Brainstorm: Detective Stories from the World of Neurology

Brainstorm: Detective Stories from the World of Neurology➫ Brainstorm: Detective Stories from the World of Neurology Read ➳ Author Suzanne O'Sullivan – Heartforum.co.uk A leading neurologist recounts some of her most astonishing, challenging cases, which demonstrate how crucial the study of epilepsy has been to our understanding of the brain Brainstorm follows the st Stories from Kindle Ò A leading neurologist recounts some of her most astonishing, challenging cases, which Brainstorm: Detective PDF or demonstrate how crucial the study of epilepsy has been to our understanding of Detective Stories from PDF/EPUB Ã the brain Brainstorm follows the stories of people whose medical diagnoses are so strange even their doctor struggles to know how to solve them A man who sees cartoon characters running across the room a girl whose world suddenly seems completely distorted, as though she were Alice in Wonderland another who transforms into a ragdoll whenever she even thinks about movingThe brain is the most complex structure in the universe Neurologists must puzzle out life changing diagnoses from the tiniest of clues, the ultimate medical detective work In this riveting book, Suzanne O Sullivan takes you with her as she tracks the clues of her patients symptoms It s a journey that will open your eyes to the unfathomable intricacies of our brains and the infinite variety of human experience.

Stories from Kindle Ò Is a well known author, some of his books are a fascination Brainstorm: Detective PDF or for readers like in the Brainstorm: Detective Stories from the World of Neurology Detective Stories from PDF/EPUB Ã book, this is one of the most wanted Suzanne OSullivan author readers around the world.

Brainstorm: Detective Stories from the World of Neurology
    Brainstorm: Detective Stories from the World of Neurology strange even their doctor struggles to know how to solve them A man who sees cartoon characters running across the room a girl whose world suddenly seems completely distorted, as though she were Alice in Wonderland another who transforms into a ragdoll whenever she even thinks about movingThe brain is the most complex structure in the universe Neurologists must puzzle out life changing diagnoses from the tiniest of clues, the ultimate medical detective work In this riveting book, Suzanne O Sullivan takes you with her as she tracks the clues of her patients symptoms It s a journey that will open your eyes to the unfathomable intricacies of our brains and the infinite variety of human experience."/>
  • Audio CD
  • Brainstorm: Detective Stories from the World of Neurology
  • Suzanne O'Sullivan
  • 22 February 2019
  • 1978638655

10 thoughts on “Brainstorm: Detective Stories from the World of Neurology

  1. Rebecca says:

    This is a book about epilepsy I m not sure why that isn t made explicit in the title, subtitle or blurb perhaps it s a controversial condition, one with negative associations, or it just sounds like too technical a word The air of mystery the subtitle tries to give is a bit misleading, then despite the very different ways in which these dozen or so patients present, they re all prone to seizures the guesswork is in determining precisely what is going wrong in the brain, and where, as well a This is a book about epilepsy I m not sure why that isn t made explicit in the title, subtitle or blurb perhaps it s a controversial condition, one with negative associations, or it just sounds like too technical a word The air of mystery the subtitle tries to give is a bit misleading, then despite the very different ways in which these dozen or so patients present, they re all prone to seizures the guesswork is in determining precisely what is going wrong in the brain, and where, as well as how medicines or surgery could address the fault There are still farunknowns than knowns where the brain is concerned, O Sullivan writes The brain has a mind of its own, she wryly adds later on Epilepsy affects 600,000 people in the UK and 50 million worldwide, so it s an important condition to know about.Luckily, O Sullivan s writing has come on tremendously since her last book, It s All in Your Head, which was absorbing though not very well written Here she comes across as much less robotic in her dealings with patients, and the case studies are written up as full, rounded stories One might dispute the inclusion of the Sharon chapter, which is about dissociative seizures although it s a handy link from her previous book into this one, it s still an odd one out Mostly, it is fascinating to see the range of behaviors seizures can be associated with not just the stereotyped convulsing on the ground, but ominous pointing, cartoon visions of the Seven Dwarves, sudden running, cursing, fumbling around, or a total loss of muscle tone Very enjoyable for anyone who likes medical reads.Favorite lines The practice of medicine requires the doctor to know the facts and figures of diseases and their treatments The art of medicine follows the narrative and gives meaning and context to the patient s story I am drawn to my patients backstories In remembering something the brain may need to draw on sound, vision and smell and reconstruct the memory piece by piece from information stored in different brain areas That is one of the reasons that memories are so unreliable To remember something the brain must replay a pattern of neural connections that originally occurred in response to a particular event Those connections between cells are unstable and are subject to change every time they are activated Not every replay is the same each risks adjusting the memory just a little We know that our thoughts and consciousness, our personalities and occupations, are inextricable from the physical reality of our brains But, even knowing that, it sometimes feels that we can t take the next step to what that really means If you have a brain disease you are very vulnerable to developing a mental disorder alongside it

  2. Rawa& says:

    This made me realize I m still as passionate about neurology as I ever was

  3. Essam Munir says:

    If you hear the word epilepsy and the picture of someone convulsing violently comes into your mind, then you re one of the majority of people who need to read this book.I once remember sitting in a bus when a man leaned towards me and pushed me against the window, I didn t know what s happening with him and I thought he was sleeping but it was unusual for someone sleeping to lean this much I was angry deep inside but I didn t say anything The man, after a minute or so, composed himself and s If you hear the word epilepsy and the picture of someone convulsing violently comes into your mind, then you re one of the majority of people who need to read this book.I once remember sitting in a bus when a man leaned towards me and pushed me against the window, I didn t know what s happening with him and I thought he was sleeping but it was unusual for someone sleeping to lean this much I was angry deep inside but I didn t say anything The man, after a minute or so, composed himself and sit in his chair without apologizing but I noticed he was profusely sweaty I didn t give it a second thought, I just thought of him as a rude person In retrospect, I know he was having a seizure but I haven t noticed that as he was not convulsing Now I know he was having a tonic seizure in which his body becomes rigid Now, imagine someone rushing aggressively against you, punching you, saying inappropriate things, burst into your house, waking up late at night and looking towards the wall as if there s a ghost in the room How would you think of them Well, you need this book to get to knowabout The Sacred Disease

  4. Naori says:

    So incredibly fascinating I was intrigued because of my own rare neurological disorder but now it seems like a common cold compared to these cases While these are real life conditions this would definitely fallinto an entertainment category than anything close to clinical Definitely an interesting read.

  5. Jo says:

    O Sullivan is a neurologist specialising in epilepsy and this second book of hers recounts some of the interesting cases she s dealt with She comes across as a caring professional who only wants the best for her patients I also truly learnt a lot as my only experience of epilepsy is tv dramas where they all flail about on the ground I now know that seizures can manifest in all sorts of weird and scary ways This is a must read if you re interested in all things brain.

  6. Laura says:

    Having devoured the authors first book I was looking forward to reading her next as before, her writing is entirely familiar to those working in the medical field but perhaps to the lay person maybe a bit tough to decipher While I enjoyed this book and the patients stories, I felt a little deceived just because I expected the book to cover a variety of diseases and illnesses affecting the brain However, only epilepsy is discussed and while that is a fascinating subject for those interested in Having devoured the authors first book I was looking forward to reading her next as before, her writing is entirely familiar to those working in the medical field but perhaps to the lay person maybe a bit tough to decipher While I enjoyed this book and the patients stories, I felt a little deceived just because I expected the book to cover a variety of diseases and illnesses affecting the brain However, only epilepsy is discussed and while that is a fascinating subject for those interested in neurology, it s not what I had anticipated.Epilepsy is a complex and poorly understood brain disorder, and the author is an expert in her field so it was brilliant to have her stories so well defined The author acknowledges the challenges of diagnosing the disease and planning treatments At times the book felt a little repetitive but I still enjoyed it for the most part Would I read her next book Absolutely

