Foul Means: The Formation of a Slave Society in Virginia, 1660-1740

Foul Means: The Formation of a Slave Society in Virginia, 1660-1740[Download] ➺ Foul Means: The Formation of a Slave Society in Virginia, 1660-1740 By Anthony S. Parent Jr. – Heartforum.co.uk Challenging the generally accepted belief that the introduction of racial slavery to America was an unplanned consequence of a scarce labor market, Anthony Parent, Jr contends that during a brief peri Challenging The Formation of a PDF \ the generally accepted belief that the introduction The Formation MOBI ☆ of racial slavery to America was an unplanned consequence of a scarce labor market, Anthony Parent, Jr contends that during a brief period spanning the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries a small but powerful planter class, acting to further its emerging economic interests, intentionally brought racial slavery to Virginia Parent bases his argument on three historical developments the expropriation of Powhatan lands, the switch from indentured to slave labor, and the burgeoning tobacco trade He argues that these were the result of calculated Foul Means: ePUB × moves on the part of an emerging great planter class seeking to consolidate power through large landholdings and the labor to make them productive To preserve their economic and social gains, this planter class inscribed racial slavery into law The ensuing racial and class tensions led elite planters to mythologize their position as gentlemen of pastoral virtue immune to competition and corruption To further this benevolent image, they implemented a plan to Christianize slaves and thereby render them submissive According to Parent, by the s the Virginia gentry projected a distinctive cultural ethos Means: The Formation Kindle × that buffered them from their uncertain hold on authority, threatened both by rising imperial control and by black resistance, which exploded in the Chesapeake Rebellion of.

Is The Formation of a PDF \ a well known author, some of his The Formation MOBI ☆ books are a fascination for readers like in the Foul Means: The Formation of a Slave Society in Virginia, book, this is one of the most wanted Anthony S Parent Jr author readers around the world.

Foul Means: The Formation of a Slave Society in Virginia,
    Import EPUB to the Program Import EPUB these were the result of calculated Foul Means: ePUB × moves on the part of an emerging great planter class seeking to consolidate power through large landholdings and the labor to make them productive To preserve their economic and social gains, this planter class inscribed racial slavery into law The ensuing racial and class tensions led elite planters to mythologize their position as gentlemen of pastoral virtue immune to competition and corruption To further this benevolent image, they implemented a plan to Christianize slaves and thereby render them submissive According to Parent, by the s the Virginia gentry projected a distinctive cultural ethos Means: The Formation Kindle × that buffered them from their uncertain hold on authority, threatened both by rising imperial control and by black resistance, which exploded in the Chesapeake Rebellion of."/>
  • Paperback
  • 312 pages
  • Foul Means: The Formation of a Slave Society in Virginia, 1660-1740
  • Anthony S. Parent Jr.
  • English
  • 05 October 2019
  • 0807854867

10 thoughts on “Foul Means: The Formation of a Slave Society in Virginia, 1660-1740

