Necropolis

Necropolis✅ Necropolis PDF / Epub ⚣ Author Vladislav Khodasevich – Heartforum.co.uk Necropolis is an unconventional literary memoir from Vladislav Khodasevich, hailed by Vladimir Nabokov as the greatest Russian poet of our time In each of the book s nine chapters, Khodasevich memoria Necropolis is an unconventional literary memoir from Vladislav Khodasevich, hailed by Vladimir Nabokov as the greatest Russian poet of our time In each of the book s nine chapters, Khodasevich memorializes a significant figure of Russia s literary Silver Age, and in the process writes an insightful obituary of the eraWritten at various times throughout the s and s following the deaths of its subjects, Necropolis is a literary graveyard in which an entire movement, Russian Symbolism, is buried Recalling Fyodor Sologub, Sergey Esenin, and others, Khodasevich tells the story of how their lives and artworks intertwined, including a notoriously tempestuous love triangle among Nina Petrovskaia, Valery Briusov, and Andrey Bely He testifies to the seductive and often devastating power of the Symbolist attempt to turn one s life into a work of art and, ultimately, how one man was left to deal with the task of memorializing his fellow artists after their deaths Khodasevich s portraits deal with revolution, disillusionment, emigration, suicide, the vocation of the poet, and the place of the artist in society One of the greatest memoirs in Russian literature, Necropolis is a compelling work from an overlooked writer whose gifts for observation and irony show the early twentieth century Russian literary scene in a new and intimate light.

Vladislav Felitsianovich Khodasevich Russian May , June , was an influential Russian poet and literary critic who presided over the Berlin circle of Russian emigre litterateursKhodasevich was born in Moscow into a family of Felitsian Khodasevich, a Polish nobleman, and Sofiia Iakovlevna n e Brafman , a Jewish woman who converted to Christianity His cousin Nadia Khodasevich married Fernand Leger He left the Moscow University after understanding that poetry was his true vocation Khodasevich s first collections of poems, Youth and A Happy Little House , were subsequently discarded by him as immatureIn the year , Khodasevich gained wider renown by writing a superb short piece The Way of Corn, a reflection on the biblical image of wheat as a plant that cannot live if it does not first die This poem is eponymous with Khodasevich s best known collection of verse, first published in and revised in Patronized by Maxim Gorky, Khodasevich and his wife Nina Berberova herself a distinguished litt rateur, left Russia for Gorky s villa in Sorrento, Italy Later they moved to Berlin, where they took up with Andrei Bely Khodasevich s complicated relationship with this maverick genius ended with a scandalous rupture, followed by the latter s return to Moscow In his memoirs, Bely presented an unforgettable, expressionistic, and very partial portrayal of KhodasevichDuring his first years in Berlin, Khodasevich wrote his two last and most metaphysical collections of verse, Heavy Lyre and European Night The former contained the most important rendition of Orpheus theme in the Russian poetry, the esoteric Ballad Khodasevich didn t align himself with any of the aesthetic movements of the day, claiming Pushkin to be his only model He even penned several scholarly articles exploring the master stroke of the great Russian poetIn the mid s, Khodasevich switched his literary activities from poetry to criticism He joined Mark Aldanov and Alexander Kerensky as the co editor of the Berlin periodical Days, in which he would publish his penetrating analyses of the contemporary Soviet literature He also indulged in a prolonged controversy with the Parisian emigre pundits, such as Georgy Adamovich and Georgy Ivanov, on various issues of literary theory As an influential critic, Khodasevich did his best to encourage the career of Vladimir Nabokov, who would always cherish his memoryDespite a physical infirmity that gradually took hold of him, Khodasevich worked relentlessly during the last decade of his life Most notably, he wrote an important biography of Gavrila Derzhavin translated into English and published by University of Wisconsin Press in in , which he attempted to style in the language of Pushkin s epoch Several weeks before Khodasevich s death his brilliant book of memoirs, Necropolis, was published Although severely partisan, the book is invaluable for its ingenious characterizations of Maxim Gorky, Andrei Bely, and Mikhail Gershenzon.

