How to Treat People: A Nurse at Work




      How to Treat People: A Nurse at Work
Molly Case reminds us that humanity and moments of true care are as healing as the medicine modern science can deliver Julia Samuel, author of Grief Works Beautifully written and passionate tales from the nurse you would choose for yourself Stephen Westsaby, author of Fragile Lives_______________________________The hand of a stranger offered in solace A flower placed on a dead body as a mark of respect A gentle word in response to fear and anger It is these moments of empathy, in the extremis of human experience, which define us as people.Nobody knows this better than a nurse and Molly Case has witnessed countless such moments In How to Treat People, she documents these extraordinary points, when two people truly connect In rich, lyrical prose, she introduces us to patients with whom we share the pain, but also the experience of illness when life is at its most vivid And when her father is admitted to the high dependency unit on which she works, Molly confronts care in a whole new way, when two worlds the professional and the personal suddenly collide.Weaving together medical history, art, memoir and science, How to Treat People beautifully illustrates the intricacies of the human condition and the oscillating rhythms of life and death Most of all, it is a heart stopping reminder that we can all find meaning in being part, even for a moment, of the lives of others.__________________________________ A profound reflection on the way we live and die Bookseller How to Treat People gets to the heart of who we are Nina Stibbe Intense, powerful, moving and very enlightening Gerard Woodward Fascinating and erudite Jo Brand Free Read How to Treat People: A Nurse at Work [ By ] Molly Case [ Kindle ePUB or eBook ] – heartforum.co.uk

Molly Case was born and raised in London, where she works as a cardiac nurse specialist at St George s Hospital Also a poet and spoken word artist, her works have appeared in the Guardian, the Independent, the Times, Elle, and the Huffington Post.

New Read 
      How to Treat People: A Nurse at Work
 author Molly Case For Kindle ePUB or eBook – heartforum.co.uk
  • Hardcover
  • How to Treat People: A Nurse at Work
  • Molly Case
  • 19 October 2018
  • 0241347378

10 thoughts on “ How to Treat People: A Nurse at Work

  1. Alice-Elizabeth (marriedtobooks) says:

    A lovely medical memoir about Molly s journey into nursing First, she has an operation as a teenager and now working on the hospital wards, she shares her journey about studying Creative Writing English at Uni alongside working as a care worker in ...

  2. Janel says:

    a still patient whose chest is silent is farfrightening than any other sound Part memoir, part science the connection between nurse and patient, the empathy, the kindness, the moments shared is what it means to be a nurse this book was a pleasure to read.As well as sharing her professional experiences, Molly shares her personal ones too the other side, if you like when her father is admitted to the high dependency unit where she works.I loved the medical history interspersed through a still patient whose chest is silent is farfrightening than any other sound Part memoir, part science the connection betwee...

  3. Sarah says:

    3.5 rounded downA solid addition to the medical memoir sub genre, How to Treat People offers a slightly different perspective compared to the previous books I ve read in this genre that of a nurse What I took away from this was that nurses have a slightly different relationship with patients than that of surgeons and doctors GPs, and Case s book is written with true compassion for her patients in their time of need Her experiences at work are interwoven with her father s and her own medical 3.5 rounded downA solid addition to the medical memoir sub genre, How to Treat People offers a slightly different perspective compared to the previous books I ve read in this genre that of a nurse What I took away from this was that nurses have a slightly different relationship with patients than that of surgeons and doctors GPs, and Case...

  4. Rebecca says:

    I read the first 77 pages Her writing about her nursing training and the patients she encountered is pleasant enough, but I found the structure Airway Breathing Circulation Disability Exposure clich d and too similar to the Aoife Abbey book I DNFed earlier in the year If you re going to re...

  5. Bookread2day says:

    Read in hardback This is my first medical true book that I have Molly Case explains in detail finding her granny dead and five years later she saw her second dead body on her first ward, on her first morning within her first hour of nurse training I too see my first dead body when I was serving tea and coffee, at a hospital, when no nurse informed me that a lady had died, there I stood t...

  6. Molly says:

    Molly deftly describes and humanises nursing Personal and professional stories interweave, culminating in heart wrenching moments, and sometimes funny ones too There are moments of pure poetry and yet also a truthful, plain quality to the writing as she does not shy away from the realities of nursing Always respectful and deeply caring you can feel how much she connects with her job and the people she meets A definite recommendation for those interested in nursing, medicine or who have enjoy Molly deftly describes and humanises nursing Personal and professional stories interweave, culminating in heart wrenching moments, and sometimes funny ones too There are moments of pure poetry and yet also a truthful, plain quality to the writing as she does not shy away from the realities of nursing Always r...

  7. James Wann says:

    I read this book in just a couple of days It is wonderfully crafted split up into sections by ABCDE a nurse s examination checklist Case makes the esoteric familiar so that her complex medical experiences are accessible for the rest of us At times it s tragic, at times it s funny, but it s always gentle and respectful.Tender moments, like feeling her father s Old Holborn breath against her cheek, pre empt and contextualise the experiences and responsibilities of her job They introduce us I read this book in just a couple of days It is wonderfully crafted split up into sections by ABCDE a nurse s examination checklist Case makes the esoteric familiar so that her complex medical experiences are accessible for the rest of us At times it s tragic, at times it s funny, but it s always gentle and respectful.Tender moments, like feeling her father s Old Holborn ...

  8. Rob says:

    How to treat people is Case s love letter to the nursing profession, her father and her patients It s full of stories that evocatively describe our relationship with each other and how each action can positively affect a person s life The stories collated using the nursing assessment criteria ABCDE and throughout Case weaves patient experiences with her own, her father was admitted to the same unit she worked at and had to have ...

  9. Clair Sharpe says:

    This is a medical memoir, a genre I am thrilled is being populated by lots of moving and informative books The author, Molly Case studied English Literature and creative writing at Bath University and while there worked as a care worker in a residential facility for people with Alzheimer s She discovered her natural calling, deciding to train as a nurse.How to Treat People details her experiences as a nurse She details her own experiences of a rare gastrointestinal disorder as a teenager and This is a medical memoir, a genre I am thrilled is being populated by lots of moving and informative books The author, Molly Case studied English Literature and creative writing at Bath University and while there worked as a care worker in a residential facility for people with Alzheimer s She discovered her natural calling, deciding to train as a nurse.How to Treat People details her experiences as a nurse She details her own experiences of a rare gastrointestinal disorder as a teenager and how it felt for her when her dad became a patient on the cardiac unit on which she wo...

  10. Kim says:

    I thought the language of this book was overly flowery that put me off at times and it seemed self conscious The stories themselves were really interesting and moving But I also felt that some bits may have been a little embellished I would have liked a section at the end that explained how she anonymised the patients For example, some of the detail was identifiable, e.g the patient had this nationality, had this occupation, and had this condition, at this hospital Surely the only reason I thought the language of this book was overly flowery that put me off at times and it seemed self conscious The stories themselves were really interesting and moving But I also felt that some bits may have been a little embellished I would have liked a section at the end that explained how she anonymised the patients For example, some of the detail was identifiable, e.g the patient had this nationality, had this occupation, and had this conditi...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *