Major Barbara

Major Barbara[Ebook] ➦ Major Barbara By George Bernard Shaw – Heartforum.co.uk When a Salvation Army officer learns that her father, a wealthy armaments manufacturer, has donated lots of money to her organization, she resigns in disgust but eventually sees the truth of her fathe When a Salvation Army officer learns that her father, a wealthy armaments manufacturer, has donated lots of money to her organization, she resigns in disgust but eventually sees the truth of her father s reasoning that social iniquity derives from poverty it is only through accumulating wealth and power that people can help each other.

George Bernard Shaw was an Irish playwright, socialist, and a co founder of the London School of Economics Although his first profitable writing was music and literary criticism, in which capacity he wrote many highly articulate pieces of journalism, his main talent was for drama Over the course of his life he wrotethan plays Nearly all his plays address prevailing social problems, but each also includes a vein of comedy that makes their stark themespalatable In these works Shaw examined education, marriage, religion, government, health care, and class privilegeAn ardent socialist, Shaw was angered by what he perceived to be the exploitation of the working class He wrote many brochures and speeches for the Fabian Society He became an accomplished orator in the furtherance of its causes, which included gaining equal rights for men and women, alleviating abuses of the working class, rescinding private ownership of productive land, and promoting healthy lifestyles For a short time he was active in local politics, serving on the London County CouncilIn , Shaw married Charlotte Payne Townshend, a fellow Fabian, whom he survived They settled in Ayot St Lawrence in a house now called Shaw s Corner He is the only person to have been awarded both a Nobel Prize for Literature and an Oscar The former for his contributions to literature and the latter for his work on the film Pygmalion adaptation of his play of the same name Shaw wanted to refuse his Nobel Prize outright, as he had no desire for public honours, but he accepted it at his wife s behest She considered it a tribute to Ireland He did reject the monetary award, requesting it be used to finance translation of Swedish books to EnglishShaw died at Shaw s Corner, aged , from chronic health problems exacerbated by injuries incurred by falling.

Paperback  ì Major Barbara MOBI Ä
  • Paperback
  • 98 pages
  • Major Barbara
  • George Bernard Shaw
  • English
  • 01 December 2019
  • 140695716X

10 thoughts on “Major Barbara

  1. Laura Verret says:

    7 4 19 edit Haha, sooooo. apparently this is the most popular review I ve posted here on Goodreads I m leaving it up because a handful of people seemed to have enjoyed it, but let s just say, well, eight years have passed, and I now find my own analysis of this play and its author lacking understatement is a literary virtue, right Still kinda proud of myself for rhyming God with facade , though, like that was actually almost inspired right there A Marxist play.Whatcan I s 7 4 19 edit Haha, sooooo. apparently this is the most popular review I ve posted here on Goodreads I m leaving it up because a handful of people seemed to have enjoyed it, but let s just say, well, eight years have passed, and I now find my own analysis of this play and its author lacking understatement is a literary virtue, right Still kinda proud of myself for rhyming God with facade , though, like that was actually almost inspired right there A Marxist play.Whatcan I say Shaw s one of a kind, And he had a great mind, But he used it to sayThat he d found a way To live without truth He believed it, forsooth He fought against God,And built his facadeBy claiming that reasonWas funding his treason.He poked at all moralsAnd fueled all his quarrels With words smooth as honey In short, he was funny It s not hard to mockOr even to shock,But for all his jeeringHis methods are queering,For Shaw fails to showWhy his strange credoIs anyvalidThan potato salad Okay so that s stretching The truth just a bit But what does it matter So long as it s wit If only it s funnyAnd makes people laughWhat matter if I call A duck a giraffe It s just the old prejudiceOf people long goneTo call this a verseInstead of a stone So, this is the boneThat I pick with ShawHe tells us we re stupidAnd so is our law.He doesn t prove whyHis ways are betterAnd if we objectHe tells us we re fretters.But I think that hisAre the ways that are puerileYou dare ask me why You re just an imbecile

  2. Richard says:

    A witty but devastatingly subversive play which mocks Christianity in general and the Salvation Army in particular And as is always the case with Shaw, it comes with a long winded, preachy preface designed to hammer home the author s ideology, just in case the stupid reader did not get it from the play.

