The Meaning of Protestant Theology: Luther, Augustine, and the Gospel That Gives Us Christ

The Meaning of Protestant Theology: Luther, Augustine, and the Gospel That Gives Us Christ✮ The Meaning of Protestant Theology: Luther, Augustine, and the Gospel That Gives Us Christ Books ✰ Author Phillip Cary – Heartforum.co.uk This book offers a creative and illuminating discussion of Protestant theology Veteran teacher Phillip Cary explains how Luther s theology arose from the Christian tradition, particularly from the spi This book offers a of Protestant MOBI ☆ creative and illuminating discussion of Protestant theology Veteran teacher Phillip Cary explains how Luther s theology arose from the Christian tradition, particularly from the spirituality of Augustine Luther departed from the Augustinian tradition and inaugurated distinctively Protestant theology when he identified the gospel that gives us Christ as its key concept More than any other theologian, Luther succeeds in carrying out the Protestant intention of putting faith in the gospel of Christ alone Cary also explores the consequences of Luther s teachings as they unfold in The Meaning eBook Ê the history of Protestantism.

Is a well known of Protestant MOBI ☆ author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Meaning of Protestant Theology: Luther, Augustine, and the Gospel That Gives Us Christ book, this is one of the most wanted Phillip Cary author readers around the world.

The Meaning of Protestant Theology: Luther, Augustine, and
  • Paperback
  • 384 pages
  • The Meaning of Protestant Theology: Luther, Augustine, and the Gospel That Gives Us Christ
  • Phillip Cary
  • 11 December 2019
  • 0801039452

10 thoughts on “The Meaning of Protestant Theology: Luther, Augustine, and the Gospel That Gives Us Christ

  1. Floyd says:

    My first thought as I began to read the opening pages of Phillip Cary s book The Meaning of Protestant Theology was that I had picked up a boring, poorly written book that would be difficult to recommend for an average reader.That was my impression of the introduction I thought I was looking at a book written for the very intelligent, scholarly reader, a class into which I do not place myself I read all the introduction and my opinion did not change It did not seem fair, however, to judge My first thought as I began to read the opening pages of Phillip Cary s book The Meaning of Protestant Theology was that I had picked up a boring, poorly written book that would be difficult to recommend for an average reader.That was my impression of the introduction I thought I was looking at a book written for the very intelligent, scholarly reader, a class into which I do not place myself I read all the introduction and my opinion did not change It did not seem fair, however, to judge a book solely by its introduction, so I began chapter 1 I found a readable, interesting essay discussing the work of Plato as assimilated by early Christian writers This sets the foundation for the book which is designed to follow the thoughts of Plato to Augustine to Luther and the Reformation The book is readable and interesting, unlike the introduction The book will be of interest to those interested in the development of Protestant Lutheran theology through history though the writer clearly states that he has no desire of leaving the reader a devotee of Luther s teaching the author clearly states that he is Episcopalian Not a systematic theology, but clearly rooted in the discipline of historical theology Though not knowledgeable in this field, I found the book interesting and relatively easy to read as, to me, an introduction to historical theology The book probably would not find a home in most local church libraries, though individual pastors with an interest in pre Christian philosophy, early Christian theology, and the development of early Protestant thought may find it of interest Most seminaries, both Protestant and Catholic, would find a place for this book in their collections as it begins by exploring the connection between Platonism and Augustine and ends by exploring the connection between Plato, Augustine, and Luther.______________This review is based on a free electronic copy provided by the publisher for the purpose of creating this review The opinions expressed are my own

  2. Parker McGoldrick says:

    Simply beautiful This book opened my eyes to true Lutheran and Protestant theology it s history and ongoing influence in the church Phillip Cary did well at explaining Platonism, Augustine s spirituality, Luthers Gospel, Calvin s shortcomings, and pastoral implications in such clear albeit repetitive language We can know nothing of Christ apart from the Gospel.

