Mere Discipleship: Growing in Wisdom and Hope

Mere Discipleship: Growing in Wisdom and Hope❰Reading❯ ➶ Mere Discipleship: Growing in Wisdom and Hope Author Alister E. McGrath – Heartforum.co.uk In exploring Christian discipleship, Alister McGrath encourages readers to move beyond a superficial grasp of their faith to discover its depth and riches He equips readers to grow in wisdom and devel In exploring Christian discipleship, Alister McGrath encourages readers Growing in ePUB ´ to move beyond a superficial grasp of their faith to discover its depth and riches He equips readers to grow Mere Discipleship: PDF or in wisdom and develop an accurate Christian worldview that informs the way they think, imagine, and actHelpfully drawing on the insights of other illuminating writers, including Dorothy L Sayers, Discipleship: Growing in PDF/EPUB å C S Lewis, John Stott, and J I Packer, McGrath offers counsel on holding on to hope while journeying through darkness and on how to live meaningfully in a world in which things don t always seem to make sense.

Alister Edgar McGrath is a Northern Irish theologian, Growing in ePUB ´ priest, intellectual historian, scientist, and Christian apologist He currently holds the Andreas Idreos Professorship in Science and Religion in the Mere Discipleship: PDF or Faculty of Theology and Religion at the University of Oxford, and is Professor of Divinity at Gresham College He was previously Professor of Theology, Ministry, and Education at King Discipleship: Growing in PDF/EPUB å s College London and Head of the Centre for Theology, Religion and Culture, Professor of Historical Theology at the University of Oxford, and was principal of Wycliffe Hall, Oxford, until He is an Anglican priest and is ordained within the Church of EnglandAside from being a faculty member at Oxford, McGrath has also taught at Cambridge University and is a Teaching Fellow at Regent College McGrath holds three doctorates from the University of Oxford, a DPhil in Molecular Biophysics, a Doctor of Divinity in Theology and a Doctor of Letters in Intellectual HistoryMcGrath is noted for his work in historical theology, systematic theology, and the relationship between science and religion, as well as his writings on apologetics He is also known for his opposition to New Atheism and antireligionism and his advocacy of theological critical realism Among his best known books are The Twilight of Atheism, The Dawkins Delusion Atheist Fundamentalism and the Denial of the Divine, Dawkins God Genes, Memes, and the Meaning of Life, and A Scientific Theology He is also the author of a number of popular textbooks on theology.

Mere Discipleship: Growing in Wisdom and Hope MOBI ´
    Mere Discipleship: Growing in Wisdom and Hope MOBI ´ world in which things don t always seem to make sense."/>
  • Paperback
  • 176 pages
  • Mere Discipleship: Growing in Wisdom and Hope
  • Alister E. McGrath
  • 22 December 2017
  • 0801094224

10 thoughts on “Mere Discipleship: Growing in Wisdom and Hope

  1. Harm-Jan says:

    Some quotes Christian discipleship is not about mastering God, but being mastered by God not as an act of craven intellectual submission to someone we fear, but as an act of joyful intellectual enrichment arising from the expansion of our rational and imaginative capacities in response to a captivating vision of God, which ends up setting us free the creative mind, 87 Religious faith is thus not a rebellion against reason but, rather, a principled revolt against the imprisonment of human Some quotes Christian discipleship is not about mastering God, but being mastered by God not as an act of craven intellectual submission to someone we fear, but as an act of joyful intellectual enrichment arising from the expansion of our rational and imaginative capacities in response to a captivating vision of God, which ends up setting us free the creative mind, 87 Religious faith is thus not a rebellion against reason but, rather, a principled revolt against the imprisonment of humanity within the cold and limiting walls of a rationalist dogmatism Human logic may be rationally adequate but it is also existentially deficient Truth, mystery and darkness, 127 This world is God s world and it is to be valued, appreciated, enjoyed Yet it is studded with clues that it is not our real home that there is a still better world beyond its frontiers and that one may dare to hope to enter and inhabit this better place the hope of heaven, 143

  2. Seth says:

    A decent book McGrath uses his former lectures and sermons to compile elements that compose discipleship What I enjoyed most was the middle section where he offered mini biographies on Dorothy Sayers, C.S Lewis, John Stott, and J I Packer.

  3. Norman says:

    In this fairly short book under 200 pages Alister McGrath looks at the issue of discipleship although the book actually looks further afield as well Anyone familiar with McGrath s writings will find the same logical and rigorous thought patterns that characterise his written ministry While there is some overlap with his other writings understandable given his output this is a very good book both for someone relatively new to the Christian faith and those with a deeper understanding That In this fairly short book under 200 pages Alister McGrath looks at the issue of discipleship although the book actually looks further afield as well Anyone familiar with McGrath s writings will find the same logical and rigorous thought patterns that characterise his written ministry While there is some overlap with his other writings understandable given his output this is a very good book both for someone relatively new to the Christian faith and those with a deeper understanding That s one thing I love about McGrath, his ability to explain sometimes complex subjects in simple ways and leave you wanting to dive deeper yourself While the style is largely academic it s what I d call accessibly academic and there are plenty of moments of reflection as well I feel McGrath is underrated as a reflective writer, less well known titles like The Journey testify to this Perhaps the core of McGrath s own thoughts are best summed up in his own words, we need to appreciate that, although Peter and Andrew s journeys of faith may be said to have begun on the shores of Lake Galilee, they certainly did not end there As we read the gospels, we recognise that the disciples faith deepens, both in terms of its intensity and its substance, as they gradually come to understandabout the identity and significance of Jesus of Nazareth and respond to him accordingly The first part of the books offers five reflections on the discipleship of the mind I personally loved the section on Books and the Discipleship of the Mind but then I m a book nerd and their value as a window into other viewpoints whether to agree or disagree McGrath then turns to fairly short but still informative examinations of the thoughts of Dorothy L Sayers, C S Lewis, John Stott and J I Packer Finally he concludes with what are effectively four sermons or reflections although still in a reader friendly academic style which offer hope in times of darkness I also loved his emphasis on getting to know someone s views in their totality rather than just snapshots which can be taken out of context, Whether I am reading C S Lewis or Emil Brunner, I feel myself called on as a scholar to read them properly, carefully, and fully He goes on, Even when reading someone I know I will end up criticising such as Richard Dawkins I still take care to read his works in their totality, not making myself dependent on the kind of disembodied and decontextualized textual snippets that now circulate on the internet Of course not everyone has time to do that so at least I know McGrath haslikely than not done the wider groundwork for me although McGrath would be the first to advise deciding for ourselves I love that despite his academic credentials McGrath retains a deep love for Jesus at the heart of his thinking, Let me return to Stott s landmark statement God s good news is Jesus When I first read those words, I was thrilled I was getting fed up with dry and overintellectualised theories about Jesus Christ.Stott s reflections on some passages on early Christian evangelism in Acts led him to this powerful conclusion, which I hope is uncontroversial Jesus Christ is the heart and soul of the gospel I shall be re reading this book as there s much I want to look at again Recommended

  4. Zac Neubauer says:

    A collection of lectures, sermons and presentations based loosely around the theme of discipleship None particularly stand out although if I were to pick one to hold onto it would be Habits of the Christian Mind The Community of Faith and Personal Growth The chapters tend to be repetitive as one discovers that McGrath owes a great deal to C.S Lewis, Emil Brunner, and his own background is studying physical science Many of the same quotes reappear in each chapter He makes some good point A collection of lectures, sermons and presentations based loosely around the theme of discipleship None particularly stand out although if I were to pick one to hold onto it would be Habits of the Christian Mind The Community of Faith and Personal Growth The chapters tend to be repetitive as one discovers that McGrath owes a great deal to C.S Lewis, Emil Brunner, and his own background is studying physical science Many of the same quotes reappear in each chapter He makes some good points about the discipline of the Christian mind, but in the end the repetition and loose connection of the essays weaken the whole

