I'm Still Here: Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness

I'm Still Here: Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness➶ [Read] ➲ I'm Still Here: Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness By Austin Channing Brown ➾ – Heartforum.co.uk From a powerful new voice on racial justice, an eye opening account of growing up Black, Christian, and female in middle class white America Austin Channing Brown s first encounter with a racialized A From a powerful new voice on racial justice, Here: Black MOBI ò an eye opening account of growing up Black, Christian, and female in middle class white America Austin Channing Brown s first encounter with a racialized America came at age , when she discovered her parents named her Austin to deceive future employers into thinking she was a white man Growing up in majority white schools, organizations, and churches, Austin writes, I had to learn what it means to love blackness, a journey that led to a lifetime spent navigating America s racial divide I'm Still Kindle - as a writer, speaker and expert who helps organizations practice genuine inclusionIn a time when nearly all institutions schools, churches, universities, businesses claim to value diversity in their mission statements, I m Still Here is a powerful account of how and why our actions so often fall short of our words Austin writes in breathtaking detail about her journey to self worth and the pitfalls that kill our attempts at racial justice, in stories that bear witness to the complexity of America s social fabric from Black Cleveland neighborhoods to private schools Still Here: Black PDF Ç in the middle class suburbs, from prison walls to the boardrooms at majority white organizationsFor readers who have engaged with America s legacy on race through the writing of Ta Nehisi Coates and Michael Eric Dyson, I m Still Here is an illuminating look at how white, middle class, Evangelicalism has participated in an era of rising racial hostility, inviting the reader to confront apathy, recognize God s ongoing work in the world, and discover how blackness if we let it can save us all.

Austin Channing Brown is a media producer, author, Here: Black MOBI ò and speaker providing inspired leadership on racial justice in America She is the New York Times and USA Today Bestselling author of I m Still Here Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness and the Executive Producer of The Next Question A Web Series Imagining How Expansive Racial Justice Can Be Her workshops are incisive, fun, disarming, and transformative By using an intentional mix of humor, pop culture, story telling, and audience engagement, she awakens people to the current realities of systemic I'm Still Kindle - racism and the everyday actions which make it possible Whether she is being interviewed, lecturing, preaching or leading a workshop, Austin is sure to evoke thought, feeling and action as she celebrates Blackness and the possibility of justice in our organizations, teams and communities.

I'm Still Here: Black Dignity in a World Made for
  • Hardcover
  • 185 pages
  • I'm Still Here: Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness
  • Austin Channing Brown
  • English
  • 10 October 2019
  • 1524760854

10 thoughts on “I'm Still Here: Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness

  1. Shayla Mays says:

    In the same way that not everyone was ready and could handle, Between the World and Me, this is another that some will have a hard time with It was not meant to comfort white people It s written to share a black experience With that being said, if there is one book that could most accurately define my Christian black womanhood my thoughts, my pain, my fear, my concerns, my frustrations, my awareness that I MUST press on despite not having much to cling to for hope it s this book I read In the same way that not everyone was ready and could handle, Between the World and Me, this is another that some will have a hard time with It was not meant to comfort white people It s written to share a black experience With that being said, if there is one book that could most accurately define my Christian black womanhood my thoughts, my pain, my fear, my concerns, my frustrations, my awareness that I MUST press on despite not having much to cling to for hope it s this book I read it in one sitting It was that relatable So grateful for Austin s willingness to share her perspective and a part of her story which so many of us black women can Amen to

  2. Tiffany says:

    Update on the second read through Turns out I gave that first copy away to my student, a senior black student, my advisee, who s so done for good reason with the institution where I work an institution like many of the institutions Brown works for I bought another copy to teach from this week in a Theology and Literature of the Black Body Finished this book today Handed it to my white kids as soon as I closed the cover Listen, I said.

  3. Rincey says:

    Yeah, I m going to need my own copy of this book so I can re read it and mark it up So many good truths in here.Watch me discuss this book in my July wrap up Yeah, I m going to need my own copy of this book so I can re read it and mark it up So many good truths in here.Watch me discuss this book in my July wrap up

