Taken Captive: A Japanese POW's Story




      Taken Captive: A Japanese POW's Story
I do not know whether I dozed off or passed out, but the next thing I remember is gradually becoming aware of a blunt object striking my body over and over Just as I realized it was a boot kicking me in the side, I felt my arm being grabbed roughly, and I returned to full consciousness One GI had hold of my right arm, and another had his rifle pointed at me, nearly touching me Don t move We re taking you prisoner, the one with the rifle said On January 25, 1945, Private Ooka Shohei of the Japanese Imperial Army was captured by American forces in the Philippines Near death from starvation and acute malaria, he was nursed back to health by his captors and shipped off to a POW camp Taken Captive is his powerful and poignant account of life as a prisoner of war Long regarded as a literary classic in Japan, this extraordinary memoir is appearing in English for the first time.There are no epic battles or grand scale heroics This is an intimate, gripping, and ultimately enlightening true story of a sophisticated, middle aged scholar thrown into a primitive struggle for survival It is filled with moments of sublime ordinariness prisoners passing time by playing 20 Questions and heartstopping encounters a lone soldier decides whether or not to shoot an unsuspecting enemy soldier.The harsh conditions, the daily routines that occupy a prisoner s time, and above all, the psychological struggles and behavioral quirks of captives forced to live in close confinement are conveyed with devastating simplicity and candor Throughout, the author constantly probes his own conscience, questioning motivations and decisions What emerges is a multileveled portrait of an individual determined to retain his humanity in an uncivilized environment.In Taken Captive, Ooka Shohei provides much than an unprecedented look at the POW experience from a Japanese point of view His stirring account offers a penetrating exploration of Japanese society, and its values, as embodied by the microcosm of his fellow POWs Recalling his wartime experiences, Ooka Shohei has created a brilliant work of rare honesty, insight, and emotional subtlety. Read Taken Captive: A Japanese POW's Story Author Shōhei Ōoka – heartforum.co.uk

Sh hei oka oka Sh hei was a Japanese novelist, literary critic, and translator of French literature active in Sh wa period Japan oka belongs to the group of postwar writers whose World War II experiences at home and abroad figure prominently in their works Over his lifetime, he contributed short stories and critical essays to almost every literary magazine in Japan.

✓ Free Download ☆ 
      Taken Captive: A Japanese POW's Story
 Author Shōhei Ōoka ↠ applied mathematics – heartforum.co.uk
  • Kindle Edition
  • 352 pages
  • Taken Captive: A Japanese POW's Story
  • Shōhei Ōoka
  • English
  • 22 November 2017

10 thoughts on “ Taken Captive: A Japanese POW's Story

  1. Sarah Crawford says:

    The book is about a Japanese soldier who was taken captive in World War II The book is quite an interesting one, especially the insights it gives into how Japanese soldiers thought.Some of the noteworthy things He was captured on January 25, 1945 He was suffering from malaria and had dropped out of a group retreat, and was captured by American soldiers I say that because the book shows how important the Philippine guerrillas were, and how many Japanese soldiers they either captured or outrig The book is about a Japanese soldier who was taken captive in World War II The book is quite an interesting one, especially the insights it gives into how Japanese soldiers thought.Some of the noteworthy things He was captured on January 25, 1945 He was suffering from malaria and had dropped out of a group retreat, and was captured by American soldiers I say that because the book shows how important the Philippine guerrillas were, and how many Japanese soldiers they either captured or outright killed.He had given up on a Japanese victory, and held contempt for the General Staff of the military.He had a chance to kill an American soldie...

  2. Nona says:

    This is almost the same as Fires on the plain , only a littlerough and exhausted trip in the tropical jungle in the WWII.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *