Autumn

Autumn[PDF] ⚣ Autumn ✯ Ali Smith – Heartforum.co.uk Daniel is a century old Elisabeth, born in , has her eye on the future The United Kingdom is in pieces, divided by a historic once in a generation summerLove is won, love is lost Hope is hand in hand Daniel is a century old Elisabeth, born in , has her eye on the future The United Kingdom is in pieces, divided by a historic once in a generation summerLove is won, love is lost Hope is hand in hand with hopelessness The seasons roll round, as ever.

Ali Smith is a writer, born in Inverness, Scotland, to working class parents She was raised in a council house in Inverness and now lives in Cambridge She studied at Aberdeen, and then at Cambridge, for a PhD that was never finished In a interview with writing magazine Mslexia, she talked briefly about the difficulty of becoming ill with chronic fatigue syndrome for a year and how it forced her to give up her job as a lecturer at University of Strathclyde to focus on what she really wanted to do writing She has been with her partner Sarah Wood for years and dedicates all her books to her.

Autumn PDF/EPUB Ä Hardcover
    Autumn PDF/EPUB Ä Hardcover in hand with hopelessness The seasons roll round, as ever."/>
  • Hardcover
  • 264 pages
  • Autumn
  • Ali Smith
  • English
  • 14 January 2019
  • 0241207002

10 thoughts on “Autumn

  1. Adina says:

    I don t know I don t know what to write about Autumn I don t even know what I ve read What was I supposed to get from this book, what was the purpose Was it a Brexit novel I don t think so It does talk some about Brexit But it also talks about a strange friendship between a little girl presently grown up and an old man Odd conversations those two had And about a dubious Pop Artist There were also a few weird, moderately fun, post office conversations There were some interesting part I don t know I don t know what to write about Autumn I don t even know what I ve read What was I supposed to get from this book, what was the purpose Was it a Brexit novel I don t think so It does talk some about Brexit But it also talks about a strange friendship between a little girl presently grown up and an old man Odd conversations those two had And about a dubious Pop Artist There were also a few weird, moderately fun, post office conversations There were some interesting parts and some parts that I could not get, no matter how much I was frowning at the page There were jumps from one time line to another There were dreams, death dreams There were quotations from books There were other stuff that I did not care for or had any idea what they meant Something about a sexual scandal As you can see, I cannot write a coherent review because I did not think the book was coherent either I get it, I appreciate the originality and all That s why I m giving it 3 stars There were good parts, I even smiled once or twice but I cannot say I enjoyed the experience Most likely, I am not the right person to read Ali Smith Sorry I cannot do better To make up for it will post the visual opinion of my cat on this novel I have the impression she enjoyed itthan I did She thinks it tasted delicious I know, I know Cat pictures for a serious book shortlisted to the Booker Prize I don t care The author spent half the book writing about some strange collages of a Pop Art painter with all the details included, so I can do whatever I want with my review It is another form of art, isn t itI ve probably gone mad