Paperback  ✓ Necropolis PDF/EPUB Ä
    Import EPUB to the Program Import EPUB is buried Recalling Fyodor Sologub, Sergey Esenin, and others, Khodasevich tells the story of how their lives and artworks intertwined, including a notoriously tempestuous love triangle among Nina Petrovskaia, Valery Briusov, and Andrey Bely He testifies to the seductive and often devastating power of the Symbolist attempt to turn one s life into a work of art and, ultimately, how one man was left to deal with the task of memorializing his fellow artists after their deaths Khodasevich s portraits deal with revolution, disillusionment, emigration, suicide, the vocation of the poet, and the place of the artist in society One of the greatest memoirs in Russian literature, Necropolis is a compelling work from an overlooked writer whose gifts for observation and irony show the early twentieth century Russian literary scene in a new and intimate light."/>
  • Paperback
  • 304 pages
  • Necropolis
  • Vladislav Khodasevich
  • 10 May 2019
  • 023118705X

10 thoughts on “Necropolis

  1. Sophie says:

    , Petrovskaya Bely Esenin Gorky, , literary Silver Age.

  2. Mandy says:

    What a delight this book was In each of the nine chapters, poet Vladislav Khodasevich talks about one of the seminal figures from Russia s Silver Age of the 1920s and 1930s, from Esenin to Gorky, Blok to Bely and others He knew all of these writers, associated with them frequently and brings them to life on the page The early 20s were a vibrant and exciting time in Russia but also a very challenging tone, and sometimes it was a challenge simply to survive Hunger and poverty affected them all What a delight this book was In each of the nine chapters, poet Vladislav Khodasevich talks about one of the seminal figures from Russia s Silver Age of the 1920s and 1930s, from Esenin to Gorky, Blok to Bely and others He knew all of these writers, associated with them frequently and brings them to life on the page The early 20s were a vibrant and exciting time in Russia but also a very challenging tone, and sometimes it was a challenge simply to survive Hunger and poverty affected them all Khodasevich writes with insight and honesty, never flattering his subjects and is quite sharp at times He felt free to express himself openly as he wrote after his subjects death I found the book a brilliantly evocative portrait of the time and place and it s a fascinating literary memoir which will appeal to any lover of Russian literature

  3. Bryn Hammond says:

    Necropolis is a morbid title and may mislead it seems so named mainly because he wrote his sketches of people after their deaths, so it s a set of obituaries Honest memoirs Gorky, after reading a previous that isn t too flattering, urged the author to do him, too, when he s gone Gorky comes out of the treatment rather splendidly, although his devotion to lies is portrayed both in its ideal aspects where dreams of betterment are too rare and precious to kill with a truth and in its qu Necropolis is a morbid title and may mislead it seems so named mainly because he wrote his sketches of people after their deaths, so it s a set of obituaries Honest memoirs Gorky, after reading a previous that isn t too flattering, urged the author to do him, too, when he s gone Gorky comes out of the treatment rather splendidly, although his devotion to lies is portrayed both in its ideal aspects where dreams of betterment are too rare and precious to kill with a truth and in its quotidian inexplicable outcomes There are a few wonderful character studies It didn t much affect my interest whether I d heard of the figure or whether they were minor writers or failed attempters Their lives intersect in the first two decades of the Russian 20th century Symbolists, most of them, poets and prose The memoirist can be sharp but not bitchy, and is often poignant on his friends and acquaintance Content note suicides But I thought the same when I read Tchaikovsky The Quest for the Inner Man, which ended about when this book began this society needs suicide prevention I read an ARC from NetGalley Unfortunately the Introduction wasn t yet in place I ll want to catch up with that when the book is published

  4. Diletta says:

    Tra due rivoluzioni, quadri perfetti, che sembrano immobili.

