Raising Abel: The Recovery of the Eschatological Imagination

Raising Abel: The Recovery of the Eschatological Imagination[Read] ➺ Raising Abel: The Recovery of the Eschatological Imagination ➶ James Alison – Heartforum.co.uk Raising Abel is a theological exploration of a huge change of mind the change which the apostolic group underwent as a result of the Resurrection and how that paradigm can transform the world today Ma Raising Abel is The Recovery Kindle Ó a theological exploration of a huge change of mind the change which the apostolic group underwent as a result of the Resurrection and how that paradigm can transform the world today Making use of the thought of Rene Girard, the author shows how the God who was revealed by Jesus subverted the violent language, imagery and expectations of the early Christians.

James Alison b The Recovery Kindle Ó is a Catholic theologian, priest and author He grew up in an evangelical family in England and converted to Catholicism as a teenager Alison studied at Oxford and earned his doctorate in theology from the Jesuit Faculty in Belo Horizonte, Brazil He was a member of the Dominican order from .

Raising Abel: The Recovery of the Eschatological
  • Paperback
  • 208 pages
  • Raising Abel: The Recovery of the Eschatological Imagination
  • James Alison
  • English
  • 13 January 2017
  • 082451565X

10 thoughts on “Raising Abel: The Recovery of the Eschatological Imagination

  1. Jessie says:

    One of the best theologians writing today he s saying God is love and not violence works with Rene Girard s theory of mimetic desire the scapegoat a taste in the measure that we learn unconcern about our reputation, in that measure the Father can produce in us the same love which he has for his Son and the same love which he and his Son have for the human race Here is where we have to make an imaginative effort, or at least I do That love is in no way marked by any desire for vindicatio One of the best theologians writing today he s saying God is love and not violence works with Rene Girard s theory of mimetic desire the scapegoat a taste in the measure that we learn unconcern about our reputation, in that measure the Father can produce in us the same love which he has for his Son and the same love which he and his Son have for the human race Here is where we have to make an imaginative effort, or at least I do That love is in no way marked by any desire for vindication, for restoring besmirched reputations, for turning the tables of this world, and all that might seem to us to be just and proper, given the horror of the violence of our world That love loves all that It loves the persecutors, the scandalized it loves the depressives and the traitors and the finger pointers That love doesn t seek a fulminating revelation of what has really been going on as a final vengeance for all the violence, even though we may fear that it will be so That love is utterly removed from being party to any final settling of accounts That love, the love which was the inner dynamic of the coming of the Son to the world, of Jesus historical living out, seeks desperately and insatiably that good and evil may participate in a wedding banquet

  2. Aeisele says:

    Everyone must read gay Dominicans Really, Alison is quite brilliant This book is basically about the transformation of our conception of who God is, and what the world is, through the death, resurrection, and ascension of Jesus While I m not all into the Girardian scapegoat theories it s kind of a lack of nuance on what ancient sacrifice was , I do find Alison s reading of NT texts really invigorating One of his basic insights is that Jesus is the crucified and risen victim, the Lord of his Everyone must read gay Dominicans Really, Alison is quite brilliant This book is basically about the transformation of our conception of who God is, and what the world is, through the death, resurrection, and ascension of Jesus While I m not all into the Girardian scapegoat theories it s kind of a lack of nuance on what ancient sacrifice was , I do find Alison s reading of NT texts really invigorating One of his basic insights is that Jesus is the crucified and risen victim, the Lord of history who is also the victim of history, and that this fundamentally transforms our imagination Instead of our imagination being controlled by death and exclusion, it is opened up to the complete deathlessness of God This transforms our desire from being one of rivalry and envy to one of gifting and receiving That s his basic thesis, and he reads biblical texts from that lens Although I don t think he always does a great job explaining the vengence passages in the NT, his exegesis really is fascinating

  3. julia says:

    this book exploded my brain in a good way

  4. Renée says:

    Alison has read Ratzinger s eschatology and it SHOWS.His articulation of Christian hope why does he not call it grace in contradistinction to progress was so on point I was uncomfortable with his comments about Stonewall gay activism but I assume this is mostly a product of time being a priest I appreciate Alison s mimetic systematics but I think I am left wondering what sort of moral systems can be created out of this them But I think Coakley, et alia are probably the shape they would tak Alison has read Ratzinger s eschatology and it SHOWS.His articulation of Christian hope why does he not call it grace in contradistinction to progress was so on point I was uncomfortable with his comments about Stonewall gay activism but I assume this is mostly a product of time being a priest I appreciate Alison s mimetic systematics but I think I am left wondering what sort of moral systems can be created out of this them But I think Coakley, et alia are probably the shape they would take desire, but transformed through asceticism, in Coakley s formulation This practice of retraining desire has a beginning, Allison would argue, in recognizing the fundamental mimetic shape of the desire and acknowledging it rather than denying it Lovely system, or at least sketch of one, to make sense of hell, particularly in the midst of current debates

  5. John Forbis says:

    This book through Girardian theory shows how the Crucifixion doesn t necessarily have to be about atonement for our sins Rather it s the radical way to expose the lie that a few scapegoats can be sacrificed for the good of all Ultimately death does not have the final word So violence then is exposed for what it truly is Jesus whole understanding of his life is to show us how we can reject and counter violence with God s notion of deathless life I thank God for a book like this And THA This book through Girardian theory shows how the Crucifixion doesn t necessarily have to be about atonement for our sins Rather it s the radical way to expose the lie that a few scapegoats can be sacrificed for the good of all Ultimately death does not have the final word So violence then is exposed for what it truly is Jesus whole understanding of his life is to show us how we can reject and counter violence with God s notion of deathless life I thank God for a book like this And THANK YOU, James Alison

  6. Andrew Marr says:

    This rates among the most powerfully stimulating books I ve ever read I wish I could give it, say, seven stars Alison is among the most creative inspiring developers of Ren Girard s thought The emphasis is on a theology of the Resurrection what that means for all us in the here now as well as in the future The witnessing to the power of the forgiving Victim shakes up our tendencies toward accepting righteous violence to a deep vision of God as a God of life This rates among the most powerfully stimulating books I ve ever read I wish I could give it, say, seven stars Alison is among the most creative inspiring developers of Ren Girard s thought The emphasis is on a theology of the Resurrection what that means for all us in the here now as well as in the future The witnessing to the power of the forgiving Victim shakes up our tendencies toward accepting righteous violence to a deep vision of God as a God of life

  7. Lori says:

    It has been awhile since I read this book However from what I can remember the book is based on the Mimetic theory understanding humans based on how they interact socially The focus is on our culture of death and it s only through a change in our perception of God that we change our perception of ourselves and those we interact with socially Love anyone

  8. James Richardson says:

    What would faith look like if we knew really knew that death is not a boundary Alison s approach to faith and reconcilliation is breath taking, and his approach to atonement is life saving Highly recommend.

  9. LVD says:

    I need to read this again.

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