  4. Cristina Monica says:

    The best time for me to read a memoir is after finishing a fantasy novel in this case The Wicked King because while fiction and non fiction do share similarities at least they should , plunging into something very different makes you evenaware of what you re reading currently.This is the kind of memoir I like reading I recently learned that the word memoir can apply to both an exploration of someone s life, like a biography, or writing on a specific topic, like an essay Although The best time for me to read a memoir is after finishing a fantasy novel in this case The Wicked King because while fiction and non fiction do share similarities at least they should , plunging into something very different makes you evenaware of what you re reading currently.This is the kind of memoir I like reading I recently learned that the word memoir can apply to both an exploration of someone s life, like a biography, or writing on a specific topic, like an essay Although I don t exclusively read memoirs that fit the first definition, I do prefer it It s then no surprise that I was immediately captivated by this book It s not only that the author talks about her early life childhood, adolescence and coming of age in general all of which I adore reading about, it s that she uses her communication skills to share her views and explore her past and present in such an honest and relatable way She denounces racism and questions today s society s view of Blackness and Whiteness using examples easy to understand and comparisons that immediately put things in perspective One metaphor she used that especially spoke to me was how the world is so much like vanilla ice cream white with only a few chocolate sprinkles on the top, but that this is not how it should be, because although the sprinkles add flavour, they are dispensable And Blackness should not be replaceable It is here to stay.It also never crossed my mind that some companies may hire people of color and of other ethnicities simply to take pride in their own inclusivity, while not necessarily wanting to hear any of those people s ideas or welcome their culture with them Many assume they will assimilate Some are even baffled by their new black employees who refuse to assimilate, choosing to keep their individualities.I have read non fiction books that discuss discrimination and race relations in the past, but the truth is that I will never stop learning Even if I was aware of some of the things mentioned in this memoir, I still ended up learning a lot That s because we never do stop learning Nor should we ever want to Blog Youtube Twitter Instagram Google Bloglovin

  5. Leigh Kramer says:

    If you re at all familiar with Austin Channing Brown, you know she is a gifted communicator as both a writer and speaker I had high hopes for her first book and I was hooked from the first page I had intended to only read the first few chapters and before I knew it, I chucked my plans for the day and wrapped myself up in the pages of Austin s story.By the time I finished reading, I was evenin awe of Austin I m Still Here is truly phenomenal.Austin shares how even her very name challenge If you re at all familiar with Austin Channing Brown, you know she is a gifted communicator as both a writer and speaker I had high hopes for her first book and I was hooked from the first page I had intended to only read the first few chapters and before I knew it, I chucked my plans for the day and wrapped myself up in the pages of Austin s story.By the time I finished reading, I was evenin awe of Austin I m Still Here is truly phenomenal.Austin shares how even her very name challenges people s assumptions People expect to a white man when they see the name Austin they don t always know what to do with the Black woman before them She grew up and has worked in majority white schools, organizations, and churches And with those majority white spaces come stereotypes, biases, and prejudices.Austin shares her trajectory from believing she was the white culture whisperer after college to seeing how white supremacy infected programs supposedly dedicated to racial reconciliation The role of the bridge builder sounds appealing until it becomes clear how often the bridge is your broken back p 42In chapter 5, titled Whiteness At Work, Austin details the microaggressions she experienced in her average workday at a Christian organization It was staggering to see them listed out and know this was just an average day One of many And then to see how the organization had no interest in changing when Austin pointed out the biases present, despite its supposed commitment to diversity in the workplace It is little wonder why Austin finds white people so exhausting I can only imagine the bone deep tiredness that comes after a lifetime of existing as a Black woman in primarily white spaces White readers will need to pay special attention to the sections exploring the difference between white fragility and taking full ownership of facing your own racism If you are white, you have internalized racism, even if you don t see it This is what it is to live in a society stacked in your favor from the moment you are born and this is why it s important for us to confront our privilege and interrogate our biases.More importantly, we cannot we must not rely on People Of Color to help us do that As Austin notes, she is not the priest for the white soul p 65 I was very moved by Interlude Letter To My Son I was also moved when Austin shared about her fears that crop up whenever her husband or dad travels She worries they ll be pulled over and won t make it home It s horrifying that this is not an unrealistic fear, that there s nothing we can say in reassurance It s a profound reminder of why we need to keep fighting for justice and the eradication of white supremacy at every level There are tough truths here but there is also joy as Austin reflects on the gifts the Black church has given her and what she loves about being a Black woman I loved reading about her memories of her childhood and time with her family, as well as her love for books and the library.Each chapter builds upon the one before it in a way that is masterful This mastery becomes especially clear in the final two chapters The last chapter is a reflection on hope and hopelessness and it is precisely what I needed to read for so many reasons This is the shadow of hope Knowing that we may never see the realization of our dreams, and yet still showing up p 105Then I read the final paragraph and Austin brought it all home and my only thought was, holy shit It was that powerful I read it again and then again and let her words sink in The whole book builds toward that moment and it is absolutely incredible getting there Highly recommended.Disclosure I was provided a review copy from Convergent in exchange for an honest review