  7. Flapper72 says:

    A fantastic book Informative, thought provoking, educational I have already read, It s all in the Head which I really enjoyed which is why I decided to read this book too I think it was even better than the first Each chapter is about a different person and their challenges with a condition that has been diagnosed as epilepsy It s amazing I think that, in the twenty first century, people think that investigations give answer and yet Dr O Sullivan is very clear that it s all in the histor A fantastic book Informative, thought provoking, educational I have already read, It s all in the Head which I really enjoyed which is why I decided to read this book too I think it was even better than the first Each chapter is about a different person and their challenges with a condition that has been diagnosed as epilepsy It s amazing I think that, in the twenty first century, people think that investigations give answer and yet Dr O Sullivan is very clear that it s all in the history listening to first hand witnesses, listening to patients and, if possible, getting video evidence She then explains to us how, someone with such amazing functional anatomical knowledge, is able to work out precisely where in the brain the problem starts and how that can, possibly, be treated An astounding book Informative, educational and humbling I really can t recommend this book highly enough

  8. Sookie says:

    On my father s side of the family, there is a troubling history with neuropathology Epilepsy is one among them This book elaborates on multiple ways this can appear with our without trauma and sometimes, its just brain chemistry Each year, my anxiety grows as if am waiting for my inevitable fate.

  9. Olga_evstifeeva says:

    A good entertaining read on a serious topic Sometimes it was fun, sometimes scary, but that s what life of an epileptic is Not much systematic neurological information, but then again it s not a classbook, it s a bunch of patients stories with some theory in addition.

  10. Eleanor says:

    Although it s subtitled Detective Stories From the World of Neurology , Suzanne O Sullivan s new book, Brainstorm, is really a series of case studies of epilepsy Detective stories isn t too far off, though all stories of diagnosis are stories of detection this is made abundantly clear in, for instance, the structure of each episode of House it s also maybe why Hugh Laurie s character in it has the substance abuse and anger management personal life issues that we expect from our noir detec Although it s subtitled Detective Stories From the World of Neurology , Suzanne O Sullivan s new book, Brainstorm, is really a series of case studies of epilepsy Detective stories isn t too far off, though all stories of diagnosis are stories of detection this is made abundantly clear in, for instance, the structure of each episode of House it s also maybe why Hugh Laurie s character in it has the substance abuse and anger management personal life issues that we expect from our noir detectives discuss In twelve chapters, each focusing on one of O Sullivan s patients, we get glimpses of epilepsy symptoms that are rare, misunderstood, misdiagnosed, and sometimes not epilepsy at all At the very least, Brainstorm is a very illuminating book about what seizures sometimes look like, and the ways in which they can be completely misinterpreted by the public One of her patients, for instance, gets a kind of localised Tourette s his seizures involve swearing and spitting If he has a seizure in public, he risks not only disapproval and embarrassment, but arrest I wantedof this from O Sullivan, actually She doesn t, for example, acknowledge that her black male patients face a much higher chance of being arrested, injured or killed for displaying abnormal social behaviour There is a certain level of voyeuristic fascination in O Sullivan s case studies that drives readerly interest We learn about August, a bright young woman whose seizures make her compulsively bolt from rooms and across streets Maya, an elderly Nigerian woman who suffers blackouts and sometimes finds herself miles from home Wahid, whose family paid thousands to various local healers and pastors before his condition was diagnosed not as spirit possession but as epilepsy O Sullivan is simultaneously compassionate and objective about each of her patients she clearly cares for their well being, but also strives to view the evidence as thoroughly and impartially as possible Her notes on the development of technology used in diagnosing neurological problems CAT scans, MRI and fMRI machines, the merits and demerits of brain surgery are informative, detailed and accessible Sometimes there s a slight stiffness to the prose, but she s a doctor who writes, not a professional poet, and it s a small price to pay for the rest of the book s informativeness and optimistic outlook on the future of neurology

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