Their Darkest Hour




      Their Darkest Hour
How could Nazi killers shoot Jewish women and children at close range Why did Japanese soldiers rape and murder on such a horrendous scale How was it possible to endure the torment of a Nazi concentration camp Award winning documentary maker and historian Laurence Rees has spent nearly 20 years wrestling with these questions in the course of filming hundreds of interviews with people tested to the extreme during World War II He has come face to face with rapists, mass murderers, even cannibals, but he has also met courageous individuals who are an inspiration to us all.In Their Darkest Hour he presents 35 of his most electrifying encounters. Download Their Darkest Hour – heartforum.co.uk

In addition to writing, Rees has also produced films about World War II for the BBC.In New York in January 2009, Laurence was presented with the Lifetime Achievement Award by History Makers , the worldwide congress of History and Current Affairs programme makersIn 2011 he was awarded an Honorary Doctorate DUniv by The Open University UK.


      Their Darkest Hour
 By Laurence Rees IBN : 0091917573 Format : Hardcover – heartforum.co.uk
  • Hardcover
  • Their Darkest Hour
  • Laurence Rees
  • English
  • 14 January 2018
  • 0091917573

10 thoughts on “ Their Darkest Hour

  1. Lauren Hopkins says:

    Really like 2.5 stars Half impressive and half a letdown I was hoping, based on the other works I ve read of this author s, that this would be a massively in depth look at how human beings are able to go on living their lives after committing atrocities and living through wildly horrific ordeals That s what this book is at its core, using the most awful situations experienced in WWII to explore what it s like to live through them, told via interviews with the people who actually had to live Really like 2.5 stars Half impressive and half a letdown I was hoping, based on the other works I ve read of this author s, that this would be a massively in depth look at how human beings are able to go on li...

  2. Simon Dobson says:

    It s hard to mark a book like this as four stars, since it s a harrowing rather than a purely enjoyable read Nevertheless, it s a phenomenal work that really complements the author s other accompishments It s a series of interviews with people involved in various aspects of World War 2, including both victims an victimisers, and tries to get them to open up about their experiences and motivations Some of the people appear in Rees other books, notably Auschwitz, the Nazis, and the Final It s hard to mark a book like this as four stars, since it s a harrowing rather than a purely enjoyable read Nevertheless, it s a phenomenal work that really complements the author s other accompishments It s a series of interviews with people involved in various aspects of World War 2, including both victims an victimisers, and tries to get them to open up about their experiences and motivations Some of the people appear in Rees other books, notably Auschwitz, the Nazis, and the Final Solution, and one can read these extended interviews in the wider context of their experiences Rees do...

  3. S.P. Harrison says:

    This is a book of interviews conducted by Rees of hundreds of people who endured the cruelties of the Second World War Extraordinarily he also interviews those who carried out such atrocities giving Rees a..comparative, cross cultural perspective on the horrors of the war that no academic could match Rees writes in an easy and fluid way not the dry, dense writing that one would expect from an academic Central to this book is not only his incredulity at how people could behave in This is a book of interviews conducted by Rees of hundreds of people who endured the cruelties of the Second World War Extr...

  4. Paul Loong says:

    The 35 interviewees, whether they are the mass murderer, rapist, soldiers, survivors, or citizens, all have their own reasons or excuses for what they have done in WWII To us, this seems to be unbelievable that they have made such decisions and most of them do not regret for what they have done But, as the author says, position yourself in the same situation as them Would you do the same as them I myself do think that this book has given me another direction on viewing such topic It is The 35 interviewees, whether they are the mass murderer, rapist, soldiers, survivors, or citizens, all have their own reasons or excuses for what they have done in WWII To us, this seems to be unbelievable that they have made such decisions and most of them do not regret for what they have done But, as the author says, position yourself in the same situation a...

  5. Craig says:

    This is a collection interviews of people who survived WWII Some were victims, some were villains Rees tries to understand the spot these people were in sometimes his commentary is chilling and psychological butoften it is dry and detracts from the story I would have probably preferre...

  6. Michael Flanagan says:

    This book is fantastic It allows the reader to see the mind set of the people who committed the atrocities of world war II Why not excusing their actions it allows an insight into their reasonings behind their actions This book for me captures the essence of what fascinates me, ...

  7. Squid McFinnigan says:

    I was very interested in reading this book, after all, how could anyone understand the horror of those times unless they were there.Mr Rees approached this book in the same way an academic would approach a medical study, which means that this book is most likely a very true representation of what people experienced.However, this unemotional approach had a down side for me I was left flat, emotionally, after reading what must have been the most difficult memories for these people to relive I I was very interested in reading this book, after all, how could anyone understand the horror of those times unless t...

  8. Russ says:

    an interesting read if you haven t read any of the author s other books before this revisits some of the interviews from his earlier works, such as The Nazis, Horror in the East Auschwitz, but puts them into a personal context, where Rees looks back over his own feelings concerning the interviewees experiences, motivations beliefs There are some horrors there, but also a couple of people who did what they thought was right, suffered the consequences for the rest of their lives, an interesting read if...

  9. Shelley says:

    Maybe terrible adversity would bring out the best in us, or, just maybe, it would reveal the worst What do you think What would you have done pg 278 An excellent question and one that keeps being asked throughout this thought provoking and interesting book.

  10. Keen says:

    4.5 Stars I didn t have any regrets, to put it bluntly I was twenty one years old that summer of the fire bombing And I really was wanting to get the war over and I wanted to go home And if they told me to go and bomb some cities, I went and bombed cities So says, one American officer, who would go onto lead a productive life as lawyer in the US after the war What this testimony andlike it show, is how distance and remoteness from victims can sanitise the horror, whilst also paving 4.5 Stars I didn t have any regrets, to put it bluntly I was twenty one years old that summer of the fire bombing And I really was wanting to get the war over and I wanted to go home And if they told me to go and bomb some cities, I went and bombed cities So says, one American officer, who would go onto lead a productive life as lawyer in the US after the war What this testimony andlike it show, is how distance and remoteness from victims can sanitise the horror, whilst also paving the way for a greater emotional and psychological detachment, reducing the act of killing, to the simple act of pressing a button or pulling a le...

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