  3. Paul says:

    The thesis of this book is important, but the book has some serious flaws The crux of Protestant theology is that the gospel acts like a sacrament it is a promise sign that actually gives what it signifies Believing the gospel means believing a word that says you and means me This is the promise of the gospel, of baptism and of the Lord s Supper This very connection rocked my world and made me paedobaptist a few years ago, but I had never heard this worded by someone else until readi The thesis of this book is important, but the book has some serious flaws The crux of Protestant theology is that the gospel acts like a sacrament it is a promise sign that actually gives what it signifies Believing the gospel means believing a word that says you and means me This is the promise of the gospel, of baptism and of the Lord s Supper This very connection rocked my world and made me paedobaptist a few years ago, but I had never heard this worded by someone else until reading this book I did not know Luther wrote so much about reflective faith and about the gospel as a sacrament.Luther s struggles and the solutions he found in the gospel are a refreshing reminder that God wants us to be assured of our salvation Luther s theological project explains how that assurance is found in the external means of grace and not as a result of introspection Faith is always a turn outward, not inward Cary leaves some questions unanswered, but that basic principle he communicates well.As a side note, the Federal Vision conversation about the objectivity of the covenant, at its best, was trying to address this same problem from a different angle, before the whole thing fell off a cliff.Cary s historical theology is one of the book s major flaws The chapters on the backgrounds of Augustine and Plato were helpful, but he overplays the antithesis between them He does not read Calvin right, and even Augustine and Luther are misrepresented.One of the other mistakes is Cary s trashing of the beatific vision The opposition between a theology of hearing Luther and a theology of seeing Platonically, Augustine is developed throughout the book, but I kept waiting for him to redeem, correct or improve the beatific vision towards the end, but it seems to be thrown out with Plato s bathwater.The further you get through the book, therepetitive it seemed to get Perhaps that was because I understood the problem he was tackling early on having encountered it before , but the advantage to the book s length is that by the end of the book Cary clearly gets his point across in a number of ways.Cary s assaults upon self reflective faith will not please credobaptists

  4. Andrew McNeely says:

    This is a really good book one that summarizes much of what Cary has been writing on for the last 20 years Cary believes that the Augustinian tradition continues to carry with it a Platonist spirituality that is antithetical to the Gospel that Luther presented Yay for Platonist metaphysics, nay for Platonist epistemology I still don t think Cary takes quite seriously Augustine s biblical turn in the 390 s This turn helped Augustine to see the external asvalid in his understanding of This is a really good book one that summarizes much of what Cary has been writing on for the last 20 years Cary believes that the Augustinian tradition continues to carry with it a Platonist spirituality that is antithetical to the Gospel that Luther presented Yay for Platonist metaphysics, nay for Platonist epistemology I still don t think Cary takes quite seriously Augustine s biblical turn in the 390 s This turn helped Augustine to see the external asvalid in his understanding of the sacraments and how it became intrinsic to his Ecclesiology

  5. Todd Hains says:

    An excellent book exploring Luther s sacramental understanding of the gospel and God s word.

  6. Kirk says:

    I d give this book five shining stars, but chapters 5 and 6 left me wondering why Cary s understanding of Luther s theology of the cross is narrowly confined to his early understanding of justification as a penitential process without the gospel The footnotes and bibliography shed no light on this mystery they ignore nearly all the literature I also hope he ll writeon how he isn t a Lutheran He says he disagrees with some Lutheran assumptions, but the views he brilliantly articulates t I d give this book five shining stars, but chapters 5 and 6 left me wondering why Cary s understanding of Luther s theology of the cross is narrowly confined to his early understanding of justification as a penitential process without the gospel The footnotes and bibliography shed no light on this mystery they ignore nearly all the literature I also hope he ll writeon how he isn t a Lutheran He says he disagrees with some Lutheran assumptions, but the views he brilliantly articulates throughout the book are remote from any major current of Anglicanism

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