  5. Kevin Gunn says:

    This is why I read books There are, of course, some people I would have loved to have known as mentors Sadly, I shall never be able to know great writers of the past, such as Augustine of Hippo, Athanasius of Alexandria, or Martin Luther to name only three individuals or to journey alongside them in person and talk to them about their habits of thought, prayer, and adoration Yet I can read their books While this is no substitute for the living presence of a mentor, it allows me to absorb thei This is why I read books There are, of course, some people I would have loved to have known as mentors Sadly, I shall never be able to know great writers of the past, such as Augustine of Hippo, Athanasius of Alexandria, or Martin Luther to name only three individuals or to journey alongside them in person and talk to them about their habits of thought, prayer, and adoration Yet I can read their books While this is no substitute for the living presence of a mentor, it allows me to absorb their ideas and work out how I might benefit from their wisdom Though dead, they still speak to us, offering us encouragement and stimulus.One of those mentors that I would add the list McGrath mentioned would be McGrath himself I would pay to attend one of his lectures, but I doubt that opportunity will happen for me Instead, however, I can engage with McGrath through is writing.McGrath also explains one of the reasons why I like to study Theology That s why good theology leads to worship, in that it confronts us with a vision of God so compelling and overwhelming that we cannot help but adore it on the one hand and fail to put it into words on the other Theology informs our minds without limiting reality to what our minds can enfold, thus alerting us to a greater horizon of divine activity and presence that is best expressed in worship and adoration rather than in theological speculation.There s so much to learn and explore in the Christian faith and the God we serve, and we should never stop learningabout God In this book, McGrath reminds us that we are called to serve Christ with our minds also, Mark 12 30, which we can do by studying theology and reading books.Part of the process of discipleship is the expansion of our minds and souls that arises from a deeper understanding of the Christian faith, stimulated and enlarged by conversations with other wayfarers along the road and the books that have emerged from those journeys The process of discipleship is nourished by the sharing of wisdom and acquired experience within the wandering people of God, who come to see their journey as a process of personal and spiritual growthAs we learn and grow, discipleship is the sharing of that wisdom and knowledge with those around us, and to take it further, sharing it with those outside of the Christian faith.Lately, I ve been wrestling with passages in the Bible such as Luke 9 verses 23 27 where Christ said If anyone would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross daily and follow me McGrath has reminded me that part of that, part of following Christ, is to learn about Him, exploring past and present theologians and texts to expand my knowledge of God and my faith.There s a lotI could quote from this book, such as Stott s idea of double listening , or McGrath s various references to C.S Lewis All in all, this was a good book and has already helped shed some light on my own faith journey I highly recommend this book

  6. David says:

    I really appreciated McGrath s call to a robust discipleship that includes the mind He casts a vision of the development of the mind in discipleship as fresh and necessaryHe also helps us see the need for fresh communication in our culture, discerning the true hunger of our culture while bringing the true hope of the gospel His sketches of various writers and thinkers was a treat Sayers, Stott, Lewis, Tolkien, etc Finally, his appreciation for science while acknowledging its limitations for I really appreciated McGrath s call to a robust discipleship that includes the mind He casts a vision of the development of the mind in discipleship as fresh and necessaryHe also helps us see the need for fresh communication in our culture, discerning the true hunger of our culture while bringing the true hope of the gospel His sketches of various writers and thinkers was a treat Sayers, Stott, Lewis, Tolkien, etc Finally, his appreciation for science while acknowledging its limitations for a meaning are so needed today where many evangelicals disregard science rather than appreciating its purpose

  7. Stefan Grieve says:

    A book that I found interesting, enjoyable and educational to read, that by reading my theological knowledge was increased, as well as learning other interesting things as well.The text s language is well balanced that it is reasonably easy to get into but with the right and rich terminology that befits this theological book The information was well ordered as well.The only criticism is that I think the writer was a bit too much on the defensive on the subject of Richard Dawkins, but it was a m A book that I found interesting, enjoyable and educational to read, that by reading my theological knowledge was increased, as well as learning other interesting things as well.The text s language is well balanced that it is reasonably easy to get into but with the right and rich terminology that befits this theological book The information was well ordered as well.The only criticism is that I think the writer was a bit too much on the defensive on the subject of Richard Dawkins, but it was a minor thing and not too taxing to my reader, it just occurred to me as a mild observation

  8. Jason Wilson says:

    McGrath is on sparkling form here He takes as his theme the Christian life of the mind, the need to engage in the right way with the secular, the mindset of journeying in hope, and other nuggets There are good looks at some prominent modern Christian thinkers and an excellent chapter on the creed as a set of co ordinates Not a nuts and bolts how to live but thinking and feeling.

  9. Julia says:

    I loved this book by Alister McGrath While at times a bit repetitive, it was very readable and presented a unique view on Discipleship, particularly through the lens of C.S Lewis work I really enjoyed the portion of the book where he engaged with four key figures in recent Christian history, discussing how exactly they can teach us about Discipleship Very good read

  10. Steve says:

    More Lectures Than an Actual BookIf you re looking for a book, this isn t it McGrath is an engaging writer Unfortunately his skills won t on display in this book The content was good in parts, but overall I have read better books by the author.

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