We Follow The Trail To The East Where, A Millennium Or Two Ago, Indian Mathematicians Took Another Crucial Step By Treating Zero For The First Time Like Any Other Number, Instead Of A Unique Symbol, They Allowed Huge New Leaps Forward In Computation, And Also In Our Understanding Of How Mathematics Itself Works In The Middle Ages, This Mathematical Knowledge Swept Across Western Europe Via Arab Traders At First It Was Called Dangerous Saracen Magic And Considered The Devil S Work, But It Wasn T Long Before Merchants And Bankers Saw How Handy This Magic Was, And Used It To Develop Tools Like Double Entry Bookkeeping Zero Quickly Became An Essential Part Of Increasingly Sophisticated Equations, And With The Invention Of Calculus, One Could Say It Was A Linchpin Of The Scientific Revolution And Now Even Deeper Layers Of This Thing That Is Nothing Are Coming To Light Our Computers Speak Only In Zeros And Ones, And Modern Mathematics Shows That Zero Alone Can Be Made To Generate EverythingRobert Kaplan Serves Up All This History With Immense Zest And Humor His Writing Is Full Of Anecdotes And Asides, And Quotations From Shakespeare To Wallace Stevens Extend The Book S Context Far Beyond The Scope Of Scientific Specialists For Kaplan, The History Of Zero Is A Lens For Looking Not Only Into The Evolution Of Mathematics But Into Very Nature Of Human Thought He Points Out How The History Of Mathematics Is A Process Of Recursive Abstraction How Once A Symbol Is Created To Represent An Idea, That Symbol Itself Gives Rise To New Operations That In Turn Lead To New Ideas The Beauty Of Mathematics Is That Even Though We Invent It, We Seem To Be Discovering Something That Already ExistsThe Joy Of That Discovery Shines From Kaplan S Pages, As He Ranges From Archimedes To Einstein, Making Fascinating Connections Between Mathematical Insights From Every Age And Culture A Tour De Force Of Science History, The Nothing That Is Takes Us Through The Hollow Circle That Leads To Infinity."/>
  • Paperback
  • 240 pages
  • The Nothing That Is
  • Robert M. Kaplan
  • English
  • 09 August 2017
  • 0195142373

10 thoughts on “The Nothing That Is

  1. Megan Baxter says:

    Kaplan never met a literary allusion he didn t like At times this works, as it adds depth and surprising insight into some of the mathematical concepts he s talking about At other times, it feels remarkably scattershot, and adds little to the material Note The rest of this review has been ...

  2. Domhnall says:

    There are different ways to use and think about mathematical concepts and they do not all leave a historical record in a form that can be interpreted with certainty The gap between people engaged in trade and those indulging in philosophy has been especially important, notably for the ancient Greeks, whose philosophers used geometry to think mathematically and despised the mere counting required for trade Others have used sand or beads or counting boards or diverse tools in which the technique There are different ways to use and think about mathematical concepts and they do not all leave a historical record in a form that can be interpreted with certainty The gap between people engaged in trade and those indulging in philosophy has been especially important, notably for the ancient Greeks, whose philosophers used geometry to think mathematically and despised the mere counting required for trade Others have used sand or beads or counting boards or diverse tools in which the technique for even complex calculations did not necessarily entail a corresponding grasp of the theory ...

  3. Dave says:

    The Nothing That Is A Natural History of Zero by Robert Kaplan is a look at what is perhaps the most significant creations and advances ever made in mathematics Imagine trying to calculate using Roman Numerals or any system that did not have columns, and its significance doesn t end there as it is critical in dealing with negative numbers and calculus Zero took a journey from indicating nothing, to being a number of value which then forced the creation of the idea of null to once again indi The Nothing That Is A Natural History of Zero by Robert Kaplan is a look at what is perhaps the most significant creations and advances ever made in mathematics Imagine trying to calculate using Roman Numerals or any system that did not have columns, and its significance doesn t end there as it is cri...

  4. Jenny says:

    I much prefer the style of Zero The Biography of a Dangerous Idea However, this book is thought provoking and insightful The style is a little headier than I expected or wanted I thought it would beof a history, which it sort of was but in a very abstract way That s the key word for this book abstract That s okay it s just not what I was hoping for, which isn t Kaplan s fault, of course It s a good book It s well written It s well researched I wish Kaplan s explanations were cl I much prefer the style of Zero The Biography of a Dangerous Idea However, this book is thought provoking and insightful The style is a little headier than I expected or wanted I thought it would beof a history, which it sort of was but in a very abstract way That s the key word for this book abstract That s okay it s just not what I was hoping for, which isn t Kaplan s fault, of course It s a good book It s well written It s well researched I wish Kaplan s explanations were clearer, though, and the timeless complaint about m...

  5. Batgrl (Book Data Kept Elsewhere) says:

    This is a book that, a few years ago, made the perfect gift for my father, who has told me that he s read it several times And so it s the perfect book to try and polish off while I m visiting Because he ll miss it if I try to sneak off with it My father does this too when visiting me We both havebooks than we can keep track of However it was also a book which I didn t give myself enough time to read While the book is not entirely made up of them, every now and then there would be This is a book that, a few years ago, made the perfect gift for my father, who has told me that he s read it several times And so it s the perfect book to try and polish off while I m visiting Because he ll miss it if I try to sneak off with it My father does this too when visiting me We both havebooks than we can keep track of However it was also a book which I didn t give myself enough time to read While the book is not entirely made up of th...

  6. Brendan says:

    This book is insightful, it s goes leaps and bound beyond just 0, it s a history, a very very very quick pre calc primer, a thought exercise, it s philosophical treatise, it s a world view, and muchIt was as my favorite definition of education states, education is the systematic linking of thoughts, idea s, and knowledge You learn a lot in life, you go to school or read and educational book to have those idea s connected.But it s also racist, it s futurist not the e...

  7. Patrick Hewlett says:

    It s interesting when you realize how difficult it must ve been for ancient cultures to assign a name and an idea to a concept that doesn t physically exist 1, 5, or 60 apples are tangible and often part of everyday life , but what s t...

  8. Robert Run says:

    Kaplan is a mathematician who knows how to communicate to right brainers. YAY This is a really nice book that describes all the ways that the zero, and therefore math, is integrated into the rest of life and shows it throughout history in a wide range of discip...

  9. Shayna says:

    Just like The Art of the Infinite, this is one of my nerdy books It is really cool to view the authors way of explaining how zero is nothing, but most certainly exists and has a purpose.

  10. Alan Grieveson says:

    I was disappointed with this book in many ways Being a reader of mainly non fiction I expected a book, having heard a radio interview some years ago, that was informative.I found the authors style rambling and tedious, connecting anything with even the vaguest connect to nothing or zero into a somewhat difficult narrative As someone who has actually read A Brief History of Time in less time than it took to read this book, I cannot say I learned much.Sidelines into Mayan calendars and astrono I was disappointed with this book in many ways Being a reader of mainly non fiction I expected a book, having heard a radio interview some years ago, that was informative.I found the authors style rambling and tedious, connecting anything with even the vaguest connect to nothing or zero into a somewhat difficult narrative As someone who has actually read A Brief History of Time in less time than it took to read this book, I cannot say I learned much.Sidelines into Mayan calendars and astronomy only distracted from the supposed subject area.The first sixty odd pages were about the origination of the zero symbol, after which the author says this is of course only supposition or words to the effect It would have been better to start with the comment that nothing is known for certain about the history of the symbol but it is thought etc etc.Having five to six line sentences didn t he...

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