  3. Alan says:

    A brilliant summation of the place of capital in war mongering and peace striving The Salvation Army proposes peace, but in order to keep the charity going to support peace, Major Barbara elicits contributions from her father Undershaft the munitions maker In Eisenhower s term, Undershaft is the perfect representative of the military industrial complex Peace itself depends upon Undershaft Read as a college freshman, struck with Shaw s insight and character portrayal My Freshman Humanities p A brilliant summation of the place of capital in war mongering and peace striving The Salvation Army proposes peace, but in order to keep the charity going to support peace, Major Barbara elicits contributions from her father Undershaft the munitions maker In Eisenhower s term, Undershaft is the perfect representative of the military industrial complex Peace itself depends upon Undershaft Read as a college freshman, struck with Shaw s insight and character portrayal My Freshman Humanities professor was Rolfe Humphries, the great translator and fine poet evidently displaced from the top by Roethke, who wrote maybe 7 good poems like Plath

  4. Manny says:

    I last read this play as a teenager, and I don t remember it as well as I would ideally wish I recall the moral as being, roughly, that the Christian world view was entirely compatible with the ethos of the military industrial complex Can that really be right Maybe there was some level of irony I wasn t properly getting I should re read it But, ironic or not, full marks to Shaw for prescience the term military industrial complex wouldn t even be invented for another few decades, and I do I last read this play as a teenager, and I don t remember it as well as I would ideally wish I recall the moral as being, roughly, that the Christian world view was entirely compatible with the ethos of the military industrial complex Can that really be right Maybe there was some level of irony I wasn t properly getting I should re read it But, ironic or not, full marks to Shaw for prescience the term military industrial complex wouldn t even be invented for another few decades, and I don t think many other people were linking it with Christianity at that point in history.Another odd thing about the play is that the most brilliant and memorable passage isn t by Shaw at all It s a couple of verses from Euripides, translated by his friend Gilbert Murray, which one of the characters quotes about halfway through Act II Since they aren t as well known as they deserve to be, I ll reproduce them here One and anotherIn money and guns may outpass his brother And men in their millions float and flowAnd seethe with a million hopes as leaven And they win their will or they miss their will And their hopes are dead or are pined for still But who er can knowAs the long days goThat to live is happy, has found his heaven.Is it so hard a thing to seeThat the spirit of God whate er it be The law that abides and changes not, ages long,The Eternal and Nature born these things be strong What else is Wisdom What of Man s endeavor,Or God s high grace so lovely and so great To stand from fear set free To breathe and wait To hold a hand uplifted over Fate And shall not Loveliness be loved for ever

  5. Laura says:

    From BBC Radio 4 DramaAfter a long absence George Bernard Shaw returns to the Radio 4 airwaves in this new 2 part drama Starring Eleanor Tomlinson as Barbara and Rebecca Front as Lady Britomart 1 2 Barbara s mission is to save East End souls in the West Ham Salvation shelter A tale of rich privilege and a battle of wills All wrapped up in a romance, the return of a long lost father and a little matter of finding a foundling to carry on the Undershaftarms and gunpowder empire.2 2 While Ba From BBC Radio 4 DramaAfter a long absence George Bernard Shaw returns to the Radio 4 airwaves in this new 2 part drama Starring Eleanor Tomlinson as Barbara and Rebecca Front as Lady Britomart 1 2 Barbara s mission is to save East End souls in the West Ham Salvation shelter A tale of rich privilege and a battle of wills All wrapped up in a romance, the return of a long lost father and a little matter of finding a foundling to carry on the Undershaftarms and gunpowder empire.2 2 While Barbara is out in the East End trying tosave souls and raise money for the Salvation Army,Undershaft tells Dolly the two things necessary for Salvation are money and gunpowderand once he s got the Army he ll have Barbara too.Is he, as Dolly suspects, an infernal old rascal Concertina played by Colin Guthrie and the Cornet by Peter RingroseProduced and Directed by Tracey NealeMajor Barbara, written in 1905, is funny, enjoyable and crafty in dividing opinion and it leaves you pondering whether anything has changed over the years It cleverly splits into two episodes for this Radio 4 production.At its heart a simple and intriguing conflict the struggle between arms manufacturer Andrew Undershaft and his Salvationist daughter Barbara Can a father win his daughter s heart and mind All the best things about George Bernard Shaw are here the humour, the teasing paradoxical thinking and the sense of life being both absurd and deadly serious How should people be ruled and how should they be helped And who is really pulling the strings in the struggle for power politicians or money http www.bbc.co.uk programmes b07dk01s

