Wilma's Way Home: The Life of Wilma Mankiller




      Wilma's Way Home: The Life of Wilma Mankiller
As a child in Oklahoma, Wilma Mankiller experienced the Cherokee practice of Gadugi, helping each other, even when times were hard for everyone But in 1956, the federal government uprooted her family and moved them to California, wrenching them from their home, friends, and traditions Separated from her community and everything she knew, Wilma felt utterly lost until she found refuge in the Indian Center in San Francisco There, she worked to build and develop the local Native community and championed Native political activists She took her two children to visit tribal communities in the state, and as she introduced them to the traditions of their heritage, she felt a longing for home.Returning to Oklahoma with her daughters, Wilma took part in Cherokee government Despite many obstacles, from resistance to female leadership to a life threatening accident, Wilma s courageous dedication to serving her people led to her election as the first female chief of the Cherokee Nation As leader and advocate, she reinvigorated her constituency by empowering them to identify and solve community problems.This beautiful addition to the Big Words series will inspire future leaders to persevere in empathy and thoughtful problem solving, reaching beyond themselves to help those around them Moving prose by award winning author Doreen Rappaport is interwoven with Wilma s own words in this expertly researched biography, illustrated with warmth and vivacity by Linda Kukuk. Read Wilma's Way Home: The Life of Wilma Mankiller – heartforum.co.uk

Doreen Rappaport has written many books of fiction and nonfiction for young readers, specializing in thoroughly researched multicultural history, historical fiction, retellings of folktales and myths, and stories of those she calls the not yet celebrated Among her recent books is Martin s Big Words The Life of Dr Martin Luther King, Jr., illustrated by Bryan Collier, which received a Caldecott Honor Award and a Coretta Scott King Honor Award for illustration Doreen Rappaport divides her time between New York City and a rural village in upstate New York.


      Wilma's Way Home: The Life of Wilma Mankiller
 By Doreen Rappaport IBN : 1484747186 Format : Hardcover – heartforum.co.uk
  • Hardcover
  • 48 pages
  • Wilma's Way Home: The Life of Wilma Mankiller
  • Doreen Rappaport
  • 17 December 2018
  • 1484747186

10 thoughts on “ Wilma's Way Home: The Life of Wilma Mankiller

  1. Stacey says:

    Wilma Mankiller represents the best of what a leader can be She empowered, believed in, advocated for, and helped people.Prior to reading this picture book I knew little about Wilma Mankiller, but now I am inspired to learn , and to follow her leadership example.

  2. Urbandale Library says:

    A very informative book yet still approachable for a young reader I was so surprised to learn the major divides between tribal and white communities, male and female tribal roles It was quite eye opening for both me and my niece to reflect and share our emotions about the book UPL Library Staff

  3. Meredith Spidel says:

    Wow Hearing and learning the truth of our nation s history can be so very poignant thankful for this book from Disney Books for making it real in a relatable way for our kiddos Cheering them on for these star efforts in educating all of us

  4. Jill says:

    Wilma Pearl Mankiller, born in Oklahoma in 1945 of mixed parents, was an activist, social worker, community developer and the first woman elected to serve as Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation Wilma did not grow up in Oklahoma in 1956 the federal government moved her family to San Francisco as part of the Bureau of Indian Affairs relocation program The family did not want to leave but had no choice Wilma, mocked at school for her name and her background, kept running away, u...

  5. Nick says:

    This short book about an amazing woman is one that should be included in school and library collections Wilma Mankiller and her family faced very modern, very understandable problems in life, but they were combined with bad government policies and petty bigotry at all levels She fought against those things, and for a better life for her family and not only the Cherokee, but all of the people in her home state of Oklahoma From little things like providing running water to people who had never This short book about an amazing woman is one that should be included in school and library collections Wilma Mankiller and her family faced very modern, very understandable problems in life, but they were combined with bad government policies and petty bigotry at all levels She fought against those things, and for a better life for her family and not only the Cherokee, but all of the people in her home state of Oklahoma From little things like providing running water...

  6. Claudia says:

    What a powerful story What a powerful womansuch a part of this state and our history The book is told in beautiful art and words that seem to be free verse poetrybut on every page, there is a quote from Mankillerin her own words This book tells the good and the not so good The move from Oklahoma, being so lonely in San Francisco, her early marriage and her determination to learn She was involved in the uprising in 1969 at Alcatraz She continued to look for ways to connect with her What a powerful story What a powerful womansuch a part of this state and our history The book is told in beautiful art and words that seem to be free verse poetrybut on every page, there is a quote from Mankillerin her own words This book tells the good and the not so good The move from Oklahoma, being so lonely in San Francisco, her early marriage and her determination to learn She was involved in the uprising in 1969 at Alcatraz She continued to look for ways ...

  7. Janet says:

    I knew who Wilma Mankiller was, but not any details of her life This was an excellent read and I loved how Doreen Rappaport uses quotes from Mankiller within the text I was unaware that the Federal government had a policy in 1956 to relocate Native Americans to urban areas and Mankiller s father relocated the family to San Francisco I will be reading move about this policy as well as readingof the biographies written by Rappaport.As evidenced in this biography, Wilma was a woman very ca I knew who Wilma Mankiller was, but not any details of her life This was an excellent read and I loved how Doreen Rappaport uses quotes from Mankiller within the text I was unaware that the Federal government had a policy in 1956 to relocate Native Americans to urban areas and Mankiller s father relocated the family to San Francisco I will be reading move about this policy as well as readingof the biographies written by Rappaport.As evidenced in this biography, ...

  8. Joan Anderson says:

    Excellent picture book biography of the Cherokee leader Wilma had a hard life after being moved out of Cherokee territory and into the slums of San Francisco but she moved back as an adult with 2 daughters She also faced poor health after a car accident An important look ...

  9. Jen says:

    Wilma and Charlie believed that the Cherokee people of Bell knew best what they needed to do to better their lives For a year they met with them and listened to them map out what they should do first.

  10. Shawn Thrasher says:

    Some kid is going to love this book I personally neither liked or disliked it Wilma Mankiller s story is inspirational, very Obama esque The world always needs children s books that tell stories true or not about diverse experiences.

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