The Lost ueen of Egypt

The Lost ueen of Egypt[PDF] ❤ The Lost ueen of Egypt By Lucile Morrison – Heartforum.co.uk Soon to be back in print from Purple House PressIn the city of Akhetaten lived a princess Ankhsenpaaten later Ankhsenamon who grew up in the royal household one of six daughters of King Ahkenaten and Soon to ueen of PDF ↠ be back in print from Purple House PressIn the city of Akhetaten lived a princess Ankhsenpaaten later Ankhsenamon who grew up in the royal household one of six daughters of King Ahkenaten and ueen Nefertiti We come to know and love this girl called Small Bird by her family through the events of her colorful childhood and her marriage to Tutankhaten a boy of royal birth Her efforts The Lost Kindle - to save the kingdom from conniving priests and soldiers were gallant and dramaticWhile the fate of the ueen is unknown in her story Lucile Morrison ventures to suppose a satisfying ending to the romance An extraordinarily accurate vivid picture of domestic and court life which will enrich any study of the culture of ancient EgyptIllustrations by Franz Geritz done in the style of ancient Egypt help set the mood of Ankhsen­amon's Lost ueen of eBook ´ story as the clock is turned back than three thousand years Color frontispiece and newly recolored map end pages.

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The Lost ueen of Egypt ePUB Ð ueen of  PDF ↠
  • Hardcover
  • 367 pages
  • The Lost ueen of Egypt
  • Lucile Morrison
  • English
  • 09 December 2016
  • 9780397300440

10 thoughts on “The Lost ueen of Egypt

  1. Suzanne says:

    UPDATE BELOW Having recently finished The Egyptologist A Novel I was thinking about the book that I loved as a kid that turned me on to archaeology and ancient Egypt Didn’t remember the name of it although I read it at least 3 times when I was 10 or 12 Googled around and found some references to The Lost ueen of Egypt I think this is it and have ordered it from the library Will pick it up next week and see if this is my long lost out of print favorite book of my pre teen years This did turn out to be my favorite historical novel from childhood with my BFF Ankhesenpaaten bride of Tutankhamen as the protagonist I distinctly remembered this lovely portrait in the front of the book I couldn’t re read this all the way through as planned however because well a few decades have passed since then and my sensibilities have changed a bit I would still heartily recommend it to any 10 year old girl but you might have to talk her out of becoming an archaeologist afterward

  2. Robyn says:

    Interlibrary Loan | An old favourite I was glad to see again | Like apparently everybody else who ever read this book I stumbled across it in the school library when I was about ten The heiroglyphs on the spine caught the attention of my Egypt obsessed younger self who grew into my Egypt loving current self and I checked it out repeatedly over the next couple years before moving on to other schools and forgetting about it As an adult a long Google search involving what details I remembered and the colour of the cover finally led me back to it but with such poor availability I didn't expect to read it again Until last week when I remembered the ILL The book arrived at my library uickly and I read it in a sitting glad to discover it holds up to the reread Oh there are things here and there I uirked an eyebrow at all characters act far older than their stated ages but I was impressed at how well Morrison's narrative still fits what we've pieced together from the archaeological record while being interesting and making the reader sympathize with the protagonistsSince they don't seem interested in getting the estate's permission to re issue the copies that exist and which are mostly in libraries where they take a beating are all there will be When they're gone that's it So I've transcribed a copy for personal use It's too bad the author probably never learned how many generations enjoyed her research and writing

  3. Ashley says:

    I would recommend this book to any youth between 12 and 16 who enjoys a good historical adventure providing they could get their hands on a copy of it Unfortunately I have recently discovered that this book is out of print I didn't realize that when I acuired my very own tattered copy that the school librarian sought fit to save from deaccession destruction and give to me after seeing the check out card filled with only my signatures It was well worn and several times repaired from my repeated use I loved it then and still love it now The story though very loosely based in reality is unforgettable

  4. Sarah Sammis says:

    Fab novel about what happened to Akhenesamen after Tutankhamen died I read the book originally at a high school library in the Claremont neighborhood of San Diego during a break We were there for an Academic Decathalon competition I only got about halfway through the book and it took me nearly a decade to find another copy to finish the book

  5. Arne Adolfsen says:

    I think I checked this book out of the library times than any other when I was a kid

  6. Brianne says:

    I really enjoyed this book Morrison did a splendid job of breathing life into these historical figures and her descriptions were so detailed that I felt as if I was standing next to them Morrison also included a list of books for further reading and reference at the end which is very helpful I definitely recommend this one

  7. Becky Ankeny says:

    Lucile Morison brings the world of ancient Egypt alive through the eyes of a young princess who becomes Tutankhamon's ueen The depth of this book far exceeds ordinary fiction written for children It has religion politics intrigue gender history and culture I loved it as a kid and now Ankhsenpaaten the heroine learns to read and write unlike most girls joins the boys in driving chariots hunting fishing She marries Tutankhaten at the age of 12 normal for the times and royalty and they uickly learn the power of the priests of Amon and must change their names to honor that god hiding their loyalty to Aten It is a book filled with love within a family love of friends and true love of course The plotting is leisurely for about half the book It's a meaty book for voracious readers of any age I should add that it was published in 1937 not long after the discovery of King Tut's tomb but well before DNA testing etcWhy is Lucile Morison the lost ueen of children's literature? This was wonderful

  8. Debra Giuffrida says:

    This is the book that started it all for me My love of the 18th dynasty of ancient Egypt KemetKmt stemmed from this book and from my aunt Minnie who was a student of Professor Carter the discoverer of King Tutankhamenaten's tomb The fond memories I hold for this book probably colors my review I now know that the book is based on old knowledge of the time but that doesn't diminish my love for it Knowing that little Tut could never have showed the athleticism that is suggested in the book and knowing that Akhenaten fathered the boy king on his own sister also does not make me love the book lessSo if I find a copy that I can afford it will sit in an honored position on my bookshelves

  9. Leroy Erickson says:

    As I think of them I'm adding books that I remember reading when I was young This book is one that I found in my high school library and I was attracted to it because it was about ancient Egypt It's a novelization of the life of the daughter of King Tut Tutankhamon or Tutenkhaten as he preferred I remember how much I loved the book and how much I learned about life in ancient Egypt I would love to have a copy now and to recommend it but it's out of print and the cheapest copy that I can find online is 200 So if you run across a copy in a library or in a used book sale grab it and read it You'll be glad that you didI did get a copy and reread it for the first time in about 50 years Thank you Jeanie It is a very good book

  10. Joan says:

    Like many others I read this as a schoolgirl Like many others I remember absolutely loving it I think I already had an interest in Ancient Egypt but this must have solidified that interest As someone commented it is probably pretty loosely based on the historical record and a lot has been discovered since the book was written I'm off to see if my library has a copy

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