Gentle Shepherding: Pastoral Ethics and Leadership



Gentle Shepherding: Pastoral Ethics and LeadershipNamed One Of The Top Ten Books For Parish Clergy For The Year 2006 By The Academy Of Parish Clergy Gentle Shepherding Offers A Rare Balance In An Introduction To Pastoral Ethics, One That Identifies Deeply With The Pastoral Vocation And Brings It Into Conversation With A Developed Body Of Ethical Theory The Goal Of The Book Is To Equip Seminarians And Pastors With Conceptual Resources For Clarifying Moral Responsibility In The Practice Of Ministry This Responsibility Includes Three Levels The Minister As A Moral Agent In Offering Care The Minister As A Moral Enabler In Encouraging Virtue In Others And The Minister As A Moral Leader In Facilitating Congregational Life And Witness In Society Helping Ministers And Seminarians To Think Anew About Their Responsibilities And The Moral Quandaries In Pastoral Practice, Gentle Shepherding Integrates Theory With Practice, Providing Case Material For Further Reflection And Discussion And At Least One Case Study Or Exercise Associated With Each Chapter.

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Gentle Shepherding: Pastoral Ethics and Leadership book, this is one of the most wanted Joseph E. Bush Jr. author readers around the world.

Free ↠ Gentle Shepherding: Pastoral Ethics and Leadership By Joseph E. Bush Jr. – Heartforum.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 208 pages
  • Gentle Shepherding: Pastoral Ethics and Leadership
  • Joseph E. Bush Jr.
  • English
  • 19 February 2019
  • 082721250X

10 thoughts on “Gentle Shepherding: Pastoral Ethics and Leadership

  1. Cappy says:

    Consider Alasdair MacIntyre s insight that our knowledge of virtues is primarily learned empirically rather than deduced neatly from theory, and that there is therefore a necessary empirical untidiness in our experience and knowledge of our own and others virtue pg 9 People in different cultures can have very different perceptions of the self pg 11 Consider H Richard Niebuhr s idea that we respond to others with an assumption of how they will respond back It s evidence of some s Consider Alasdair MacIntyre s insight that our knowledge of virtues is primarily learned empirically rather than deduced neatly from theory, and that there is therefore a necessary empirical untidiness in our experience and knowledge of our own and others virtue pg 9 People in different cultures can have very different perceptions of the self pg 11 Consider H Richard Niebuhr s idea that we respond to others with an assumption of how they will respond back It s evidence of some shared sense of meaning pg 14 Individuals entering such situations of ministry unprepared for the kinds of tragic choices involved in helping others either develop a capacity to make discriminating choices in offering help or they find themselves burning out We find that we simply cannot do all the good that we would like to do The duty is constant, but imperfect pg 22 It is not easy to consistently avoid harm in the practice of ministry Pastors who are especially sensitive to people s pain might even say it s impossible pg 24 Consider the four types of benevolence avoid causing harm, prevent harm, remove harm, and promote the good pg 28 The stringency of one s duty to prevent or remove harm would seem to be contingent on both these factors the relative severity of the harm in question and the degree to which one has the power to act or an ability to make a difference pg 30 When the need is great and the ability to help is significant such as the physician s professional skill , then one might be required to at least be a minimally decent Samaritan in rendering the necessary assistance pg 30 When are we obliged to help, and, conversely, when are we serving our own needs by helping pg 31 It is possible to err by attending to a problem beyond one s level of competence so that one causes or exacerbates harm rather than alleviates it pg 32 Consider that the leading indicator of a potential suicide is the specificity and detail of the plan pg 35 A minister may need to counsel with a person to help that person clarify his or her own thinking against a cacophony of family voices, demands, or expectations Seldom would it be helpful for the minister to assert vigorously his or her own values to the decision maker this would likely be counterproductive to the pastoral task of encouraging the person s own moral agency as one who is freely able to give consent pg 53 Bill Blackburn indicates, over, that in referring parishoners to other professions, he is careful to reassure them about the continuance of his pastoral relationship with them pg 65 I would add, over, that a part of this respect is to accept degrees of apparent irrationality in others decisions and actions In other words, a minister should respect a person s rational choice even when it seems marked by irrationality, and a minister should respect a person s moral agency even when it seems marked by immorality pg 68 Consider Sissela Bok s definition of lies as messages that are stated and intentionally deceptive pg 78 Consider Katie Cannon s thought that truth seemsdiscerned than heralded pg 89 Consider, too, Mary Daly s coined synonym for patriarchy phallocracy pg 89 Consider Walter Weist and Elwyn Smith s thought that discretion is essential to protect privacy but at an extreme it can become secretiveness pg 96 During times of deep doubt, we find it difficult to know with clarity whether we are preaching hypocritically because of our own lack of faith, or if we are preaching faithfully because we persevere in trust pg 101 All pastors go through periods of theological wrestling at a deep existential level, as well as at a cognitive intellectual one pg 103 Consider that ministry isthan an occupation and that no Christian ever leaves ministry pg, 104 Consider how gossip trivializes the subject pg 114 Consider Karen Labacqz s thought that justice is elusiveI often have the uncomfortable feeling that not all who cry justice mean the same thing by the term pg 130 Everyone is DUE justice Everyone must DO justice Wouldn t this be a great bumper sticker pg 133 Consider William Lazareth s thought that it is not merely what we do or where we do it, by rather why and how it is done, that pleases God pg 140 Whether the preacher encourages it or not and indeed whether the preacher even desires it or not , the very task of preaching and the person of the preacher are symbolic at a deep level for many listeners pg 155 Conflict is one of the costs of change This is not necessarily bad, but it never feels good pg 160 The gospel, John Snow affirms, promises salvation rather than survival pg 168 Our experience of ministry, however, is that we find ourselves moving quickly between these different roles and even doing them simultaneously pg 173 Listening allows us into the moral world of others When people know that we listen with respect, they extend that invitation to us pg 175

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