  6. Raven says:

    I read this book with the hope that Ms Brown would illuminate what actual justice or equality would look like It was largely a memoir and a good one I went school in the 70s and 80s so my experience was different but I was surprised to hear about hers as I had assumed things had changed somewhat since I had been in school She seemed put off by the fact that the predominantly white school she attended taught and treated her through the lens of whiteness , but I am not sure how they could have I read this book with the hope that Ms Brown would illuminate what actual justice or equality would look like It was largely a memoir and a good one I went school in the 70s and 80s so my experience was different but I was surprised to hear about hers as I had assumed things had changed somewhat since I had been in school She seemed put off by the fact that the predominantly white school she attended taught and treated her through the lens of whiteness , but I am not sure how they could have done any different seeing as how her classmates and teachers were white I see that as a frame of reference problem if I am not black or French or Chinese how can I treat you culturally the way your people would not so much as a discrimination issue I would not expect a predominantly black congregation to start conforming to my cultural white requirements or needs so I am not sure why the expectation is there in the reverse setting Again, how would we know what is the right thing to do I was steadfastly behind her with regards to her outrage at being touched without permission, called names, assumed to be a welfare recipient instead of an employee, and being yelled at by anyone for having different views Everyone s personal experience is valid afterall it is theirs However, I don t think the answer is to be racist against whites Many whites would like to know what it is that is wanted from us in this racial justice regard and this book did not have any real answers I have the impression that nothing I did or said as a white woman were I to meet Ms Brown would be the correct response She herself indicated in several places in the book that she knew what white people were thinking when they met her or talked with her This is extremely judgmental and if it were to be said about black people would be considered racist without question If we are hurt by this prejudgement we are considered fragile So, basically, it is not okay for white people to express their feelings with regards to this topic, but it is fine for black people to do so The bottom line is people are ALL different We were all raised in different home situations, cultures, neighborhoods, etc I don t believe it is really possible to reconcile an entire people group to another one Even Jesus worked on an individual basis and sent his disciples out to also work on an individual basis

  7. Raymond says:

    This book is my story about growing up in a Black girl s body. I am not a priest for the white soul. Our only chance at dismantling racial injustice is beingcurious about its origins than we are worried about our comfort. This is a powerful book Many of Brown s experiences being black in a white world have echoed my own However, they arevisceral because she lives with the double bind of being a black female Her book is part memoir and also has elements of James Baldwin and Ta N This book is my story about growing up in a Black girl s body. I am not a priest for the white soul. Our only chance at dismantling racial injustice is beingcurious about its origins than we are worried about our comfort. This is a powerful book Many of Brown s experiences being black in a white world have echoed my own However, they arevisceral because she lives with the double bind of being a black female Her book is part memoir and also has elements of James Baldwin and Ta Nehisi Coates Her voice is unique because she focuses alot on her interaction with white Christians, especially those who purport to be nice and not racist Chapter 8 The Story We Tell and Chapter 14 Standing in the Shadow of Hope are my favorite chapters in the book Brown has a way with words, this is clear in Chapter 14 when she writes about her relationship with hope

  8. Chanequa Walker-Barnes says:

    Absolutely breathtaking Just a few pages into this book, I knew that I had to finish it in one day Austin Channing Brown does what many of us have been needing for so long she centers her Black womanhood in her memoir of racial justice, reconciliation, and Christianity By doing so, she demonstrates what womanist theologians have consistently claimed when you begin with the experiences and needs of Black women, you articulate a theology that encompasses all This is a memoir, to be sure, but Absolutely breathtaking Just a few pages into this book, I knew that I had to finish it in one day Austin Channing Brown does what many of us have been needing for so long she centers her Black womanhood in her memoir of racial justice, reconciliation, and Christianity By doing so, she demonstrates what womanist theologians have consistently claimed when you begin with the experiences and needs of Black women, you articulate a theology that encompasses all This is a memoir, to be sure, but it is every bit a work of theology, in which Brown makes bold claims about who God is and who God intends for us to be to one another

  9. April says:

    This is a fantastic book and a must read for anyone who identifies with any of the following is white is a person of color is Christian does anti racist work wants to do anti racist work anyone and everyoneI identified with so many of her experiences It was just empowering to read stories that spoke directly to my own experiences and to have this book to point to as a reference point for white friends allies acquaintances looking to me to explain things to them.

  10. Brandice says:

    I m Still Here Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness is Austin Channing Brown s story of growing up in a predominately white world She talks about her childhood and church, her family, her experiences in college and the work world, and throughout all of this, embracing being Black Austin is spot on in her discussion of many workplaces I rolled my eyes multiple times in frustration on her behalf as she recounted comments and challenges from coworkers, even those alleging they meant no h I m Still Here Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness is Austin Channing Brown s story of growing up in a predominately white world She talks about her childhood and church, her family, her experiences in college and the work world, and throughout all of this, embracing being Black Austin is spot on in her discussion of many workplaces I rolled my eyes multiple times in frustration on her behalf as she recounted comments and challenges from coworkers, even those alleging they meant no harm An overhaul of workplace culture is necessary, particularly in the corporate world Too often companies issue distant, jargon laden statements, hosting a round table discussion once or twice, claiming they offer an inclusive environment and have zero tolerance for racist behavior comments, then continuously move on until the next instance of tragedy that they become aware of White people should be speaking less and listening , at work and elsewhere, everywhere.I listened to the audiobook, narrated by Austin herself, which I highly recommend While short in length, I listened to it in small parts over the last week, taking in each piece of her story I m Still Here highlights several ongoing issues in our society and serves as a timely reminder we have much to learn Change doesn t happen by hoping, it happens through action

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *