My Life in Orange




      My Life in Orange
At the age of six, Tim Guest was taken by his mother to a commune modeled on the teachings of the notorious Indian guru Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh The Bhagwan preached an eclectic doctrine of Eastern mysticism, chaotic therapy, and sexual freedom, and enjoyed inhaling laughing gas, preaching from a dentist s chair, and collecting Rolls Royces Tim and his mother were given Free Download Kindle ePUB My Life in Orange Author Tim Guest – heartforum.co.uk

Tim Guest c 1974 2009 was a journalist and the bestselling author of My Life in Orange Growing Up with the Guru, about his childhood on communes around the world Guest s articles have appeared in The New York Times, The Guardian, The Telegraph, New Scientist, and Vogue.

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      My Life in Orange
 ñ Kindle Author ↠ Tim Guest democratic republic of the congo – heartforum.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 320 pages
  • My Life in Orange
  • Tim Guest
  • English
  • 23 January 2019
  • 1862077207

10 thoughts on “ My Life in Orange

  1. Joshua Gross says:

    The difficulty with this book, at least for me, was the problem with it having to be both a memoir and a historical account Tim Guest was a child when all this was happening, so he wouldn t have had the relevant details at the time There are long passages about him as a child, unattended by adults like all the other kids and getting into mischief that I got rather tiresome after awhile, and then fascinating segments of researched information regarding the Rajneesh Most of the book dragged on The difficulty with this book, at least for me, was the problem with it having to be both a memoir and a historical account Tim Guest was a child when all this was happening, so he wouldn t have had the relevant details at the time There are long passages about him as a child, unattended by adults lik...

  2. Samilja says:

    This book just made me sad Guest s memoir chronicles his life roughly from age 2 to age 11 in and out of various ashrams and communes created by and for followers of the Indian guru Bagwhan Guest s mother is searching presumably for meaning in her life and with varying degrees of misguidance, love, neglect and naivete drags her young son into life among her fellow sannyasins The pa...

  3. Molly says:

    An admission with just the title, My Life in Orange Growing up with the Guru, I had somehow expected this to be about a child s experiences with monks The guru, in my imagined variation, would be the Buddha, but instead, after reading the back of the book out loud to my husband, who gently chided me at my omission is it true about pregnancy brain do I really have such enormous gaps in my thinking , I was transmitted right back to middle school, when one of my good friends was fascinated An admission with just the title, My Life in Orange Growing up with the Guru, I had somehow expected this to be about a child s experiences with monks The guru, in my imagined variation, would be the Buddha, but instead, after reading the back of the book out loud to my husband, who gently chided me at my omissi...

  4. Tegan says:

    After watching Wild Wild Country on Netflix I was interested in learningabout life in the communes This novel is from a child s perspective, and the author mainly lived in Europe, only briefly visiting the Oregon co...

  5. Val Robson says:

    This is one of the best autobiographies I have ever read I bought it after watching the Netflix six part series Wild Wild Country about Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh and his followers aka the orange people They got going in the 1970s and then moved to USA in the early 1980s where they attempted to build a new town, Rajneeshpuram, in the wilds of Oregon Some of the people within the movement let power go to their heads and it all went horribly wrong for them and the thousands of followers in the This is one of the best autobiographies I have ever read I bought it after watching the Netflix six part series Wild W...

  6. Elizabeth Urello says:

    I read a lot of books about cults and cult members I don t have an explanation for why, it s just an interest I have The tagline of this particular book could read, An interesting person ruined my life, and I have no idea why This memoir of Guest s upbringing in the Rajneeshi cult should be fascinating, but it s spoiled by Guest s inability to elevate it from mere factual retelling into literary memoir He plods along, recalling every tiny detail as if it were important for its own sake, so I read a lot of books about cults and cult members I don t have an explanation for why, it s just an interest I have The tagline of this particular book could read, An interesting person ruined my life, and I have no idea why This memoir of Guest s upbringing in the Rajneeshi cult should be fascinating, but it s spoiled by Guest s inability to elevate it from mere factual retelling into literary memoir He plods along, recalling every tiny detail as if it were important for its own sake, so that the book is stuffed with childhood recollections that aren t necessary for our understanding of his experience And he offers almost no insight into the characters of the people involved it s a lot of here s what happened and almost no and here are the conclusions I ve drawn about it, which resul...

  7. Bharath says:

    This is a book about the period when Tim s mother was a close follower of the controversial guru Osho Rajneesh His mother starts by attending a lecture and gets deeply involved visiting and living in the Pune ashram of Osho and later Europe, America as well As he was a small boy at the time, Tim recounts much of this later That is one of the problems of the book There is no insight on what Tim s mother found attractive in Os...

  8. minnie says:

    I read this over the weekend and found it a fascinating insight into the insane world of the religious cult.It s the memories of Tim Guest, whose mother joined Bhagwans followers in 1980 and dragged her young son around various Ashrams.This book was extremely sad, young Tim runs wild at Medina the Orange peoples headquarters in Suffolk with the other kids and does all the things normal kids do, but with no real love or input from his mother.When Bhagwan sets up a huge village in Oregon,and I read this over the weekend and found it a fascinating insight into the insane world of the religious cult.It s the memories of Tim Guest, whose mother joined Bhagwans followers in 1980 and dragged her young son around various Ashrams.This book was extremely sad, young Tim runs wild at Medina the Orange peoples headquarters in Suffolk with the ...

  9. Jenny (Reading Envy) says:

    Tim was 6 when his mother decided to follow Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh This chronicles his memories of living on various Rajneesh compounds in India, the UK, Rajneeshpuram in Oregon , and even a school in Holland It was fascinating For instance, who knew that one of the leaders of this group was the only instance of biological warfare used in the United S...

  10. Barry says:

    Fascinating personal story of a childhood in Bhagwani communes Honest about the emotional neglect, and the craziness of it all, but also sympathetic in its recognition of the adults as lost souls and often desperate seekers Mostly personal, as I said, but also lightly seasoned with insights.

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