  5. Dmitriy Slepov says:

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  6. Glinsky says:

    Delicious.Several years after Khodasevich published, Bely offered the following opinion of his interlocutor, , , , , , ,That said, several of the essays on Petrovskaya, Muni, Gershenzon, and Gorky are very b Delicious.Several years after Khodasevich published, Bely offered the following opinion of his interlocutor, , , , , , ,That said, several of the essays on Petrovskaya, Muni, Gershenzon, and Gorky are very benign, tender even.So, next I need to read his wife s memoirs concerning some of the same events

  7. Aleksandra Ershova says:

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  8. Solarita says:

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  9. Sannidhi Shukla says:

    i picked up this book after an evening i spent hanging out with adesh and reading at a bar near my house i told him that i don t think i ve really ever read non fiction outside of things i had to read for school and he said that he s been reading and enjoying non fiction waythan fiction these days, so i felt like it was maybe time for me to getinto reading non fiction too.when i went to the bookstore the next day, i was stuck between whether i should buy this or a didion book and i i picked up this book after an evening i spent hanging out with adesh and reading at a bar near my house i told him that i don t think i ve really ever read non fiction outside of things i had to read for school and he said that he s been reading and enjoying non fiction waythan fiction these days, so i felt like it was maybe time for me to getinto reading non fiction too.when i went to the bookstore the next day, i was stuck between whether i should buy this or a didion book and i chose this purely because i had never seen it before and i wasn t sure if i would ever see it again, unlike the didion i had no previous experience with or really interest in the subject matter russian poets but that didn t much concern me.i honestly enjoyed this book a lotthan i expected to going in some of the portraits painted by khodasevich feel so grand and dreamy and i loved that it was about so many symbolist poets because i really do love french symbolist poetry and this made me understand what draws me to it so much.still, some parts of the book were quite boring to me when khodasevich talked about the qualities within these people s poetry, i sort of tuned out because i m not very well versed in poetry, let alone these writers bodies of work in specific, and i certainly didn t feel like i was gaining much by seeing excerpts of these people s work in translation.overall i do think i quite liked it and i especially enjoyed gaining a clearer sense of who, exactly khodasevich himself is by reading through his interactions with other poets it definitely made me interested in keeping on readingnon fiction in the future i m not sure i would recommend this book to someone else, though, unless they had a keen interest in and understanding of russian literature poetry and maybe knew how to read russian as well.idk i think i also rated this lower than i maybe should have because i am feeling insecure about giving too consistently high ratings and i want people to see me as a discriminating consumer but also because rn i am really craving a book that will really knock me off my feet and keep me up all night and unfortunately this book was in the wrong place at the wrong time and did not deliver

  10. Theediscerning says:

    Three and a half stars.This publishing strand has either frustrated me or made me really quite pleased, depending on the results from its expeditions into the depths of long tail Russian literature Certainly even theaudience friendly pieces in their output aren t exactly going to rush off the shelves But here they would appear to have excelled themselves, and plumbed even further, for we have a collection of essays, by a bloke we ve never heard of, all in response and in memoriam to the Three and a half stars.This publishing strand has either frustrated me or made me really quite pleased, depending on the results from its expeditions into the depths of long tail Russian literature Certainly even theaudience friendly pieces in their output aren t exactly going to rush off the shelves But here they would appear to have excelled themselves, and plumbed even further, for we have a collection of essays, by a bloke we ve never heard of, all in response and in memoriam to the lives of Russian and Soviet authors we ve mostly never heard of, all of whom were connected by one artistic style, which yup, you guessed it But actually in getting the pieces in this order, we almost get a novelistic narrative Certainly the book reads as if it might as well be a novel, so little do we know of these characters before finding them here We open with a woman who suffered a lot of tragedy, partly at least a result of two men and we then encounter those each in turn, with their own lives to be conveyed Yes, I had heard of Blok, and of course Gorky, but what we get from our ignorance is a kind of construction of linked short stories, and as a result the book is actually a lotreadable by the average audience member than it would at first appear No, not all the chapters completely fit my theory, and no novel would have as many people top themselves as here But still, likes and dislikes, affairs, publishing or rubbishing, these authors did a lot in concert or in opposition with each another, and the details of those here may be dry, and intended to be academic and educative, but I also found them to be woven together just as tightly as any fictional iteration of the same contents For that surprise I think this is one of theintriguing volumes from this imprint, even if it will still never appeal to many

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