The Miracle Lady: Kathryn Kuhlman and the Transformation of Charismatic Christianity

The Miracle Lady: Kathryn Kuhlman and the Transformation of Charismatic Christianity[EPUB] ✺ The Miracle Lady: Kathryn Kuhlman and the Transformation of Charismatic Christianity Author Amy Collier Artman – Heartforum.co.uk A smart, powerful, charismatic preacher brought back to lifeOn October , , Johnny Carson welcomed his next guest on The Tonight Show with these words I imagine there are very few people who are not aw A Lady: Kathryn Kuhlman and MOBI :Ä smart, powerful, charismatic preacher brought back to Lady: Kathryn PDF ↠ lifeOn October Johnny Carson welcomed his next guest on The Tonight Show with these words I imagine there are very few people who are The Miracle eBook Í not aware of Kathryn Kuhlman She probably, along with Billy Graham, is one of the best known ministers or preachers in the country But while many people today recognize Billy Graham, not many Miracle Lady: Kathryn eBook ✓ remember Kathryn Kuhlman , who preached faith and miracles to countless people over the fifty five years of her ministry and became one of the most important figures in the rise of charismatic ChristianityIn The Miracle Lady Amy Collier Artman tells the story of Kuhlman s life and, in the process, relates the larger story of charismatic Christianity, particularly how it moved from the fringes of American society to the mainstream Tracing her remarkable career as a media savvy preacher and fleshing out her unconventional character, Artman also shows how Kuhlman skillfully navigated the oppressive structures, rules, and landmines that surrounded female religious leaders in her conservative circles.

Is Lady: Kathryn Kuhlman and MOBI :Ä a well known author, some of his Lady: Kathryn PDF ↠ books are a fascination for readers like in the The Miracle Lady: Kathryn Kuhlman and the Transformation of Charismatic Christianity book, this is one The Miracle eBook Í of the most wanted Amy Collier Artman author readers around the world.

The Miracle Lady: Kathryn Kuhlman and the Transformation
    Import EPUB to the Program Import EPUB became one of the most important figures in the rise of charismatic ChristianityIn The Miracle Lady Amy Collier Artman tells the story of Kuhlman s life and, in the process, relates the larger story of charismatic Christianity, particularly how it moved from the fringes of American society to the mainstream Tracing her remarkable career as a media savvy preacher and fleshing out her unconventional character, Artman also shows how Kuhlman skillfully navigated the oppressive structures, rules, and landmines that surrounded female religious leaders in her conservative circles."/>
  • Paperback
  • 248 pages
  • The Miracle Lady: Kathryn Kuhlman and the Transformation of Charismatic Christianity
  • Amy Collier Artman
  • 14 July 2018
  • 0802876706

10 thoughts on “The Miracle Lady: Kathryn Kuhlman and the Transformation of Charismatic Christianity

  1. Nancy says:

    I believe in miracles, because I believe in God I had never heard of Kathryn Kuhlman until I discovered this book I found this biography of her life and times to be pretty interesting, and while reading it I also sought out videos of her online and other information on her From what I have seen so far she was a fascinating figure, and considering how popular she was I am surprised I hadn t heard of her before Recommended.