  1. Camilla says:

    This was an interesting argument I couldn t help seeing the book as a research paper since it had all the qualifications of academic scholarly writing If my capstone history professor had written his thesis on the evolution of slavery in colonial Virginia, it would read just like this book did That is to say, it was a wonderful read full of fascinating information regarding three main societal shifts that contributed to the culture of slavery in America agriculture, patriarchism, and Christi This was an interesting argument I couldn t help seeing the book as a research paper since it had all the qualifications of academic scholarly writing If my capstone history professor had written his thesis on the evolution of slavery in colonial Virginia, it would read just like this book did That is to say, it was a wonderful read full of fascinating information regarding three main societal shifts that contributed to the culture of slavery in America agriculture, patriarchism, and Christianity.Obviously the tobacco crop as the dominant source of wealth in Virginia was a large factor in the use of slaves The crop grew well and original farmers grew very rich off of its profits, leading to a huge land grab by newly landed Englishmen that could be intensified by greedy black headright patents havingslaves allowed a landowner to receiveland This led to increasing inflation of tobacco, which required tobacco farmers to cultivate the cropcheaply, which in turn required slaves over servants Barbados and Jamaica had long practiced slavery so it was a relatively easy thing to initially introduce Virginia to the practice With the increase of slaves came an increased risk of uprisings, so that wealthy white landowners serving as judges and politicians had to create new laws that kept slaves in line They introduced creative tortures and punishments for runaways and sought to restrain the liberties awarded to all humanity from including slaves They also fed the concept of status, encouraging poor white farmers and servants to see themselves as above the fate of slaves, even though economically they were in a similar state This class distinction discouraged indentured servants from uprising with slaves, from intermarrying, and from aiding runaway slaves Patriarchism helped these powerful and wealthy landowners gain ultimate control over not just slaves, but from women and servants.Finally, slaves were encouraged to become Christians in the hopes that it would coax them to becomedocile and servile Initially baptizing a slave as a Christian was frowned upon because it could be used later as an argument for freedom Earlier than 1700, being a born Christian before entering into slavery in the colonies was means for emancipation Because of this, slaves were enthusiastic about being baptized and landowners sought to prevent it Over time, however, Christian theology was taught to slaves as a means to discourage them from insurrection They were taught to behaveChristian like so as to lose desire for violence and resistance This tool is the most despicable to me since it taints a pure doctrine in order to serve a selfish desire It warps the true meaning of Christianity and makes it into something ugly and evil.Overall, it was a truly fascinating read The author concludes his argument with the year 1740, but I wish I could read what happened over the next fifty years to see the expansion and evolution continue

  2. Rachel says:

    Parent s main goal in this book is to investigatedeeply the time period between Bacon s Rebellion 1676 and the American Revolution in which Virginia moved solidly into a hierarchical society grounded in race based slavery He s not so much arguing against Edmund Morgan s American Slavery, American Freedom, as saying that Morgan s work, which as Parent reports it culminates in Bacon s rebellion, leaves out an important part of the story of the rise of slavery and the planter class in Vi Parent s main goal in this book is to investigatedeeply the time period between Bacon s Rebellion 1676 and the American Revolution in which Virginia moved solidly into a hierarchical society grounded in race based slavery He s not so much arguing against Edmund Morgan s American Slavery, American Freedom, as saying that Morgan s work, which as Parent reports it culminates in Bacon s rebellion, leaves out an important part of the story of the rise of slavery and the planter class in Virginia Parent does a careful and thorough job of tracing the development of the planter class in Virginia using a Marxist class lens , the role of law and slave rebellion in solidifying the move to race based slavery, and then brings the book home by tracing the later development of patriarchism and the decision to Christianize slaves I assigned this book to students in a lower level Colonial America history course We had some great discussions about the rise of race based slavery in Virginia, and expanded upon that discussion by comparing Parent s book to Dunn s Sugar and Slaves, about the rise of planters in the West Indies It made for a useful paring

  3. behemothing says:

    Solid overview of the early decades of slavery in Virginia, specifically the growth of an elite planter class, the role of Christianity, and the transition from a baroque labor system of indentured servitude to one built around race based slavery Makes an argument for the centrality of planter elite ideology of patrimonialism in the consolidation of Virginia s socio economic system As a non specialist in this field, I got the most out of the chapters on the land grab creation of mass esta Solid overview of the early decades of slavery in Virginia, specifically the growth of an elite planter class, the role of Christianity, and the transition from a baroque labor system of indentured servitude to one built around race based slavery Makes an argument for the centrality of planter elite ideology of patrimonialism in the consolidation of Virginia s socio economic system As a non specialist in this field, I got the most out of the chapters on the land grab creation of mass estates and the formation of an elite planter class in the last quarter of the 17th century and the section on the rise of specific legal regimes differentiated by race descent major pivot around 1740, after which there was a marked increase in laws punishments that discriminated against non whites Title comes from a 1736 letter which states An unhappy Effect of Many Negroes, is the necessity of being severe Numbers make them insolent, and then foul Means must do, what fair will not

  4. Christian Larsen says:

    Excellent and thorough history of the development of a tobacco economy and a slave society in VA, very well written history, but awfully boring.

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