Great and Desperate Cures: The Rise and Decline of Psychosurgery and Other Radical Treatments for Mental Illness



Great and Desperate Cures: The Rise and Decline of Psychosurgery and Other Radical Treatments for Mental IllnessAn Eminent University Of Michigan Neuroscientist Provides A Riveting, Definitive History Of Psychosurgery, Or Lobotomy, And At The Same Time Sounds An Urgent Warning About The Dangers Of Radical Therapies In All Of Medicine

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Great and Desperate Cures: The Rise and Decline of Psychosurgery and Other Radical Treatments for Mental Illness book, this is one of the most wanted Elliot S. Valenstein author readers around the world.

[[ Reading ]] ➶ Great and Desperate Cures: The Rise and Decline of Psychosurgery and Other Radical Treatments for Mental Illness Author Elliot S. Valenstein – Heartforum.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 384 pages
  • Great and Desperate Cures: The Rise and Decline of Psychosurgery and Other Radical Treatments for Mental Illness
  • Elliot S. Valenstein
  • English
  • 25 March 2019
  • 0465027113

10 thoughts on “Great and Desperate Cures: The Rise and Decline of Psychosurgery and Other Radical Treatments for Mental Illness

  1. Gofita says:

    Fascinating history on psychosugery lobotomies in the U.S., its rise and decline Very disturbing but informative.

  2. TriCedratops says:

    Academic read on the history of lobotomy and psychosurgery While it delves into the history and the men behind the movement, there is little on the patients that were lobotomizrd and their experiences.

  3. Lachelle says:

    Recommended from My Lobotomy

  4. Charles says:

    A great introduction to the era of psychosurgery Chilling.

  5. Barbara says:

    That this work was painstakingly researched is obvious the author seems to have traveled extensively, reviewed published works and personal correspondence of key players, and read numerous volumes and articles on his subject He illustrates how the living conditions of institutionalized mental patients during the 19th and 20th centuries, society s expectations of medicine, and the climate of the medical community contributed to extreme, and often dangerous, measures.The burden of caring for the That this work was painstakingly researched is obvious the author seems to have traveled extensively, reviewed published works and personal correspondence of key players, and read numerous volumes and articles on his subject He illustrates how the living conditions of institutionalized mental patients during the 19th and 20th centuries, society s expectations of medicine, and the climate of the medical community contributed to extreme, and often dangerous, measures.The burden of caring for the mentally ill wreaked havoc upon families and physicians pressure to find curative treatment was overwhelming, leading to measures such as chemical and electrical shock, injecting alcohol into the brain, and lobotomy in all of its variations With no one to protect them, patients were subjected to painful and disfiguring experimentation Not only were any positive effects generally temporary, if existent, the procedures carried what would now be considered an unacceptable risk of impairment or death Valenstein shows the constant jockeying for attention among the researchers and practitioners, each wanting maximum credit, and the ways in which the media stoked the fire Competition was fierce and legislation virtually non existent, creating an environment in which any opportunity, no matter how rash or dangerous, was taken.Though the book was written 20 years ago, Valenstein raises legitimate concerns about climate in which such atrocities could take place, one that he feels persists Media frenzy, laws that are alternately over restrictive or too lax, medical ambition, and the frustration of a lack of permanent cure are as pervasive now as in the early 1900 s

  6. Stephanie says:

    A detailed history of the rise and decline of psychosurgery, mostly focusing on lobotomy.Some gut wrenching details that left me reading in fascinated horror, and ultimately with huge amounts of pity for the patients who underwent lobotomy and like surgeries Especially given the lack of real evidence that they helped people andoften, ended up with them being far, far worse off , it s amazing that lobotomies were undertaken on so many patients many sarcastic thanks to Walter Freeman for A detailed history of the rise and decline of psychosurgery, mostly focusing on lobotomy.Some gut wrenching details that left me reading in fascinated horror, and ultimately with huge amounts of pity for the patients who underwent lobotomy and like surgeries Especially given the lack of real evidence that they helped people andoften, ended up with them being far, far worse off , it s amazing that lobotomies were undertaken on so many patients many sarcastic thanks to Walter Freeman for that

  7. Teresa TL Bruce says:

    I didn t actually finish this book, but I have renewed it so many times I finally HAD to return it to the library When I turned it in today I was on page 95, which appeared to be less than one third of the book.Fascinating insight into the early, experimental treatments for mental illness In some cases, patients were considered incurable anyway, so why not try anything that might possibly help I DO plan to check it out again and finish it one day

  8. Anne says:

    Very enlightening Although the author did seem to be anti psychosurgery, I found his presentation of the facts to be unbiased and thorough Positive aspects of the results of lobotomy were presented, as were the glaring deficiencies in the follow up to patient outcomes I believe that the book has provided me with the best overview of the lobotomy period of the metal health profession possible.

  9. Elizabeth says:

    Actually a very interesting from a researcher s viewpoint Somewhat horrifying and fascinating to read the history of psychosurgery, but that would probably be the case for many areas of medicine.

  10. Antti R says:

    Best book written on the subject of psychosurgery I would not recommend it to a layman but a person working in the medical field could find it very interesting.

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