  2. George P. says:

    Readers of a certain age remember Kathryn Kuhlman 1907 1976 She was the miracle lady, whose catchphrase, I believe in miracles because I believe in God, inspired millions to seek faith in Jesus Christ and the life changing power of the Holy Spirit The New International Dictionary of Pentecostal and Charismatic Movements even described her as the world s most widely known female evangelist Younger readers are likely unfamiliar with Kuhlman, however Her miracle services, radio ministry, Readers of a certain age remember Kathryn Kuhlman 1907 1976 She was the miracle lady, whose catchphrase, I believe in miracles because I believe in God, inspired millions to seek faith in Jesus Christ and the life changing power of the Holy Spirit The New International Dictionary of Pentecostal and Charismatic Movements even described her as the world s most widely known female evangelist Younger readers are likely unfamiliar with Kuhlman, however Her miracle services, radio ministry, and syndicated television show, though well attended and widely consumed in her day, lost influence after her death This decline was not unexpected The ministries of charismatic leaders rarely outlive them, especially when, as in Kuhlman s case, their estates are diverted away from ministry maintenance toward personal gain by unscrupulous heirs.And yet, Kathryn Kuhlman should be better known because she played a crucial role in what biographer Amy Collier Artman calls the gentrification of charismatic Christianity Until the middle of the 20th century, classical Pentecostalism was the primary bearer of Spirit filled Christianity Starting on the wrong side of the tracks, socially and ecclesiastically speaking, classical Pentecostalism had increasingly moved toward respectability by mid century, as symbolized by the Assemblies of God joining the National Association of Evangelicals as a founding member in the early 1940s Today, it is the NAE s largest denominational member It was charismatic Christianity that accelerated the popularity of Spirit filled beliefs and practices in the second half of the century, however Kuhlman was a leader in the transformation of charismatic Christianity from a suspect form of religion to a respectable form of religiosity that was accepted and even celebrated by mainstream Christianity and culture by the end of the twentieth century The Miracle Lady tells the story of how this happened, focusing especially on Kuhlman s skillful use of talk show television.Rather than broadcasting her spiritually charged miracle services themselves, Kuhlman invited people who had been saved, healed and filled with the Spirit to share their own testimonies, first on Your Faith and Mine in the 1950s, then on I Believe in Miracles in the mid 1960s to mid 1970s These television shows presented normal looking, intelligent people calmly telling others what God had done for them Out were the pyrotechnics of the Pentecostal revival service In were normal folk talking normally about the supernatural Artman says that Kuhlman and charismatic Christianity came of age together The same could be said of them and television Kuhlman was an early adopter of the talk show format, which was perfectly suited for introducing otherwise cautious viewers to charismatic Christianity.By the same token, Kuhlman in her day made it clear that she was not a faith healer, an appellation she shunned Unlike Word of Faith evangelists, she did not believe healing was dependent on the character of one s faith, or that faith would inoculate a person from suffering Additionally, she did not use her television show to make continuous appeals for money, despite the high costs of production In this respect, she needs to be distinguished from televangelists such as Benny Hinn, who despite implicitly claiming Kuhlman s mantle, never actually met or worked with her Artman also discusses how Kuhlman navigated the tensions of being a woman leader in a theologically and morally conservative movement Kuhlman adopted a rhetoric of negation, often stating that she wasn t God s first choice, but no man had been willing to step up and do the work, so she volunteered Take nothing and use it, she often said.Artman contrasts this rhetoric of negation with Adele Carmichael s rhetoric of affirmation She recounts a 1974 interview Kuhlman conducted with Carmichael on the set of I Believe in Miracles Carmichael, five years Kuhlman s senior, lived until 2003, dying on her way to teach Sunday school at 101 years of age She continues to hold the record as one of the Assemblies of God s longest serving ministers, having been first credentialed in 1918 In that episode, Kuhlman remarked to Carmichael, It was not the easiest thing in the world to be a woman preacher How did you master it Carmichael responded, I had a wonderful husband who was 100 percent for women preachers As I study the Word, I believe God needs women, has a place for their ministry In fact, she went on, Many times I ve prayed thanks that God gave you your ministry and not a man, Kuhlman demurred, saying I always thought I was second or third choice But Carmichael boldly declared I think you were his first choice Even today, unfortunately, Spirit filled women continue to navigate the difficult waters of leadership, sometimes justifying their ministries through negation rhetoric like Kuhlman s Carmichael s affirmation rhetoric offers a better way forward, it seems to me.The Miracle Lady is not a who did what when type of biography If you re looking for atraditional biography, I d recommend Wayne Warner s excellent Kathryn Kuhlman The Woman Behind the Miracles The strength of Artman s The Miracle Lady is that it uses Kuhlman s life as a lens through which to view a crucial period and a key mover in the transformation of charismatic Christianity A 2008 Barna study estimated that 80 million Americans self identified as either Pentecostal or charismatic This happened, at least in part, because of the efforts of Kathryn Kuhlman to mainstream Spirit filled Christianity and broaden its appeal For that, Kuhlman deserves to be remembered.Book ReviewedAmy Collier Artman, The Miracle Lady Kathryn Kuhlman and the Transformation of Charismatic Christianity Grand Rapids, MI Eerdmans, 2019.P.S If you liked my review, please click Helpful on myreview page.P.P.S This review is cross posted from InfluenceMagazine.com with permission