  6. Shriya says:

    First of all, I d like to mention that Major Barbara just like the female protagonist of the play, saved my soul not through the salvation army but by being the first book I had read in almost a fortnight The depression that had followed was unbearable and Major Barbara literally pulled me out of it today, when I started reading it again Now about the play You read a lot of plays Some are tragic, some are comic and some are simply Shavian You go about the world, with your own notion First of all, I d like to mention that Major Barbara just like the female protagonist of the play, saved my soul not through the salvation army but by being the first book I had read in almost a fortnight The depression that had followed was unbearable and Major Barbara literally pulled me out of it today, when I started reading it again Now about the play You read a lot of plays Some are tragic, some are comic and some are simply Shavian You go about the world, with your own notions and then along comes Shaw and turns your world upside down When you readMajor Barbara, for some time you are a little confused with Shaw s ideology and you begin to wonder whetherpoverty really is the biggest sin and whether man s real aim is to avoid being poor Is pity really the scavenger of misery And charity a rich man s excuse to compensate for those who are sacrificed for their sake This play,than any other Shavian play makes you thin Sometimes, it makes no sense and sometimes, you just can t tell whether your thinking has been wrong all these years or whether Shaw smoke something weird before he conceivedMajor Barbara With this play, than any other and through Undershaft, Shaw reverses your concept of good and bad, moral and immoral

  7. Laura says:

    The problem with Shaw is that I always feel crabbier when I read him Even Pygmalion, which strikes me as a superior play, makes me slightly irritable, and Major Barbara doesn t have any musical tunes to hum while you re trudging through Shaw s dreary I Am So Keenly Critical and Nuanced dialogue The other problem is that, in my opinion, he s neither keen nor nuanced He s bigoted and cranky, and his weak humor begs an unfavorable comparison to Oscar Wilde, who probably didn t like this play eit The problem with Shaw is that I always feel crabbier when I read him Even Pygmalion, which strikes me as a superior play, makes me slightly irritable, and Major Barbara doesn t have any musical tunes to hum while you re trudging through Shaw s dreary I Am So Keenly Critical and Nuanced dialogue The other problem is that, in my opinion, he s neither keen nor nuanced He s bigoted and cranky, and his weak humor begs an unfavorable comparison to Oscar Wilde, who probably didn t like this play either I know Shaw brings up interesting questions about individual and corporate responsibility toward those who purchase goods, and he explores the question impossibility of a utopia These are good issues, and not easily resolved in or out of the play But Shaw s antagonism toward religion and his disgust for human beings in general are so off putting that I want to toss the book at his feet Too bad someone didn t tell him that misanthropy gets tiresome In retrospect, possibly what pushed me over the edge wasn t actually Shaw s play, but having to listen to self righteous classmates discuss it It s awful that the Salvation Army hands out bread and soup instead of providing job training Yes, in fact it s EVIL when you think about it No, it s not Isn t it bad enough to have to read about ridiculous characters Must I also have to listen to ridiculous comments from actual people

  8. وائل المنعم says:

    After reading so many plays by Shaw, I liked only this play, In it i like Shaw the satiric but not necessarily Shaw the intellectual, although i preference socialism, but have an unrest about the the western Europeans and Americans Socialists specially the celebrity ones.Back to the play, I think the most remarkable element about it is its characters, Shaw s sarcasm of every one except maybe Undershaft is clear at least for me In this screen version he is free to present the scenes as After reading so many plays by Shaw, I liked only this play, In it i like Shaw the satiric but not necessarily Shaw the intellectual, although i preference socialism, but have an unrest about the the western Europeans and Americans Socialists specially the celebrity ones.Back to the play, I think the most remarkable element about it is its characters, Shaw s sarcasm of every one except maybe Undershaft is clear at least for me In this screen version he is free to present the scenes as he liked and so the dialogue don t hold alone the burden of clarify the idea, And this maybe the cause of the weakness of the play the unnecessarily and repeated ideas presented in characters dialogues when it s very clear by the events itself

  9. Rajesh Budhathoki says:

    Shaw s notion of poverty is a crime and poor people must put to death is a radical idea I am not convinced All characters get wallowed in the money that Andrew Undershaft throws upon them Major Barbara agrees to save well fed souls which connotes a new doctrine of religion.

  10. Leslie says:

    Read as part of my Kindle omnibus The Plays of Shaw.Very witty satire about Barbara Undershaft, a major in the Salvation Army, and her family, most notably her father who owns operates a munitions factory The debate about physical versus moral power is a bit wordy in places otherwise I might have given this a 5 star rating Now I am off to watch the film version with Rex Harrison and Wendy Hiller Read as part of my Kindle omnibus The Plays of Shaw.Very witty satire about Barbara Undershaft, a major in the Salvation Army, and her family, most notably her father who owns operates a munitions factory The debate about physical versus moral power is a bit wordy in places otherwise I might have given this a 5 star rating Now I am off to watch the film version with Rex Harrison and Wendy Hiller

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