How to Treat People



How to Treat People As a teenager, Molly Case underwent an operation that saved her life Nearly a decade later, she finds herself in the operating room again this time as a trainee nurse She learns to care for her patients, sharing not only their pain, but also life affirming moments of hope In doing so, she offers a compelling account of the processes that keep them alive, from respiratory examinations to surgical prep But when Molly s father is admitted to the cardiac unit where she works, the professional and the personal suddenly collide.In rich, lyrical prose, Case illustrates the intricacies of the human condition through the hand of a stranger, offered in solace, and in a person s last breaths Weaving together medical history, art, memoir, and science, How to Treat People explores the oscillating rhythms of life and death in a tender reminder that we can all find meaning in the lives of others. Read How to Treat People – heartforum.co.uk

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  • Hardcover
  • 280 pages
  • How to Treat People
  • Molly Case
  • English
  • 18 November 2019
  • 0241347378

14 thoughts on “How to Treat People

  1. Alice-Elizabeth (marriedtobooks) says:

    A lovely medical memoir about Molly s journey into nursing First, she has an operation as a teenager and now working on the hospital wards, she shares her journey about studying Creative Writing English at Uni alongside w...

  2. Janel says:

    a still patient whose chest is silent is farfrightening than any other sound Part memoir, part science the connection between nurse and patient, the empathy, the kindness, the moments shared is what it means to be a nurse this book was a pleasure to read.As well as sharing her professional experiences, Molly shares her personal ones too the other side, if you like when her father is admitted to the high dependency unit where she works.I loved the medical history interspersed through a still patient whose chest is silent is farfrightening than any other sound Part memoir, part science the connection between nurse and patient, the empathy, the kindness, the moments shared is what it means to be a nurse this book was a pleasure to read.As well as sharing her professional experiences, Molly shares her personal ones too the other side, if you like when her fath...

  3. Sarah says:

    3.5 rounded downA solid addition to the medical memoir sub genre, How to Treat People offers a slightly different perspective compared to the previous books I ve read in this genre that of a nurse What I took away from this was that nurses have a slightly different relationship with patients than that of surgeons and doctors GPs, and Case s book is written with true compassion for her patients in their time of need Her experiences at work are interwoven with her father s and her own medical 3.5 rounded downA solid addition to the medical memoir sub genre, How to Treat People offers a slightly different perspective compared to the previous books I ve read in this genre that of a nurse What I took away from this was that nurses have a slightly different relationship with patients than that of surgeons and doctors GPs...

  4. Rebecca says:

    I read the first 77 pages Her writing about her nursing training and the patients she encountered is pleasant enough, but I found the structure Airway Breathing Circulation Disability Exposure clich d and too similar to the Aoife Abbey book I DNFed earlier in the year If you re going to read a book about nursing it might as well be Christie Watson s The Language of Kindness I read the first 77 pages Her writing about her nursing training and the...

  5. Bookread2day says:

    Read in hardback This is my first medical true book that I have Molly Case explains in detail finding her granny dead and five years later she saw her second dead body on her first ward, on her first morning within her first hour of nurse training I too see my first dead body when I was serving tea and coffee, at a hospital, when no nurse informed me that a lady had died, there I stood talking to a dead lady asking her if she would like tea or coffee I do think that a nurse could have inform Read in hardback This is my first medical true book that I have Molly Case explains in detail finding her granny dead and five years later she saw her second dead body on her first ward, on her first morning within her first hour of nurse training I too see my first dead body when I was serving tea and coffee, at a hospital, when no nurse informed me that a lady had died, there I stood talking to a dead lady asking her if she would like tea or coffee I do t...

  6. Laura says:

    A short and sweet nursing memoir that is peppered with stories from the frontline and a little history and philosophy of nursing throughout the ages I enjoyed this book, although the author is still fairly newly qualified, she writes with a poetic tone and this is what makes it so readable The author manages to share some of her own personal stories with the NHS and from her time as a nursing student.All of the chapters ended bluntly which I found a bit odd I was expectingfrom each part A short and sweet nursing memoir that is peppered with stories from the frontline and a little history and philosophy of nursing throughout the ages I enjoyed this book, although the author is still fairly newly qualified, she writes with a poetic tone and this is what makes it so readable The author manages to share some of her own personal stories with the NHS and from her time a...

  7. Book Ichor says:

    Molly deftly describes and humanises nursing Personal and professional stories interweave, culminating in heart wrenching moments, and sometimes funny ones too There are moments of pure poetry and yet also a truthful, plain quality to the writing as she does not shy away from the realities of nursing Always respectful and deeply caring you can feel how much she connects with her job and the people she meets A definite recommendation for those interested in nursing, medicine or who have enjoy Molly deftly describes and humanises nursing Personal and professional stories interweave, culminating in heart wrenching moments, and sometimes funny ones too There are moments of pure poetry and yet also a truthful, plain quality to the writing as she does not shy away from the realities of nursing Always respectful and deeply cari...

  8. Macaira Leahy says:

    A well written, short but informative glimpse into the life of a nurse An especially powerful read right now in the midst of the SARS CoV2 outbreak She included the following quote at the end of the book When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother wou...

  9. Clair Sharpe says:

    This is a medical memoir, a genre I am thrilled is being populated by lots of moving and informative books The author, Molly Case studied English Literature and creative writing at Bath University and while there worked as a care worker in a residential facility for people with Alzheimer s She discovered her natural calling, deciding to train as a nurse.How to Treat People details her experiences as a nurse She details her own experiences of a rare gastrointestinal disorder as a teenager and This is a medical memoir, a genre I am thrilled is being populated by lots of moving and informative books The author, Molly Case studied English Literature and creative writing at Bath University and while there worked as a care worker in a residential facility for people with Alzheimer s She discovered her natural calling, deciding to train as a nurse.How to Treat People details her experiences as a nurse She details her own experiences of a rare gastrointestinal disorder as a teenager and how it felt for her when her dad became a patient on the cardiac unit on which she worked There ...

  10. James Wann says:

    I read this book in just a couple of days It is wonderfully crafted split up into sections by ABCDE a nurse s examination checklist Case makes the esoteric familiar so that her complex medical experiences are accessible for the rest of us At times it s tragic, at times it s funny, but it s always gentle and respectful.Tender moments, like feeling her father s Old Holborn breath against her cheek, pre empt and contextualise the experiences and responsibilities of her job They introduce us I read this book in just a couple of days It is wonderfully crafted split up into sections by ABCDE a nurse s examination checklist Case makes the esoteric familiar so that her complex medical experiences are accessible for the rest of us At times it s tragic, at times it s funny, but it s always gentle and re...

  11. Kim says:

    I thought the language of this book was overly flowery that put me off at times and it seemed self conscious The stories themselves were really interesting and moving But I also felt that some bits may have been a little embellished I would have liked a section at the end that explained how she anonymised the patients For example, some of the detail was identifiable, e.g the patient had this nationality, had this occupation, and had this condition, at this hospital Surely the only reason I thought the language of this book was overly flowery that put me off at times and it seemed self conscious The stories themselves were really interesting and moving But I also felt that some bits may have been a little embellished I would have liked a section at the end that explained how she anonymised the patients For example, some of the detail was identifiable, e.g the patient had this nationality, had this occupation, and ha...

  12. Rob says:

    How to treat people is Case s love letter to the nursing profession, her father and her patients It s full of stories that evocatively describe our relationship with each other and how each action can positively affect a person s life The stories collated using the nursing assessment criteria ABCDE and throughout Case weaves patient experiences with her own, her father was admitted to the same unit she worked at and had to have cardiac surgery How to treat people is a wonderfully rich read, i How to treat people is Case s love letter to the nursing profession, her father and her patients It s full of stories that evocatively describe our relationship with each other and how each action can positively affect a person s life The stories collated using the nursing assessment criteria ABCDE and throughout Case weaves...

  13. Violeta says:

    I generally like medical writing, but something about this memoir wasn t right for me Maybe I expected it due to the title to beabout the connection nursing allows with patients, or about empathyand while it did have aspects of thosemetaphorical themes, it focused muchon literal ...

  14. Lucia says:

    Read and reviewed in exchange for a free copy from NetGalley I generally enjoy medical memoirs, and this one was no exception Case gives an insightful look into nursing whilst also sharing her own family history and incorporating aspects of medical history and etymology, which I found really inte...

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