Black Soldier, White Army: The 24th Infantry Regiment in Korea



Black Soldier, White Army: The 24th Infantry Regiment in KoreaThe Story Of The Th Infantry Regiment In Korea Is A Difficult One, Both For The Veterans Of The Unit And For The Army In The Early Weeks Of The Korean War, Most American Military Units Experienced Problems As The US Army Attempted To Transform Understrength, Ill Equipped, And Inadequately Trained Forces Into An Effective Combat Team While At The Same Time Holding Back The Fierce Attacks Of An Aggressive And Well Prepared Opponent In Addition To The Problems Other Regiments Faced In Korea, The Th Infantry Also Had To Overcome The Effects Of Racial Prejudice Ultimately The Soldiers Of The Regiment, Despite Steadfast Courage On The Part Of Many, Paid The Price On The Battlefield For The Attitudes And Misguided Policies Of The Army And Their Nation Several Previously Published Histories Have Discussed What Happened To The Th Infantry This Book Tells Why It Happened In Doing So, It Offers Important Lessons For Today S Army The Army And The Nation Must Be Aware Of The Corrosive Effects Of Segregation And The Racial Prejudices That Accompanied It The Consequences Of That System Crippled The Trust And Mutual Confidence So Necessary Among The Soldiers And Leaders Of Combat Units And Weakened The Bonds That Held The Th Together, Producing Profound Effects On The Battlefield I Urge The Reader To Study And Reflect On The Insights Provided In The Chapters That Follow We Must Ensure That The Injustices And Misfortunes That Befell The Th Never Occur Again

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Black Soldier, White Army: The 24th Infantry Regiment in Korea book, this is one of the most wanted William T. Bowers author readers around the world.

Ebook ➩ Black Soldier, White Army: The 24th Infantry Regiment in Korea Author William T. Bowers – Heartforum.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 316 pages
  • Black Soldier, White Army: The 24th Infantry Regiment in Korea
  • William T. Bowers
  • English
  • 08 October 2019
  • 1410224678

10 thoughts on “Black Soldier, White Army: The 24th Infantry Regiment in Korea

  1. Rob says:

    Black Soldier, White Army The 24th Infantry Regiment in Korea is a stunning book that helped me understand my white father s negative views of African Americans that were perceived by him in his military army service during the Korean War My father grew up in an all white small town where he worked from age 12 to 53 years old He had no interaction with minorities other than his stint in the U.S Army, which gave him a low opinion of African Americans, and a bias that often confused me as his Black Soldier, White Army The 24th Infantry Regiment in Korea is a stunning book that helped me understand my white father s negative views of African Americans that were perceived by him in his military army service during the Korean War My father grew up in an all white small town where he worked from age 12 to 53 years old He had no interaction with minorities other than his stint in the U.S Army, which gave him a low opinion of African Americans, and a bias that often confused me as his son However, upon reading this book, the mystery was solved concerning my father s prejudice In 1945, The board s members recognized that racial discrimination harmed the morale of the black soldier and avowed that the Army should eliminate at the earliest practicable moment, any special consideration based on race Even so, the system they proposed left the Army s practice of segregation largely undisturbed In their draft recommendation to the chief of staff, they proposed that black soldiers should work side by side with whites, perform the same kind of duties in the same units, and compete with whites on an equal basis But blacks should still live and eat in separate barracks and messes In the same way, the Army should abolish all black division size units in the postwar period but retain smaller segregated units of up to regimental size that could be grouped with larger white organizations 32.This line of division in reality between blacks and whites in the military, was still evident during my father s time of service So had it been over all the years of American history Time and again, the black soldier had demonstrated that he could fight well when given a fair chance, but after every war racial prejudice had intervened to erase the gains he and his race should have received The experience of the 24th Infantry was a case in point The unit accomplished as much as any white regiment fighting under similar circumstances on the American frontier, during the Spanish American War, and in World War II Yet few white officers paid any attention Official surveys and analyses set aside the accomplishments of the black soldier in those wars to concentrate on the failure of black units and the supposed infirmities of the African race No one admitted to the injustices at the root of the problem or to the fact that people denied even routine opportunities for education and advancement had little incentive to give their lives for the system that had failed them It would take another war for that to occur, and even then the advance would come reluctantly, after racial prejudice had oncetaken a heavy toll 26.I can only surmise that my father s army unit which never saw battlefield action contained African Americans who lacked the motivation and enthusiasm of the white soldiers who had been born and raised into America with advantages unknown to African American soldiers since their disadvantaged births Thus my father s negative vantage point of African Americans, especially after he returned home to his white small town and had no other interactions with African Americans though his best friend was a Native American minority that is, until my mother insisted he take her African American boss on a boat ride My father reluctantly did so and returned from the excursion pleasantly surprised The African American, who was the city manager of our small hometown and probably the lone minority in the area , had engaged my father in friendly conversation out on Lake Minnetonka My father had finally learned tolerance for African Americans And, now years later, this excellent book by Bowers, has helped me understand my father s previous blind spot and what he didn t understand of the injustices administered to African Americans Bower s book is good for a teachable lesson, like my late father s late learning out in a boat shared with an African American on Lake Minnetonka, where division was unified with the goodwill of small talk

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