The Maya (Ancient Peoples & Places)

The Maya (Ancient Peoples & Places)✽ The Maya (Ancient Peoples & Places) kindle Epub ❁ Author Michael D. Coe – Heartforum.co.uk Professor Coe incorporates the latest ideas and research in a fast changing field Spectacular tomb discoveries at the city of Copan reveal some of the early artistic and architectural splendours at th Professor Coe incorporates the latest ideas and research in a fast changing field Spectacular tomb discoveries at the city of Copan reveal some of the early artistic and architectural splendours at this major site New finds here and elsewhere entail a complete reinterpretation of the relationship between the warrior kings of the classic Maya lowlands and Teotihuacan, the greatest city of pre Conquest America Continuing epigraphic breakthroughs decipherments of Maya inscriptions demonstrate vividly the shifting power blocs among the competing Maya city states.

Michael D Coe was an American archaeologist, anthropologist, epigrapher and author Primarily known for his work on the Maya civilization.

The Maya Epub Ä Paperback
    The Maya Epub Ä Paperback complete reinterpretation of the relationship between the warrior kings of the classic Maya lowlands and Teotihuacan, the greatest city of pre Conquest America Continuing epigraphic breakthroughs decipherments of Maya inscriptions demonstrate vividly the shifting power blocs among the competing Maya city states."/>
  • Paperback
  • 256 pages
  • The Maya (Ancient Peoples & Places)
  • Michael D. Coe
  • English
  • 15 December 2018
  • 0500285055

10 thoughts on “The Maya (Ancient Peoples & Places)

  1. Nicky says:

    Reviewed for The Bibliophibian.There s no denying that Michael Coe is one of the foremost scholars of the Mayan world, and that this is known for being a prime text to introduce people to the Mayan world in an academic sense rather than a frivolous clearly they were inspired by aliens or other such conspiracy theory sense The volume is beautifully illustrated with photographs and diagrams, and Coe and Houston are painstakingly clear in explaining the lie of the land, the boundaries of Maya Reviewed for The Bibliophibian.There s no denying that Michael Coe is one of the foremost scholars of the Mayan world, and that this is known for being a prime text to introduce people to the Mayan world in an academic sense rather than a frivolous clearly they were inspired by aliens or other such conspiracy theory sense The volume is beautifully illustrated with photographs and diagrams, and Coe and Houston are painstakingly clear in explaining the lie of the land, the boundaries of Maya influence, the history of the places that contributed to their development as a cohesive people, and the broad reach of their civilisation.But There was something dry about this and though you might be inclined to put that down to this being non fiction, I read a very similar book on the Incas just a little later and found it riveting Even the dullest details of stone placed upon stone can be livened up by an understanding of the people, and I didn t really find that here I ve also got Coe s book on deciphering the Mayan script, and I m hoping that brings things to life a little .The sign of a good non fiction book, for me, is that I have an endless store of things to share about it at the end Coe and Houston s book didn t get there, for me It s still a great primer if you want to go deeper into understanding the Maya, and it s worth looking at for the collection of images alone, but it s not the most entertaining book I ve ever brought home from the library