  3. Steve says:

    Kathryn Kuhlman 1907 1976 was a person of paradoxes She was a woman leader in patriarchal evangelicalism She was a TV evangelist that didn t tout for money She was a healer who didn t claim any healing ability she always placed the focus on God as the healer Her ministry marked a distinction between Pentecostalism and Charismaticism She lived the life of a liberated single divorced woman while opposing women s liberation.Kuhlman belonged to the facilitator type of healing ministry Kathryn Kuhlman 1907 1976 was a person of paradoxes She was a woman leader in patriarchal evangelicalism She was a TV evangelist that didn t tout for money She was a healer who didn t claim any healing ability she always placed the focus on God as the healer Her ministry marked a distinction between Pentecostalism and Charismaticism She lived the life of a liberated single divorced woman while opposing women s liberation.Kuhlman belonged to the facilitator type of healing ministry As Artman observes Facilitating healing emerged out of a renewal of interest in healing in themainstream evangelical Christianity of the time It represented a movement away from thevolatile and dramatic ministries of heroic healers of incipient Pentecostalism such as Maria Woodworth Etter and John Alexander Dowie Facilitating healing was characterised by Charles Price and A B Simpson Price s teacher was Aime Semple McPherson Yet, as Artman reveals Kuhlman sought to both distance herself from and yet affirm McPherson.Artman ably and expertly traces the contours of Kuhlman s life and career Artman has trawled through hours upon hours of the TV programmes that Kuhlman produced as well as photographic and documentary evidence to provide a perspective, as objective as possible, on Kuhlman and her times.The book isthan a biography of Kuhlman it shows how Pentecostalism moved from the fringes of evangelical Christianity to the centre It was renamed and rebranded as charismatic Christianity in an attempt to make itacceptable This process Artman terms gentrification It was a process with Kuhlman at the centre Kuhlman s TV programmes provided an easy way into this movement without having to go to a revival meeting It was a safe, accessible and private way in As Artman has it Kuhlman s life provides an orienting narrative, a road map for studying the gentrification of charismatic Christianity Kuhlman taught that healing was in the atonement of Christ it contained a ransom from both sin and sickness She held Arminian views that salvation was open to all who respond She also held to a strong premillennial eschatology As this is a historical study rather than a theological one these Artman identifies these points but doesn t discuss them further.This book provides a fascinating insight into Kulhman and the transition of Pentecostalism into the charismatic movement

  4. Marsha Dixon says:

    I wanted to read this book because my Mom loved to watch Kathryn Kuhlman on tv I really didn t know that much of Kathryn s life story until I read this book I was shocked and amazed at how much she changed the perception of women evangelists, healing and Christianity itself This book also talks about some of the mentors and others that were involved in her life and ministry There is a lot of information here and at times it was a little difficult to grind through If you re curious how thing I wanted to read this book because my Mom loved to watch Kathryn Kuhlman on tv I really didn t know that much of Kathryn s life story until I read this book I was shocked and amazed at how much she changed the perception of women evangelists, healing and Christianity itself This book also talks about some of the mentors and others that were involved in her life and ministry There is a lot of information here and at times it was a little difficult to grind through If you re curious how things have changed over the years with Pentecostalism, Charismatic Christians, healing, and women preachers and evangelists with Kathryn forging the way, this should be very interesting to you Very well done.I received a complimentary electronic copy of this book from NetGalley for an honest review

  5. Diane says:

    The Miracle Lady Kathryn Kuhlman and the Transformation of Charismatic Christianity by author Amy Collier Artman is an interesting look back into the changes in the perceptions of the Charismatic movement within Christian doctrines during the 50 s and into the 80 s in light of the Kathryn Kuhlman ministry The author gives a biographical history for Kathryn Kuhlman and her beginnings in the Pentecostal ministries which were mainly dominated by men during that era She paved the way forward to t The Miracle Lady Kathryn Kuhlman and the Transformation of Charismatic Christianity by author Amy Collier Artman is an interesting look back into the changes in the perceptions of the Charismatic movement within Christian doctrines during the 50 s and into the 80 s in light of the Kathryn Kuhlman ministry The author gives a biographical history for Kathryn Kuhlman and her beginnings in the Pentecostal ministries which were mainly dominated by men during that era She paved the way forward to the future for many believers for divine healing as being acceptable in a modern age Kathryn Kuhlman also promoted the message to all that the Holy Spirit of God could be felt and experienced in each person s life if they believed with their personal faith She always encouraged people to believe in miracles, because that was the key to receiving a miracle in healing through faith Kathryn Kulhman never took personal credit for performing a miracle for anyone Her life and ministry had troubles, and she seemed to have made some unwise choices, but she was steadfast in her faith The author names some of the ministers, evangelists, and prominent figures of Kathryn s time who supported her and those who caused opposition During the time of her ministry, many of the Protestant religions were beginning to accept a Charismatic spirituality rather than having the Holy Spirit be associated with undesirable images of Holy Rollers I suppose it was a subtle change in the Christian culture to consider the possibility of divine intervention such as healing by faith and being moved by the Holy Spirit of God.Personally, I can remember hearing her radio program in the 1970 s when I was a teenager She held many meetings in a city not far from where I lived during the 1970 s.Publication Date March 19, 2019