  2. Ilse says:

    This is EnglandAutumn is to be the first instalment of a seasonal quartet that Ali Smith plans to write a cycle exploring the subjective experience of time, questioning the nature of time itself Triggered to read it by the title autumn is my favourite season this first instalment was a wondrous introduction to Smith s prose for me, so I eagerly look forward to the next parts now.Autumn is a playful, multi layered and at times delectably subversive novel on the floating of time, aging, This is EnglandAutumn is to be the first instalment of a seasonal quartet that Ali Smith plans to write a cycle exploring the subjective experience of time, questioning the nature of time itself Triggered to read it by the title autumn is my favourite season this first instalment was a wondrous introduction to Smith s prose for me, so I eagerly look forward to the next parts now.Autumn is a playful, multi layered and at times delectably subversive novel on the floating of time, aging, identity, art, love and friendship, grounded knee deep in the grim realities of today s post truth politics, against the backdrop of the aftermath of the Brexit vote Set right here, right now, the story time travels back and forth between the past and the present Since primary school, Elisabeth, now 32 and an art history lecturer, and her next door neighbour, Daniel Gluck, about 70 years her senior, are close friends Both soulmates are bruised Elisabeth is fatherless and Daniel is alone From flashbacks and dreams, we learn from their childhood and past While Daniel a collector of arty art has awakened Elisabeth s sensibility to art and honed her skills of critical thinking, encouraging her to be a girl reading the world , Elisabeth now spends hours next to his bed while he dozes off in a care home, reading Shakespeare and Huxley to him What you reading Always be reading something, he said Even when we re not physically reading How else will we read the world Think of it as a constant. Smith parallels two key moments in recent history and present day UK by connecting them both to dishonesties in politics, suggesting these lies had critical impact on society, the Brexit vote and the Profumo Scandal of 1963 She astutely smuggles the latter into the novel by interlacing the scandal and the life of her main characters, Daniel and Elisabeth, with the vibrant and tragically short life of Pauline Boty 1938 1966 , the only female representative artist in British Pop Art, whose legacy is continuously oscillating between oblivion and rediscovery Pauline Boty used a shot of the famous chair photograph series by Lewis Morley of the women at the heart of the Profumo scandal, Christine Keeler, in a collage painting which has been mysteriously missing soon after she had painted it, Scandal 63 To say the least, these lies make people sick She hadn t known that proximity to lies, even just reading about them, could make you feel so ill By showing the effect of lies by the powerful on society, how they divide people and infuriate them, Smith makes one ponder on the significance of truth Is there really anything new under the sun in this acrimonious year of the prevalence of post truth politics Or it is just an illustration of the unchangeable nature of power and the corroded order of things By reviving feminist artist Pauline Boty, Smith thematises the position of women in modern art Some titles of Boty s paintings, like It s a man s world speak volumes in that respect Smith s Boty proclaims I am a person I m an intelligent nakedness An intellectual body I m a bodily intelligence Art s full of nudes and I m a thinking, choosing nude I m the artist as nude I m the nude as artist. This assertion reminded me of the mission statement of the Guerrilla Girls, a feminist group denouncing discrimination, tracking and keeping statistics on the representation of female artists in museums Art still is a man s world, to a very high extent However obvious Smith s sympathies in the debate, do not expect pure doom and gloom Instead of wallowing in woeful defeatism, the characters shine in heart warming and infectious combativeness and witty insurgence The Kafkaesque scenes at the post office resemble absurdist sketches, while they are at the same time a virulent critique on the ridiculously bureaucratic demands regulation imposes on people and on a society that turns a blind eye to the homeless which have to shelter in public buildings, without anyone blinking.The energetic pace of the writing, brimming with jocular wordplay, literary references and puns smoothly coincides with the melancholic undercurrent of this novel, as Autumn breathes an atmosphere of transience People die, at young age Everything is temporary, like the leaves falling in autumn Entering history equals finding endless sad fragility Elisabeth had last come to the field just after the circus had left, especially to look at the flat dry place where the circus had had its tent She liked doing melancholy things like that But now you couldn t tell that any of these summer things had ever happened There was just an empty field The sports tracks had faded and gone The flattened grass, the places that had turned to mud where the crowds had wandered round between the rides and the open sided trucks of the driving and shooting games, the ghost circus ring nothing but grassIl faut reculer pour mieux sauter Perhaps one could say that Ali Smith in a way indulges in facile preaching to the choir, mollycoddling the right minded citizens mourning the present state of the world But why not just delight in her eloquently phrased discourse and lithe sentences, nodding approvingly while licking one s wounds instead of sinking into despair Fite dem Back I thank NetGalley, Penguin and Ali Smith for granting me an ARC