  2. Jacques Coulardeau says:

    The Greatness of the Maya before ethnocide and genocideThe main interest of this book is that it follows the standard history of the Maya from beginning to end and city after city The index is then very useful to follow one particular city or one particular reference Each case is both described in what has survived, in what we can know about them and what has been said about them too The bringing up together of the whole subject in some synthetic approach on some questions is at the end of th The Greatness of the Maya before ethnocide and genocideThe main interest of this book is that it follows the standard history of the Maya from beginning to end and city after city The index is then very useful to follow one particular city or one particular reference Each case is both described in what has survived, in what we can know about them and what has been said about them too The bringing up together of the whole subject in some synthetic approach on some questions is at the end of the book and it is both useful because very synthetic and frustrating because very skimpy This synthesis though gives us some elements about the language, the writing system, the mathematics, the calendars, the four codices and a fast survey of what happened after the arrival of the Spaniards and what has been the fate of the Mayas since this arrival The authors are clear, and they qualify this fate as being ethnocide and genocide on a grand scale The two massive crimes against humanity are of a different nature Ethnocide targets the destruction of the culture of a people to force them into deculturation and then into acculturation in a culture that has little to do with their original culture The book though insists on the fact the various Spanish and then Ladino people who imposed that ethnocide could easily succeed because of the many common points between Maya religion and Christianity The book insists on the fact that the Maya main god, the Maize God, is very similar to Jesus because he is put to death every year after the harvest for the winter and it is resurrected every spring from the very maize kernels or grains For the Maya, maize is not a simple plant, but it is a person, a divine being that must be sacrificed every year to be able to be reborn the following year Genocide, on the other hand, is the killing of as many members of this group, the Maya, as possible in the shortest time possible.Maybe the book does not insist enough on the fact that this divine sacrifice has deep roots in ageneral mythology, particularly the Popol Vuh and the Divine Twins The rebirth of the Maize god is to be obtained with the sacrifice of animals, but especially self sacrifice with bloodletting, and human sacrifice The book insists on the fact the sacrificed human beings were war prisoners, slaves, and orphans or handicapped children I am not sure this is enough Such human sacrifices or self sacrifices created a demographic problem that might have partly been the result of some kind of dealing with overpopulation with sexual self sacrifice for men that resulted in some kind of contraception, with the sacrifice of males that resulted in less sexual male partners, and with the sacrifice of orphans and handicapped children that led to both eugenics and the reduction of male sexual procreators It must be clearly said that such practices targeted men and practically only men, carried out by male priests and helpers, and this male domination is a typical trait of post Ice Age agriculture A last remark on this topic is that it does not and I guess it cannot indicate the real origin of such a vast practice, though it seems to have been contained within some limits by the Maya, whereas it was brought to some extreme levels by the Aztecs It is yet remarkable that such massive human sacrifices were a common trait of all south and Meso American civilization from what is today Peru to Mexico The author should also have insisted on the fact that such practices were absolutely marginal among northern American Indians The debate about John Smith and Pocahontas is typical John Smith was put through a procedure of integration in the tribe Pocahontas represented and not in any way menaced in his life Only his outsider s life was symbolically killed for his tribe member s life to be delivered by Pocahontas herself who was an initiated priestess The second question this synthesis brings up is that of the Maya language that we only know through its writing system This writing system is only available in surviving inscriptions in stone or in wall paintings or on all kinds of tools, utensils, and objects for everyday life or for body embellishment pots, cups, plates, boxes, etc., plus jewels and all sorts of beads or rings The book cannot answer how long it took the Maya to devise and develop this written language and it cannot answer the simple question of how long Maya language had been in existence before the Maya society invented the writing system that needed an elite body of writing scribes The fact that the Spaniards destroyed all the books the Maya had, except four that managed to escape that ethnocidal action, is depriving us of the necessary information about the past, the mythology, the history, etc., of the Maya The timeline generally given is based too much on what we have at our disposal which is only what has survived and was produced in a highly advanced society A human society does not decide to build pyramids and massive temples and vast cities in one generation 30 years The only thing we know is that such massive constructions only appeared after the peak of the Ice Age and it took many thousand years for the social organizations that would build these constructions to emerge and stabilize But what must be studied today is the timeline of such constructions Satellite viewing has revealed the same type of constructions exists in the high valley of ia Are they older than the Maya pyramids or younger Are they the proof this stone constructing civilization went up north from the south or down south from the north In the second hypothesis, where did they come from since we do not find such stone constructions in Northern America The object of this book is not to explore the language itself So, do not expect a lot of detail This remark can be extended to what is said about the mathematics and the calendars of the Maya The Tzolkin calendar, in particular, is not explained in its ritual dimension since it is supposed to enable the priests to announce and order the various rites including human sacrifices in the social timeline of everyday life But that s not the object of the book You will have to look forinformation and I must admit that the role of Venus who is the embodiment of the second most important God, Kukulkan the Maya version of Quetzalcoatl, the Plumed Serpent , who is a God who was sacrificed and whose Second Coming is announced from the East on some kind of ship The Spaniards were wrongly understood by some like the Aztecs as being the Second Coming of Quetzalcoatl Note this Second Coming is not clearly indicated as being a common point with Christianity and the Second Coming of Jesus bringing Doomsday, the Apocalypse, and the Last Judgment In fact, such parallel visions should bring us to the question of how in so distant places on earth civilizations that were so un connected could devise such parallel visions What made Maya or Mesoamerican mythologies produce patterns that are so parallel and similar to those produced by Biblical writers and even before them Zoroastrian or Sumerian Mesopotamian writers There is no direct connection between these two geographical and historical zones and periods So, do humans have some mental frame that is the same all over the world and hence has a unique source Note this second coming pattern can be found in many cultures and civilizations in very distant times, at least times that provide us with some surviving testimony So, to conclude on this very interesting and very well illustrated book, let s say you will have a lot of work still to do to answer the questions I have put forward.Dr Jacques COULARDEAU

