Peck's Bad Boy and His Pa



Peck's Bad Boy and His PaMr Peck Was Born In New York In , But He Lived In Wisconsin From Until His Death, April , He Was Connected With Newspapers At Whitewater, Jefferson, La Crosse, And Milwaukee He Founded The Sun At La Crosse In , And Later Removed It To Milwaukee, Where He Called It Peck S Sun At One Time He Was Unquestionably The Best Known Writer In Wisconsin, And The Best Known Wisconsin Writer Throughout The Country, Which Fame Came To Him Through His Peck S Bad Boy Sketches He Was Also The Author Of Peck S Compendium Of Fun, Peck S Sunshine, Together With Almost Countless Sketches Which Usually Were In Some Way Connected With The Mischief Loving, Mirth Provoking Bad Boy Neighbors Of The Pecks In Whitewater Tend, By Their Recollection Of The Former Governor, To Confirm The Suspicion That Not All Of Peck S Bad Boy Was Fiction, And That The Author Himself May Have Played A Not Inconsiderable Part In The Scenes Therein Depicted Mr Peck S Fellow Citizens In Milwaukee Honored Him With The Mayoralty, And The Citizens Of The State Made Him Governor From To He Had A Keen Memory For His Old Friends And Citizens, Both Young And Old, Who Could Remind Him Of Some Of His Old Neighbors In Whitewater Or Jefferson Were Always Sure Of A Pleasant Chat With Him

George Wilbur Peck was an American writer, politician, and the 17th Governor of Wisconsin He founded newspapers in Ripon and La Crosse, Wisconsin The latter weekly newspaper contained Peck s humorous writings, including his famous Peck s Bad Boy stories.

☉ Peck's Bad Boy and His Pa PDF / Epub ❤ Author George W. Peck – Heartforum.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 348 pages
  • Peck's Bad Boy and His Pa
  • George W. Peck
  • English
  • 10 July 2019
  • 080950085X

10 thoughts on “Peck's Bad Boy and His Pa

  1. Majenta says:

    and then he threw a camp chair at me and told me to go to Gehenna Ma says that s the new hell they have got up in the revised edition of the Bible for bad boys p.18.

  2. Wes Cuffe says:

    Absolutely Hilarious, what a little bugger and what mischief he gets into, left with tears of laughter This is a book you will never forget, This is Calvin of Calvin and Hobbes circa 1885, maybe a little crueler to his father Great, great read

  3. Frederick says:

    These are hilarious little slapstick pieces, written by a former or was he sitting governor of, I believe, Michigan, in the late eighteen hundreds They were weekly newspaper columns Inasmuch as they were comic without being political, I d put thesein the mode of a forerunner to the comic strip In each story a mischievous lad ensnares his father In one story, the boy substitutes rubber bands for pasta on his father s dinner plate This sort of activity is repeated several hundred tim These are hilarious little slapstick pieces, written by a former or was he sitting governor of, I believe, Michigan, in the late eighteen hundreds They were weekly newspaper columns Inasmuch as they were comic without being political, I d put thesein the mode of a forerunner to the comic strip In each story a mischievous lad ensnares his father In one story, the boy substitutes rubber bands for pasta on his father s dinner plate This sort of activity is repeated several hundred times in this collection There are illustrations in the Dover facsimile edition, an edition I imagine is out of print now The illustrations are of the very realistic sort newspapers and dime novels sported in the late nineteenth century, and clearly these were made to accompany these stories The collection itself was issued originally around 1900 and I think it was a bestseller

  4. Carolyn says:

    I loved this book SO much I just seriously laughed and laughed I read parts out loud to my kids and they laughed Yes, he s the meanest kid I ever heard of, and I don t think the gang members in my neighborhood could even hold a candle to the vicious yet hilarious , things our boy has done Being from Milwaukee, I also found it amusing to picture the areas in the book as late 19th century streets It does help to be a bit familiar with the slang of the times, but if not, it is easy to Bing I loved this book SO much I just seriously laughed and laughed I read parts out loud to my kids and they laughed Yes, he s the meanest kid I ever heard of, and I don t think the gang members in my neighborhood could even hold a candle to the vicious yet hilarious , things our boy has done Being from Milwaukee, I also found it amusing to picture the areas in the book as late 19th century streets It does help to be a bit familiar with the slang of the times, but if not, it is easy to Bing the information Not for the faint of heart or wussy, touchy feely types

  5. Marko-Michael says:

    It will be quite helpful to move one s mindset to the 1880 s to appreciate the humour of the situations presented Having seen photographs of some of the sets and actors used in the theatrical version of these stories gave my mindimages on which to base my mental pictures Some knowledge of everyday life and speech during that period of American history is also helpful.

  6. Clarence Callahan says:

    Great NostalgiaThe book is a very entertaining piece of comical nostalgia from the 1880s Widely made into burlesque routines of the past and a stage play.

  7. George says:

    A hilarious collection of 19th century practical jokes.

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