  3. Fionnuala says:

    What are you reading A tale of two people.Tell me about it.It s a book full of leaves, green ones and brown ones And white ones too, of course.Ha But seriously, describe it to me.It s a book with a hole in the middle.Now you re just being absurd.No, wait There s really as much absence as presence in this book.Tell me what s in it not what s not in it.It s a book of fragments that fit together in odd arrangements Give me an example of the way the fragments fit together.There s a sister who What are you reading A tale of two people.Tell me about it.It s a book full of leaves, green ones and brown ones And white ones too, of course.Ha But seriously, describe it to me.It s a book with a hole in the middle.Now you re just being absurd.No, wait There s really as much absence as presence in this book.Tell me what s in it not what s not in it.It s a book of fragments that fit together in odd arrangements Give me an example of the way the fragments fit together.There s a sister who doesn t exist and a sister who no longer exists.Not bad Give me another fragment There are people who use the word Home when they really mean Away, as in Go.Oh, right Brexit There are lies about lying about lies about lying.Please give me something that s not about politicians.There s a time that s really a place.Give me something less abstract.A giant soldier squashes a woman with his boot.Argh Don t tell me anyabout this book.Would it be ok if it wasn t a giant soldier but just a man, and he squashed a mouse not a person No Definitely not Maybe you could tell me what isn t in the book instead of giving me such freaky fragments Why are you holding your breath like that Because the unsaid in this book lies in the gaps between breaths.Normal people don t have gaps in their breathing.A person who is breathing his last might if he had enough luck to die leisurely.So what do those gaps tell about The black hole in twentieth century history.Just say the Holocaust.Did you know holo means whole and caust means destroyed by fire So So the entire word means an absence in a presence, the hole in whole.Wait a minute Is that interpretation of the term Holocaust in the book Well, no But you can read it between the leaves For further episodes of this conversation see Winter and Spring

  4. Barry Pierce says:

    2020 update this is still amazing.Hailed as the first post Brexit novel, inAutumnAli Smith proves to us all that she is probably the greatest writer currently working in the United Kingdom The fact that this novel was published a mere four months after the disastrous Brexit vote but yet analyses its aftermath as a central theme shows a turnaround that is nearly insane Smith must have practically vomited this novel into her word processor, which makes its utter flawlessness almost divine 2020 update this is still amazing.Hailed as the first post Brexit novel, inAutumnAli Smith proves to us all that she is probably the greatest writer currently working in the United Kingdom The fact that this novel was published a mere four months after the disastrous Brexit vote but yet analyses its aftermath as a central theme shows a turnaround that is nearly insane Smith must have practically vomited this novel into her word processor, which makes its utter flawlessness almost divine The novel begins with a man, Daniel Gluck, who seems to have washed up on a beach Believing he has died he casts his eye along the beach and sees evenlike him The corpses of refugees line the beach, interspersed between lounging sunbathers and laughing children who seem to take no notice of the corpses around them This opening scene demonstrates Smith s intent with Autumn, she is writing a Zeitgeist novel Luckily for Daniel, this scene is all a dream, as he is in a coma Most days, in the chair beside him is a woman who the nurses believe is his granddaughter She is no relation She is Elisabeth with an S Demand from the French, Du Monde She is the tentpole upon which this novel drapes Autumn is a exploration of her life and of those around her But it is also a study of every person living in Great Britain post Brexit It is the story of Christine Keeler, yes THAT Christine Keeler, of Profumo fame And it is the story of Pauline Boty But I ll let you discover the wonder that she was Autumn is oftentimes hilarious, touching, informative and playful Smith is still the master of structure and form and plays around with each like a master conductor There are no flaws in this novel If I had read it when it was published Autumn would have by far been my favourite novel of the year Ali Smith can do no wrong

  5. Diane S ☔ says:

    Ali Smith is not an easy author to read and yet her words and thoughts are beautiful If you like a linear plot, you will not find it here, though it is mostly set in the period after Brexit, it goes back and forth in time To a friendship between a young girl and an elderly man, a man who had quite a past, which is slowly uncovered The thoughts expressed about Brexit are the same many are expressing here in the states after our recent election Wonderfully and adroitly expressed about the way Ali Smith is not an easy author to read and yet her words and thoughts are beautiful If you like a linear plot, you will not find it here, though it is mostly set in the period after Brexit, it goes back and forth in time To a friendship between a young girl and an elderly man, a man who had quite a past, which is slowly uncovered The thoughts expressed about Brexit are the same many are expressing here in the states after our recent election Wonderfully and adroitly expressed about the way many of us feel She loves to play with words, play with scenes, this is sometimes challenging but if you just read, not expecting her to follow the supposed rules of fiction, these things are often delightful She explores time, it s passing, autumn into winter, past into present, young into old, as the seasons change so do we She throws in a pop artist, the Christine Keeler scandal, which I had to look up not being from Britain Her description of the natural world absolutely gorgeous As I was reading at times I was frustrated, wondering where could she possibly be going with this Why does she throw this in Yet, at books end I find myself thinking of what she wrote, wishing I understood , but finding it nonetheless undeniably imprinted in my mind May have to reread at a later point.ARC from publisher