  3. Erik Graff says:

    This was the best of the introductory books I ve read about the Maya Coe is a clear and engaging writer, excellent as a popularist Newer editions are much updated as the Mayan script has since been decyphered For an account of that see his Breaking the Mayan Code.

  4. Sarah - All The Book Blog Names Are Taken says:

    My Blog The Book Nook s always a bummer when I think I am really interested in a topic and then after one book about said topic, I am completely unsure if my interest is waning or if the writing is just that dry dull etc.In this case, I think it is that the writing is just that dry and I felt like I was reading a textbook Now, before you say, But it s non fiction I should point out that I read non fiction almost exclusively these days and have My Blog The Book Nook s always a bummer when I think I am really interested in a topic and then after one book about said topic, I am completely unsure if my interest is waning or if the writing is just that dry dull etc.In this case, I think it is that the writing is just that dry and I felt like I was reading a textbook Now, before you say, But it s non fiction I should point out that I read non fiction almost exclusively these days and have for quite some time And thisI just could not get interested in it Even the pictures started to look the same after a while, and that in itself is sort of depressing, because usually maps and pictures are a welcome relief when the writing is too bogged down by the author s extensive knowledge I realize that one would like their non fiction writers to be knowledgeable and I appreciate the fact that Coe is beyond well versed in his knowledge of the Maya However, there is just SO MUCH that it is almost too much Perhaps the problem is I have very little background knowledge of my own and thus my very shaky foundation can t hold what was delivered in this text Unfortunately, due to its dryness, that foundation is not much sturdier now that I ve finished the book than it was before

  5. MG Mason says:

    I always like to have a factual book on the go at the same time as a fiction and though books like this are generally oftenwork than pleasure, I must say that this was a pleasurable read as an introduction to a subject I previously knew very little about.Quite possibly the most comprehensive book written on The Maya to date It reads well both for a general audience and for scholarly readers I bought this on recommendation of one of my University lecturers in preparation for my honeymoon I always like to have a factual book on the go at the same time as a fiction and though books like this are generally oftenwork than pleasure, I must say that this was a pleasurable read as an introduction to a subject I previously knew very little about.Quite possibly the most comprehensive book written on The Maya to date It reads well both for a general audience and for scholarly readers I bought this on recommendation of one of my University lecturers in preparation for my honeymoon to Mexico because I had not studied Meso America either as part of my academic studies nor for pleasure.Coe has constructed a volume rich in illustration, description, plenty of maps, explanations that are easy on the eye and covering the sum total of Maya history from the earliest settlers to the European conquest He uses a backdrop that we from a European heritage would understand by putting it in context of world events It also looks at modern ideals of the Maya and how their culture permeates today.This is a superb introduction for any student of Maya history and Archaeology written by one of its foremost scholarsSeebook reviews at my blog

  6. Bob Nichols says:

    Coe gives a good overview of the Mayans Though he refers to the Mayans as one ethnic group, the book describes their great diversity, as might be expected from a people who lived across Guatemala, Belize, central Mexico, and the Yucatan Coe divides Mayan history into several periods, beginning with the Archaic 3,000 1,000 BCE and ending with the post Classic A.D 925 1500 with the Spanish invasion and conquest, the effect of which has been the obliteration or incorporation of Mayan cultu Coe gives a good overview of the Mayans Though he refers to the Mayans as one ethnic group, the book describes their great diversity, as might be expected from a people who lived across Guatemala, Belize, central Mexico, and the Yucatan Coe divides Mayan history into several periods, beginning with the Archaic 3,000 1,000 BCE and ending with the post Classic A.D 925 1500 with the Spanish invasion and conquest, the effect of which has been the obliteration or incorporation of Mayan culture Coe s last chapter summarizes how this practice continues to this day.The richness of this culture is seen in the Mayan ruins, particularly the ceremonial centers spread throughout this large area, but Coe s descriptions come acrossor less as a listing without much of an attempt to explain the reasons for them and their significance Given that the pre Columbian Mayan culture evolved totally void of contact with the cultures of Asia and Europe, it is interesting to speculate about what pre Columbian cultural practices religious beliefs and practices, etc reveal about human nature

  7. Alex says:

    Extremely dense think of this as a textbook but apparently the most comprehensive collection of information about the Maya So says Jared Diamond, who says so in the Further Reading section of Collapse How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed I learned a lot but it was slow going.Fun trivia you know that 2012 bs ETA we ve all forgotten this but there were some nutjobs who thought the world was going to end in 2012 It s this guy s fault In an earlier edition of this book, he idly po Extremely dense think of this as a textbook but apparently the most comprehensive collection of information about the Maya So says Jared Diamond, who says so in the Further Reading section of Collapse How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed I learned a lot but it was slow going.Fun trivia you know that 2012 bs ETA we ve all forgotten this but there were some nutjobs who thought the world was going to end in 2012 It s this guy s fault In an earlier edition of this book, he idly pointed out that the Mayan calendar is cyclical and a cycle ends in 2012 conspiracy theorists took it from there In this edition he comments on it, with a combination of shame and amusement

  8. Al says:

    Pretty good read and a decent overview of the Maya It is profusely illustrated with photographs and line drawings, and a very good section on the calendar and the Long Count A big frustration with this book is that Coe will describe an architectural feature, or a piece of jade work, or a stela in terms that make the reader acknowledge its importance, but there s no picture He does this throughout the text and by the time I finished the book, I was ready to say good riddance The book is a Pretty good read and a decent overview of the Maya It is profusely illustrated with photographs and line drawings, and a very good section on the calendar and the Long Count A big frustration with this book is that Coe will describe an architectural feature, or a piece of jade work, or a stela in terms that make the reader acknowledge its importance, but there s no picture He does this throughout the text and by the time I finished the book, I was ready to say good riddance The book is around 200 pages did the author and or publisher skimp on illustrations Future editions should be expanded to include some sort of illustration to accompany portions of the narrative that Coe is using to emphasize a piece of art of a building

  9. Loran (Inked with Curiosity) says:

    The Maya was a textbook I read for my Archaeology of Mexico class and I actually read the entire thing I am very proud of this haha I thought that the book was informative and also simple enough where a student or a leisure reader could pick it up and have no trouble getting into it The book was full of beautiful pictures, some full color and was also very comprehensive in its subject matter Coe deftly takes you through the entirety of the Maya Empire and I can honestly say I learned a l The Maya was a textbook I read for my Archaeology of Mexico class and I actually read the entire thing I am very proud of this haha I thought that the book was informative and also simple enough where a student or a leisure reader could pick it up and have no trouble getting into it The book was full of beautiful pictures, some full color and was also very comprehensive in its subject matter Coe deftly takes you through the entirety of the Maya Empire and I can honestly say I learned a lot and had a pretty decent time reading the book I m sure the newer editions have evencurrent information so if you can afford it as a student and you love this subject I d say its worth buying the newest edition

  10. Ricardo says:

    I m read this in preparation for the lecture I have to give on SAS this May, and I m very impressed with how thorough and accessible it is I also like that Coe is up front about what is unknown and or debatable, and gives differing opinions about controversial questions.

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