Still Water: The Deep Life of the Pond



Still Water: The Deep Life of the PondThe Times AndIrish Independent BEST NATURE BOOKS OF THE YEARGreat Nature Writing Needs To Be Informative, Detailed, Accurate, Lyrical, And, Above All, To Instil A Sense Of Gratitude And Wonder John Lewis Stempel Succeeds In All These Things Triumphantly From Amorous Toads To The Eye Popping Mating Habits Of Water Boatmen, A Magical Celebration Of Pond Life By One Of Our Finest, Most Evocative Nature Writers Daily MailPonds Small Bodies Of Water, Both Naturally Formed And Artificial, Home To Wondrous, Multitudinous Life Forms Ponds Define Our Childhood Frogspawn, Goldfish, Feeding The Ducks, But Also Our Village Life, Our Farms, Our Landscape And They Are Multi Layered From Carp Circling The Bottom To Water Boatmen, Coot, And Birds Dragonflies Overhead In Still Water, John Immerses Himself In The Murky Depths, Both Literarily And Figuratively, To Explore The Still Waters Of The British Countryside Through Each Month Of The Year.

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Still Water: The Deep Life of the Pond book, this is one of the most wanted John Lewis-Stempel author readers around the world.

Read ✓ Still Water: The Deep Life of the Pond By John Lewis-Stempel – Heartforum.co.uk
  • ebook
  • 304 pages
  • Still Water: The Deep Life of the Pond
  • John Lewis-Stempel
  • English
  • 02 July 2017
  • 1473542529

10 thoughts on “Still Water: The Deep Life of the Pond

  1. Rebecca says:

    Ponds What s not to like Lewis Stempel publishes way too much I d prefer a well honed, concise yet brimming nature memoir from him every few years rather than a loose, free association one on a narrow theme once or twice a year But there s no denying he s made a tidy little industry of writing about his Shropshire farm and its surroundings Here he compares his local pond with one in Argenton, western France, where he s gone to look into organic agriculture He describes the pond and its c Ponds What s not to like Lewis Stempel publishes way too much I d prefer a well honed, concise yet brimming nature memoir from him every few years rather than a loose, free association one on a narrow theme once or twice a year But there s no denying he s made a tidy little industry of writing about his Shropshire farm and its surroundings Here he compares his local pond with one in Argenton, western France, where he s gone to look into organic agriculture He describes the pond and its creatures in all seasons through a one year diary format A helpful appendix tells you how to create your own garden pond My favorite incident was rescuing a cow from the pond by creating a ramp of bulrushes and then pulling her out with a tractor

  2. Paul says:

    Every village of any note used to have its church, pub and pond, but it has been a long while since I have seen a pond in a village, and even though some have become clogged with silt, there are still a substantial number left Even a small pond can support a surprising amount of life There are the obvious frogs and toads and the other amphibians, but on top of that, there are all the insects and invertebrates, leeches, and all manner of birdlife Mammals too rely on ponds for water and opportu Every village of any note used to have its church, pub and pond, but it has been a long while since I have seen a pond in a village, and even though some have become clogged with silt, there are still a substantial number left Even a small pond can support a surprising amount of life There are the obvious frogs and toads and the other amphibians, but on top of that, there are all the insects and invertebrates, leeches, and all manner of birdlife Mammals too rely on ponds for water and opportunities to eat some of the other wildlife there.A pond is Bigger than a puddle and smaller than a lake and John Lewis Stempel is fortunate to have a pond on his farm in Hereford, and he begins this book from a frogs eye view while swimming in there This book takes us from the layers of mud and silt at the bottom that protects all manner of creatures in the depths of winter, past the plants and the insects that feed there to the surface and the creatures that stop by for the life giving water He slips a small amount of that water onto a slide and sees the world that the first naturalists first saw through a microscope.This is another very readable book by Lewis Stempel He mixes in prose and poetry and I liked the seasonal diary format of the book and the way he compared the aquatic life in France with the pond on his farm in Hereford I did feel that this wasn t quite as good as his previous books, though that said, he has a very high bar to reach each time Still worth reading though for his beautiful prose and sharp observations

  3. Femke says:

    Lewis Stempels books are really relaxing to read, though I prefer his book The wood over this one.

  4. ⋟Kimari⋞ says:

    You might also enjoy Braiding Sweetgrass The Wood The Life Times of Cockshutt Wood The Wild Places Notes From Walnut Tree Farm Eager The Surprising, Secret Life of Beavers High Tide in Tucson Pilgrim at Tinker Creek

  5. Jan says:

    Another thoroughly enjoyable book by this author.Written almost in the form of journal notes but interspersed with poems, it was educational without being dry or preachy.Beautifully evocative in creating the sights, sounds and smells of ponds through the seasons.As with his other books that I have read, it really made me want to go out and start visiting ponds

  6. Louise says:

    1 StarDNFGiving up Partly this is my fault for not researching enough what type of book this is Partly the author s fault for writing pretentious overly lyrical streams of consciousness with no actual underlying content.This is not a book about ponds This is the edited day to day diary of a navel gazing farmer who has gone back through it and selected all the days that contain the word pond and sent them off to a publisher I forced myself quarter the way through it and have learned absolut 1 StarDNFGiving up Partly this is my fault for not researching enough what type of book this is Partly the author s fault for writing pretentious overly lyrical streams of consciousness with no actual underlying content.This is not a book about ponds This is the edited day to day diary of a navel gazing farmer who has gone back through it and selected all the days that contain the word pond and sent them off to a publisher I forced myself quarter the way through it and have learned absolutely nothing about ponds but been subjected to overwrought descriptions a plenty, reams of quoted poetry, and a cow being described grossly as buxom.I am fucking out.Taking any other books this guy has written off my wishlist Not entirely sure from this why on earth he s such a big name in nature writing

  7. Gareth Evans says:

    There is much to enjoy in this book I learned much duck decoys, the blood month, the backswimmer and muchI enjoyed the references to farm life I didn t enjoy thelyrical writing and always find poetry inserted in prose books rather dull, however good or apposite the poetry although the prose quotes were good Overall, there is much to enjoy.

  8. Thomas says:

    Another very enjoyable and interesting read following the life of two ponds over the course of a year I wish I had room in my garden for a pond I will never look at a pond the same again, absolutely bursting with life and stories.

  9. Kim Horrod says:

    Beautifully written and wonderfully informative, only 4 stars merely because I amnot quite so interested in ponds as I am in other areas of nature and nature writing.If you are fascinated by stickle backs and pond life this is a wonderful read.

  10. Ivan Monckton says:

    Beautifully written, as always with Lewis Stempel s books, but I struggled with, and was irritated by, the constant flitting from his Herefordshire farm pond to a mill pond in France What was the point

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