  6. Violet wells says:

    I was struggling with this initially Ali Smith s prose style reminds me of someone dressed in a dressing gown and slippers, hair unbrushed, wandering about a house with barely a grain of self consciousness In stark contrast to lots of writers who spend hours in front the mirror, layering on embellishment after embellishment, before they take a step onto the page Smith can give the impression of voicing aloud her thoughts the moment she has them No artificial colouring or sweetening additives I was struggling with this initially Ali Smith s prose style reminds me of someone dressed in a dressing gown and slippers, hair unbrushed, wandering about a house with barely a grain of self consciousness In stark contrast to lots of writers who spend hours in front the mirror, layering on embellishment after embellishment, before they take a step onto the page Smith can give the impression of voicing aloud her thoughts the moment she has them No artificial colouring or sweetening additives The petty mixed in with the profound This is what this book felt like for a while A woman walking about in her dressing gown and slippers making up a story as she went along, sometimes becoming distracted by trifles, sometimes making a discovery of historic importance But I should have known it sthe architecture of the novel Smith is fascinated by than wordsmithery or sentence writing and there comes a moment in this novel where everything suddenly shiningly adheres It s an exciting moment and there s no looking back afterwards It s a novel with a huge heart and an urgent though subtly interwoven warning about making rash prejudicial judgements Especially with regard to our neighbours 4.5 stars from me

  7. Hugh says:

    My fourth book from the Booker longlist, this is another that, like Reservoir 13, would have made a worthy winner At the time of its release this book was billed as the first Brexit novel, but there is so muchto it than thatupdate 19 Oct Sadly, and yet again, Ali Smith did not win, but I was very impressed by her performance and the way she encouraged Emily Fridlund and Fiona Mozley at the Nottingham shortlist readings event, which I attended last week the other three shortlisted wri My fourth book from the Booker longlist, this is another that, like Reservoir 13, would have made a worthy winner At the time of its release this book was billed as the first Brexit novel, but there is so muchto it than thatupdate 19 Oct Sadly, and yet again, Ali Smith did not win, but I was very impressed by her performance and the way she encouraged Emily Fridlund and Fiona Mozley at the Nottingham shortlist readings event, which I attended last week the other three shortlisted writers were not thereReservoir 13 is out, so this is my clear favourite book in the shortlist Smith starts by introducing two characters Daniel Gluck, who is 101 and clinging to life in a care home, and Elisabeth Demand, who was born in 1984 and knew him as a child when he was her neighbour In the first part of the book Elisabeth is confronted by various decaying public institutions and the petty jobsworths who enforce the rules the early scene in which she fights with the post office over a passport application is very funny These are mixed up with her memories of her conversations with Daniel as a child in which he encouraged her to think differently, and her visits to Daniel in the care home where he spends most of his time asleep.As in many of her other books notably Like and There but for the , Smith writes very powerfully and sympathetically about intelligent children and how they learn In this section Daniel introduces Elisabeth to the work of Pauline Boty, the other main subject of the book, by describing some of her lost paintings Daniel remembers meeting and being obsessed by Boty, and also has an immigrant backstory of his own.Boty was a leading pop artist in 60s London, who died young and was subsequently written out of history by the male critics of the time and her family s refusal to exhibit her work Her life and work is described in glowing detail, along with one of her inspirations, Christine Keeler The tone of the book changes from the disillusion and resignation Elisabeth feels when confronted with the British cultural changes that led to the Brexit vote to a form of hope embodied by Boty and her defiant flaunting of the expectations of her suburban middle class family.This is a richly rewarding novel of ideas, and as always Smith flits between her themes lightly Smith is a national treasure, and this is one of her best books This is the first of a projected four seasonally themed novels, and I look forward to the rest

  8. Hannah Greendale says:

    Click here to watch a video review of this book on my channel, From Beginning to Bookend Click here to watch a video review of this book on my channel, From Beginning to Bookend

  9. Charlotte May says:

    Ok so I didn t really get it I think I m just going to have to stay away from the Booker Nominees There always seems to be some hidden secret that everyone else knows, which gives the book 5 star reviews, while I sit here just.lost.Autumn is written in non linear prose Which is a good starting point as to why I didn t like it I can t get with that type of writing I like my stories in some kind of order, at the very least In Autumn we jump from Elisabeth as a child, hanging out w Ok so I didn t really get it I think I m just going to have to stay away from the Booker Nominees There always seems to be some hidden secret that everyone else knows, which gives the book 5 star reviews, while I sit here just.lost.Autumn is written in non linear prose Which is a good starting point as to why I didn t like it I can t get with that type of writing I like my stories in some kind of order, at the very least In Autumn we jump from Elisabeth as a child, hanging out with her 80 year old next door neighbour, Daniel to her visiting Daniel in a home when Elisabeth is suddenly an adult There are paragraphs which really resonated with me There was a focus on Brexit and how it has altered people s behaviour and attitudes toward one another, I liked that But just as soon as a section like that arrived, it would jump to some long tedious conversation between Elisabeth and the staff member in the Post Office I was just stumped.I m not sure what the point was, if there is even supposed to be one I m really happy for those who enjoyed this they clearly got something that I have missed but there we are.Onwards and upwards I guess

  10. Cheri says:

    April come she willWhen streams are ripe and swelled with rainMay she will stayResting in my arms againJune she ll change her tuneIn restless walks she ll prowl the nightApril Come She Will lyrics by Paul Simon It was the worst of times, it was the worst of times Traveling back and forth through time, the past to the present, from Elisabeth s childhood and meeting her new neighbor Daniel Gluck, to the brink of the political climate that began with Brexit, this story covers a lot of terriApril come she willWhen streams are ripe and swelled with rainMay she will stayResting in my arms againJune she ll change her tuneIn restless walks she ll prowl the nightApril Come She Will lyrics by Paul Simon It was the worst of times, it was the worst of times Traveling back and forth through time, the past to the present, from Elisabeth s childhood and meeting her new neighbor Daniel Gluck, to the brink of the political climate that began with Brexit, this story covers a lot of territory in a rather fluid way, dealing with aging, love in its many shapes and forms, friendship, art and artists, books and the telling of stories, the concept of time, music, identity, the culture of television, politics, sexual inequality, division of people, division of countries, and global warming.When first they meet, Elisabeth pretends to be her non existent twin sister, and after a bit of a chat, Daniel saysVery pleased to meet you both Finally How do you mean, finally Elisabeth said We only moved here six weeks ago The lifelong friends, he said We sometimes wait a lifetime for them And lifelong friends is exactly what they will become, the almost beginning of her life until his becomes dust in the wind, and somehow beyond then He will always be a part of her, a part of how she sees the world They play games he describes a picture, a collage, to her, as she closes her eyes and listens and her imagination follows every detail of his description, occasionally asking questions A moment, an image captured so clearly in her mind that it becomes a part of her, of how she sees art, how she sees herself, how she sees the world.Invariably, his first question when he sees her is what is she readingAlways be reading something, he said Even when we re not physically reading How else will we read the worldThe topics of politics, Brexit and beyond, flows in and out throughout this novel, although there is much to balance that out, and it is not Smith s sole focus Rather, it seems to weave in and out of the other topics, lending a time and place to this story The fleeting nature of these things that occupy of minds and hearts, that our fears take root in, the lack of comfort in knowing that they will be replaced As shall we.The elusive nature of time, how slow it seems to pass for children, for those awaiting something wonderful, how quickly it passes the older we get, how quickly a life passes The seasons, Spring, Summer, Autumn, Winter, how quickly they pass, merge one into another The seasons of life, how quickly they passWe have to hope, Daniel was saying, that the people who love us and who know us a little bit will in the end have seen us truly In the end, not much else matters July she will flyAnd give no warning to her flightAugust die she mustThe autumn winds blow chilly and coldSeptember I rememberA love once new has now grown oldApril Come She Will lyrics by Paul Simon Published 07 Feb 2017Many thanks for the ARC provided by Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group Pantheon

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