  6. Nancy Vecina says:

    Just finished reading this book by Amy Collier Artman Ms Artman is a great writer She artfully combines words with facts She opened my eyes to the many possibilities of religion and its leaders At the end of the day, we must always go back to the Bible to know the truth.subokna.wordpress.com 2018 10 02 the Just finished reading this book by Amy Collier Artman Ms Artman is a great writer She artfully combines words with facts She opened my eyes to the many possibilities of religion and its leaders At the end of the day, we must always go back to the Bible to know the truth.subokna.wordpress.com 2018 10 02 the

  7. Robert D. Cornwall says:

    I seem to remember catching a glimpse or two on the TV during my teen years of Kathryn Kuhlman, the miracle lady It was in a period in which I was drawn to a charismatic form of faith Although I ve focused my attention on the story of Aimee Semple McPherson, Kathryn Kuhlman has been in the wings She died during my senior year of high school, while I was part of the denomination Aimee Semple McPherson founded Thus, I must have heard something of this woman and her ministry, but that memory I seem to remember catching a glimpse or two on the TV during my teen years of Kathryn Kuhlman, the miracle lady It was in a period in which I was drawn to a charismatic form of faith Although I ve focused my attention on the story of Aimee Semple McPherson, Kathryn Kuhlman has been in the wings She died during my senior year of high school, while I was part of the denomination Aimee Semple McPherson founded Thus, I must have heard something of this woman and her ministry, but that memory has long faded, except for her name and an image that seemed similar to Sister Aimee.When I saw that Eerdmans was publishing a biography of Kuhlman in its library of Religious Biography a series that includes Edith Blumhofer s biography of Sister Aimee , I decided I needed to read it As I did, thanks to Eerdmans generosity with a review copy, I discovered the true story of this woman whose image was implanted in my mind, but which remained until now largely unpacked Amy Collier Artman, teaches religious studies at Missouri State University She devoted her PhD dissertation at the University of Chicago to exploring Kuhlman s life and her impact on the development of Charismatic Christianity Though she began within traditional Pentecostalism, Kuhlman forged a pathway that led to the emergence of a gentrified Charismatic movement that took root not only in traditional Pentecostal circles but Mainline Protestantism and Catholicism Kuhlman s story, as we discover, has largely been forgotten Although at the peak of her popularity, she was considered with Billy Graham as the most famous religious figure in the United States While Graham was known for his evangelistic work, Kuhlman was known for her healing work though she consistently rejected the title of faith healer Healing was at the center of her ministry, but she largely attributed the healing work to the Holy Spirit not her own actions In large part, the reason she faded into obscurity is that she didn t institutionalize her ministry like Sister Aimee did McPherson built a church and a denomination, the leadership of which was passed on to her son and his successors Kuhlman s legacy, however, was co opted by others, including Oral Roberts and others, some of whom did so in ways that damaged her legacy Benny Hinn Artman takes us from her early life in Concordia, Missouri, to her decision to follow her sister Myrtle and Myrtle s husband on the revival trail It was Myrtle who introduced the young Kuhlman to charismatic Christianity and to healing This was in the 1920s Eventually, Kuhlman would go off on her own, having a sense of her own ministry of preaching She started off emphasizing evangelism, with healing ministry emerging only later.I, of course, read the story with Sister Aimee in mind The two women were similar in some ways They had flawed lives, and yet they persisted in a work that was largely closed to women They forged their way forward in ways that were similar and yet different Kuhlman s popular emergence came after McPherson s death What is interesting is that despite evidence otherwise, Kuhlman tried to distance herself from McPherson, not because she disagrees with her older contemporary, but because she had this sense that her own calling was unique To identify with McPherson would undercut that vision of herself.The book takes us through her early efforts at ministry, which included a disastrous marriage to a fellow evangelist, and her divorce that corresponded with her emergence on a broader scene The key to her broadening popularity came as she moved into television While Aimee Semple McPherson pioneered radio, Kuhlman was able to find an audience on TV, while ministering in the Pittsburgh area What made her unique was the way in which she sought to distance herself from what Artman notes was the ranting Pentecostals and theextravagant independent healers p 59 While criticized, she largely overcame the criticism by tightly controlling her ministry and her image One thing we learn here is how she and others made their way onto TV, at a time when network space was given free to Mainline Protestants through the National Council of Churches, forcing others to purchase time They did so and built media empires that continue to this day, long after that free coverage disappeared The use of media is an important component of Kuhlman s rise to popularity, but it is also an important component in this story While Kuhlman began using TV during the 1950s, developing her own sense of how it could it be used One thing we learn is that Kuhlman didn t broadcast the healings She invited those who claim to be healed to offer testimony Thus, we hear not see That allowed her to maintain acontrolled presentation Then in the 1960s she adopted the newly emerging Talk Show platform, with the birth of her syndicated program I Believe in Miracles, that looked and felt much like a Dinah Shore program For ten years she utilized this vehicle to expand her ministry It is through this vehicle that she was able to influence the direction of the newly emerging charismatic movement She highlighted the stories of people like Dennis Bennett, a charismatic Episcopal priest, and Catholic charismatics as well There was an ecumenical, post Pentecostal message here We also learn how she crafted an image of a woman who, though powerful in her work, sought to portray herself in traditional ways She opposed the rising feminism of the 1960s Though not married and without children, she supported traditional visions for women This helped her overcome criticism She wasn t stepping into roles she shouldn t She was taking on these roles because she could do no other.It s an intriguing story of a woman who crafted an image of herself as depending on solely on God s Spirit She tried to separate herself from those who influenced her life, including and perhaps especially Aimee Semple McPherson We see in this story, like that of Sister Aimee, the attempts by a woman to navigate a religious world that was largely hostile to women in ministry Like McPherson, she claimed she could do no other Unlike McPherson, she didn t institutionalize her legacy, and thus her image faded with time The ending of the story is sad She fell under the influence of unscrupulous figures, who deprived her ministry of resources that could have extended its life After her death, we saw the rise of scandal that marked many of the ministries that tried to take hold of her legacy Artman points out that many of those who followed after her moved in theological directions that Kuhlman always rejected, including the prosperity message that emerged largely after her death.It s an intriguing story It s a sad one as well As one who has read and written about Aimee Semple McPherson, I see the similarities in stories Both women lived largely lonely lives and died younger than one might expect, though the causes of death were very different Her unwillingness to venture out in support of women in ministry will prove disappointing, but we also learn why she made these choices.The story is well told It is both accessible and scholarly It will help readers of our day, who know not her story, to learn something about the emergence of the Charismatic Movement It is also a moving story in its own right If there is anything to note that I wish was different, I would say that it is the lack of images Artman describes in detail the way that Kuhlman presented herself, with her flowing pulpit dresses and bright red hair carefully coiffed We read, but we don t see I realize that photos make publishingexpensive, but a few images would have been helpful to gain a better sense of her life and ministry, for the image was important to the ministry That being said, I hope this book gets a wide readership

  8. Linda Walters says:

    I found this book to be kind of dry although it did have an interesting start If you want a history of the charismatic religious movement then this is probably for you I found it kind of a struggle to work through this book though.I could also sense that just maybe this book was written by someone who was critical of Kathryn Kulhman and her motives Often it came through that she felt like Kathryn was an opportunistic woman, focused on position, influence and or money While I am sure that Kat I found this book to be kind of dry although it did have an interesting start If you want a history of the charismatic religious movement then this is probably for you I found it kind of a struggle to work through this book though.I could also sense that just maybe this book was written by someone who was critical of Kathryn Kulhman and her motives Often it came through that she felt like Kathryn was an opportunistic woman, focused on position, influence and or money While I am sure that Kathryn was not perfect, it was kind of disturbing to see the author s view from her eyes Was Kathryn flamboyant Yes, definitely Was she unusual Once again a strong yes Was she totally authentic That is between her and God I will give the author credit for doing her homework when it came to featuring how Your Faith and Mine episodes ran She was very detailed in her accounts She also included other ministries and what they ran into as they televised healing meetings One particular meeting on TV that I enjoyed reading about was when Kathryn Kuhlman interviewed Adele Carmichael It made me smile when it was described as two giant personalities meeting It made me eveninterested in finding out about Adele I had heard of many of the people and women mentioned in the book But she is someone I don t remember hearing about before This book also featured quite a few other people and their ministries also including others that followed after her and give credit to the fact that she prepared the way for healing ministries Benny Hinn was one that was mentioned after Kathryn s passing Still, my last words on this book would be that I found it sadly.boring I voluntarily read an advanced copy of this book via Netgalley and these are my honest opinions on it

  9. Michelle Kidwell says:

    The Miracle LadyKathryn Kuhlman and the Transformation of Charismatic Christianityby Amy Collier ArtmanWm B Eerdmans Publishing CompanyBiographies Memoirs , Religion SpiritualityPub Date 19 Mar 2019I am reviewing a copy of The Miracle Lady through Wm B Eerdman s Publishing Company and Netgalley Johnny Carson welcomed Kathryn Kulman as a guest of The Tonight Show On October 15.1974 with this I imagine there are very few people who are not aware of Kathryn Kuhlman She probably, along wi The Miracle LadyKathryn Kuhlman and the Transformation of Charismatic Christianityby Amy Collier ArtmanWm B Eerdmans Publishing CompanyBiographies Memoirs , Religion SpiritualityPub Date 19 Mar 2019I am reviewing a copy of The Miracle Lady through Wm B Eerdman s Publishing Company and Netgalley Johnny Carson welcomed Kathryn Kulman as a guest of The Tonight Show On October 15.1974 with this I imagine there are very few people who are not aware of Kathryn Kuhlman She probably, along with Billy Graham, is one of the best known ministers or preachers in the country Billy Graham is better remembered but Kathryn Kulman 1907 1976 was a well known evangelist She preached faith and miracles to millions of people over the fifty five years of ministry She was one of the most important figures in the rise of Charasmatic Christianity.In this book author Amy Collier Artman not only tells the story of Kathryn Kulman s life, and her ministry she also shows how it relates to the story of Charismatic Christianity, particularly on how Charismatic Christianity moved from the fringes of American Society to the mainstream.The Miracle Lady traces Kathryn Kulman s remarkable career as a preacher who was media savy, and it fleshes out Kulman s unconventional character The author shows how Kathryn Kulman skillfully navigated oppressive structures, rules, and landmines that surrounded female religious leaders in conservative culture.I give A Miracle Lady five out of five stars Happy Reading

  10. Joan says:

    Charismatic Christianity is now an accepted form of Christianity in America but it was not always that way Artman takes the life of Katherine Kuhlman as a framework in exploring the movement, including its origins in Pentecostalism.Artman includes the expected aspects of Kuhlman s life, such as her childhood, prior evangelists who influenced her, her early ministry, marriage and divorce, and her use of television She also adds insights into the culture of the time I appreciated her comments o Charismatic Christianity is now an accepted form of Christianity in America but it was not always that way Artman takes the life of Katherine Kuhlman as a framework in exploring the movement, including its origins in Pentecostalism.Artman includes the expected aspects of Kuhlman s life, such as her childhood, prior evangelists who influenced her, her early ministry, marriage and divorce, and her use of television She also adds insights into the culture of the time I appreciated her comments on the fact that Kuhlman was a woman in a time when women could be evangelists but not pastors Artman also includes other insights into the era, such as the use of television and what that meant to culture in general and Christianity specifically.This is a good book for those interested in the history of the American Pentecostal and Charismatic movements Artman has done a good job in explaining how Kuhlman s controversial ministry and healing services related to and shaped those movements She has also done a good job in bringing back to memory such an interesting woman with her flowing gowns and well scripted television programs.I received a complimentary egalley of this book from the publisher My comments are an independent and honest review

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *